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What's the fastest Linux web browser?

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Linux
Web

Firefox is easily the most popular Linux web browser. In the recent LinuxQuestions survey, Firefox took first place with 51.7 percent of the vote. Chrome came in second with a mere 15.67 percent. The other browsers all had, at most, scores in single percentages. But is Firefox really the fastest browser? I put them them to the test, and here's what I found.

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Open source web servers | NGINX, Apache, Lighttpd and more

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OSS
Web

Web servers have come a long way since the CERN httpd was developed by Tim Berners-Lee in 1990 as part of the same project that resulted in the first ever web browser.

Some of the leading suppliers of web servers today provide closed source enterprise-level options for enterprises, but many others retain the open values embodied by Tim Berners-Lee and the decision to release the source code for CERN httpd into the public domain in 1993.

Computerworld UK looks at the best open source web servers currently available for enterprises.

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OpenSUSE Web Site Cracked, Tumbleweed Update

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Security
Web
SUSE

Epiphany 3.24 Web Browser to Introduce a Powerful "Clear Personal Data" Dialog

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GNOME
Web

The development of the Epiphany 3.24 web browser continues for the upcoming GNOME 3.24 desktop environment, due for release on March 22, 2017, and a new preview release is now available for public testing.

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WordPress Addons

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OSS
Web
  • 8 Essential WordPress Plugins Your Website Must Have

    WordPress, what a CMS right? So many available plugins, themes, and tutorials. More than 27% of world websites are powered by a WordPress CMS. A staggering statistic which kinda indicates the level of functionality and flexibility it offers to webmasters. A complete website solution with an easy-to-use aura surrounding it.

    Chances are that while you are reading this another WordPress website has been launched into the vast ocean of information we call the Internet. Hell, you’ve probably reached this article by researching about WordPress after hearing that Joe from high school is making tons of money with his WordPress sites.

  • WordPress Updates in CentOS 7 + Apache + SELinux

    A couple of weeks ago I moved my WordPress blogs from a trivial shared hosting to a more sophisticated VPS running CentOS 7 since I was in search of more flexibility from my server.

    During these days, I learned a lot about managing a web server on my own and I’m still currently learning a ton of interesting things about this topic.

    One of the most annoying problems I faced a couple of days ago concerned, in particular, my WordPress installation. Everytime I was trying to update its core and plugins, the dashboard showed me a message similar to this...

Hardened Tor Browser 7.0 Enters Development, Uses Tor 0.3 and Firefox 45.7.0 ESR

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Security
Web

The Tor Project announced earlier this week the release of Tor Browser 6.5 as the newest stable version of the open-source and hardened web browser that utilizes the latest Tor technologies to keep your online presence anonymous at all times.

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Web Tools for GNU/Linux

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Web
  • Wkhtmltopdf – A Smart Tool to Convert Website HTML Page to PDF in Linux

    Wkhtmltopdf is an open source simple and much effective command-line shell utility that enables user to convert any given HTML (Web Page) to PDF document or an image (jpg, png, etc).

    Wkhtmltopdf is written in C++ programming language and distributed under GNU/GPL (General Public License). It uses WebKit rendering layout engine to convert HTML pages to PDF document without loosing the quality of the pages. Its is really very useful and trustworthy solution for creating and storing snapshots of web pages in real-time.

  • Review on Vivaldi: The New Modern Web Browser

    There are a lot of web browsers which are free (as in freedom) and free (as in free coffee). Each one of them has its own set of features and tweaks which make it different from the others. Today we would like to introduce the Vivaldi browser to you.

    Vivaldi is a cross-platform web browser based on the Blink engine (Same in Chrome and Chromium). It started in 2015 as a project for a group of developers who left Opera browser development to work on the “web browser for friends”. Since that time, a lot of features and improvements were added to the browser. Making it unique.

  • Me And My ISP

    So, We are a lot more dependent on our ISP than I knew. Oh, how the Internet has changed. Almost nothing is flat HTML any more. Huge data, images and JavaScript pour down on us. I used to run a whole school on dial-up…

Chrome 56

Filed under
Google
OSS
Web
  • Chrome 56 rolling out to Mac, Windows, and Linux, full HTML5 by Default & ‘Not Secure’ label rollout

    Chrome 56 is rolling out now to Mac, Windows, and Linux with a number of features and security fixes. Beginning as a staged rollout in the previous version, HTML5 by Default is now enabled for all users. Additionally, all sensitive HTTP sites will be marked as unsecure in the address bar.

    With last month’s release, Chrome only defaulted to HTML5 for a small subset of users. Now, it is enabled by default, with the first visit to webpages prompting users about Flash usage. This deprecation of the Adobe plug-in should lead to a better and safer web browsing experience.

  • Google Promotes Chrome 56 to Stable with HTML5 by Default, 51 Security Fixes

    Google promoted today its Chrome 56 web browser to the stable channel for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows, which comes about 55 days after Chrome 55 was released.

  • Google Chrome Now Defaults to HTML5 for All

    With the version 56 update, Google has enabled Chrome to default to HTML5-based rendering for better speed and security. This means that content still using Flash won’t display immediately and instead will require your manual authorization to run.

  • Chrome 56 Released With WebGL 2.0 By Default, FLAC Support

    Chrome 56 ships with HTML5 by default, WebGL 2.0 by default, sensitive pages (including those with password boxes) loaded over HTTP are now marked as insecure, support for FLAC audio is enabled by default (similar to the recent Firefox release), improves performance of the browser by throttling web-pages in background tabs, and a variety of other enhancements.

Mozilla Firefox 51 Is the First Web Browser to Support the New WebGL 2 Standard

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Web

If you switched away from Firefox, you might want to give it another try because Mozilla has announced today a new version that implements support for the new WebGL 2 standard, which enables the next-gen of 3D graphics on the Web.

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Epiphany Browser to Add New "Copy Image" Context Menu Item, Support IDN URLs

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GNOME
Web

Even if it might not become your everyday web browser, Epiphany is getting much-deserved attention from the GNOME Project, which plans on implementing many new features for the next major release, Epiphany 3.24.

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More in Tux Machines

LWN (Now Open Access): Kernel Configuration, Linux 4.14 Merge Window, Running Android on a Mainline Graphics Stack

  • A different approach to kernel configuration
    The kernel's configuration system can be challenging to deal with; Linus Torvalds recently called it "one of the worst parts of the whole project". Thus, anything that might help users with the process of configuring a kernel build would be welcome. A talk by Junghwan Kang at the 2017 Open-Source Summit demonstrated an interesting approach, even if it's not quite ready for prime time yet. Kang is working on a Debian-based, cloud-oriented distribution; he wanted to tweak the kernel configuration to minimize the size of the kernel and, especially, to reduce its attack surface by removing features that were not needed. The problem is that the kernel is huge, and there are a lot of features that are controlled by configuration options. There are over 300 feature groups and over 20,000 configuration options in current kernels. Many of these options have complicated dependencies between them, adding to the challenge of configuring them properly.
  • The first half of the 4.14 merge window
    September 8, 2017 As of this writing, just over 8,000 non-merge changesets have been pulled into the mainline kernel repository for the 4.14 development cycle. In other words, it looks like the pace is not slowing down for this cycle either. The merge window is not yet done, but quite a few significant changes have been merged so far. Read on for a summary of the most interesting changes entering the mainline in the first half of this merge window.
  • Running Android on a mainline graphics stack
    The Android system may be based on the Linux kernel, but its developers have famously gone their own way for many other parts of the system. That includes the graphics subsystem, which avoids user-space components like X or Wayland and has special (often binary-only) kernel drivers as well. But that picture may be about to change. As Robert Foss described in his Open Source Summit North America presentation, running Android on the mainline graphics subsystem is becoming possible and brings a number of potential benefits. He started the talk by addressing the question of why one might want to use mainline graphics with Android. The core of the answer was simple enough: we use open-source software because it's better, and running mainline graphics takes us toward a fully open system. With mainline graphics, there are no proprietary blobs to deal with. That, in turn, makes it easy to run current versions of the kernel and higher-level graphics software like Mesa.

Beautify Your KDE Plasma 5 Desktop Environment with Freshly Ported Adapta Theme

Good morning! It's time to beautify your KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment, and we have just the perfect theme for that as it looks like the popular Adapta GTK theme was recently ported to Plasma 5. Read more

Roughing it, with Linux

I have been traveling for about two weeks now, spending 10 days camping in Iceland and now a few days on the ferry to get back. For this trip I brought along my Samsung N150 Plus (a very old netbook), loaded with openSUSE Linux 42.3. Read more

Red Hat: Ansible Tower, Patent Promise, and Shares Declining

  • Red Hat’s automation solution spreading among APAC enterprises
    Red Hat recently shared revealed its agentless automation platform is spreading among enterprises in APAC countries like Australia, China, India and Singapore. The company asserts its Ansible Tower helps enterprises cut through the complexities of modern IT environments with powerful automation capabilities that improve productivity and reduce downtime. “Today’s business demands can mean even greater complexity for many organisations. Such dynamic environments can necessitate a new approach to automation that can improve speed, scale and stability across IT environments,” says head of APAC office of technology at Red Hat, Frank Feldmann.
  • Red Hat broadens patent pledge to most open-source software
    Red Hat, the world's biggest open source company, has expanded its commitment on patents, which had originally been not to enforce its patents against free and open source software.
  • Red Hat expands Patent Promise
    Open-source software provider Red Hat has revised its Patent Promise, which was initially intended to discourage patent aggression against free and open-source software. The expanded version of the defensive patent aggregation scheme extends the zone of non-enforcement to all of Red Hat’s patents and all software under “well-recognised” open-source licenses. In its original Patent Promise in 2002, Red Hat said software patents are “inconsistent with open-source and free software”.
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) AO Seeing a Consistent Downtrend
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) noted a price change of -0.14% and RingCentral, Inc. (RNG) closes with a move of -2.09%