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Australia leaves the internet

Filed under
Web

theregister.co.uk: It's Australia Day tomorrow, and the country's subjects are using it to mark a week of protests against government plans for compulsory internet censorship.

SourceForge blocks Iran, North Korea, Syria, Sudan and Cuba

Filed under
OSS
Web

downloadsquad.com: In a move that must surely strike at the very core of open source, FOSS, and the heart of GNU crusader Richard Stallman, SourceForge has now blocked all access from by countries on the U.S. 'Foreign Assets Control sanction list'.

Also: Clarifying SourceForge.net’s denial of site access for certain persons

Red Hat launches opensource.com with Drupal

Filed under
Linux
Drupal
Web

blog.internetnews.com: Red Hat has just launched a new portal at opensource.com - for information and articles about open source. The site uses the Drupal open source content management system and it looks like Red Hat has been working on the site since at least October.

Internet 2009 in numbers

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Web

royal.pingdom.com: What happened with the Internet in 2009? How many websites were added? How many emails were sent? How many Internet users were there?

Tor Project servers hacked

Filed under
Security
Web

h-online.com: The Tor project developers have advised users to update their Tor anonymity software to version 0.2.1.22 or 0.2.2.7-alpha as soon as possible. This is because, in early January, two of the project's seven directory authorities (moria1 and gabelmoo) as well as the metrics.torproject.org statistics server were found to have been hacked.

A no-cost Windows killer: On Sale Now, only $26!

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Web
Ubuntu

linuxtoday.com/blog: You just can't make this stuff up. This alleged news article at Technology Marketing Corporation (there is a clue in the site name) makes grandiose, breathless claims about Ubuntu:

Jobs.Linux.Com: When Job Boards Go Bad

Filed under
Linux
Web

daniweb.com: Last week, The Linux Foundation launched it's new Linux Jobs board and normally, I applaud anything that The Linux Foundation (TLF) does but not this time. And I think it's great that TLF has a job board on Linux.com, however, the execution lacks the luster I've come to expect from these guys. So, what's my beef with something so positive as a job board?

Crowdsourcing the KDE Web Site

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KDE
Web

ostatic.com/blog: The KDE Project is taking a smart approach to reworking the KDE Website. Lydia Pintscher put out the call Sunday for contributors to pitch in with content and screenshots for one or more KDE programs by January 23rd.

Who is KDE (once more with feeling)

Filed under
KDE
Web

nowwhatthe.blogspot: A while ago I expressed my appreciation for all the cool blogs out there. And my sadness when it comes to my limited language knowledge - lots of interesting KDE writers and even whole communities out there I can't understand at all.

The rise of web applications and Chrome: it's all about timescales

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Web

The significant thing about Chrome is that it sets a new way of thinking. It does not mean Chrome will dominate the world. Open standards mean that other companies could provide similar services.

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Linux Devices

Koozali SME Server 8.2 Reaches End of Life on March 31, Upgrade to Koozali SME 9

Koozali Foundation, through Terry Fage, announced the availability of a final set of updates for the Koozali SME Server 8.2 operating system, which will reach end of life this week. Patching some of the reported bugs, the new packages released today for Koozali SME Server 8.2 are e-smith-ibays-2.2.0-16.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, e-smith-manager-2.2.0-14.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, smeserver-clamav-2.2.0-15.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, smeserver-locale-*-2.2.0-56.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, and smeserver-yum-2.2.0-26.el5.sme.noarch.rpm. Read more

Development News

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