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The Free Software Way, by Richard Fontana, Esq.

Filed under
Linux
Web

groklaw.net: Red Hat has a new website. I thought I'd introduce you to the website's rich content by posting an article from the Law section. It's by Richard Fontana, who is Red Hat's Open Source Licensing and Patent Counsel. He explains very clearly the legal rights that are implied by free, not just open source, software, and its extension to other areas, and why open source, while necessary, is not enough.

Fencing and Tollgating the Internet

Filed under
Software
Web

linuxtoday.com/blog: This story about yet another attempt to raise a tollgate on the Internet deserves having some extra attention called to it.

Um, What The Blank Is Going On With Sourceforge?

Filed under
OSS
Web

penguinpetes.com: In the middle of our day-to-day Hobbit-like peaceful work in the FOSS tech field, we have all suddenly had a grenade fall in our lap. And this makes no sense.

Top 5 Most Wanted Ubuntu Weblogs for 2009

Filed under
Web
Ubuntu

techdrivein.blogspot: A lot of Ubuntu support weblogs have sprung up in the last few years and some of them are really good. Here are 5 of the the most wanted Ubuntu weblogs for 2009.

Australia leaves the internet

Filed under
Web

theregister.co.uk: It's Australia Day tomorrow, and the country's subjects are using it to mark a week of protests against government plans for compulsory internet censorship.

SourceForge blocks Iran, North Korea, Syria, Sudan and Cuba

Filed under
OSS
Web

downloadsquad.com: In a move that must surely strike at the very core of open source, FOSS, and the heart of GNU crusader Richard Stallman, SourceForge has now blocked all access from by countries on the U.S. 'Foreign Assets Control sanction list'.

Also: Clarifying SourceForge.net’s denial of site access for certain persons

Red Hat launches opensource.com with Drupal

Filed under
Linux
Drupal
Web

blog.internetnews.com: Red Hat has just launched a new portal at opensource.com - for information and articles about open source. The site uses the Drupal open source content management system and it looks like Red Hat has been working on the site since at least October.

Internet 2009 in numbers

Filed under
Web

royal.pingdom.com: What happened with the Internet in 2009? How many websites were added? How many emails were sent? How many Internet users were there?

Tor Project servers hacked

Filed under
Security
Web

h-online.com: The Tor project developers have advised users to update their Tor anonymity software to version 0.2.1.22 or 0.2.2.7-alpha as soon as possible. This is because, in early January, two of the project's seven directory authorities (moria1 and gabelmoo) as well as the metrics.torproject.org statistics server were found to have been hacked.

A no-cost Windows killer: On Sale Now, only $26!

Filed under
Web
Ubuntu

linuxtoday.com/blog: You just can't make this stuff up. This alleged news article at Technology Marketing Corporation (there is a clue in the site name) makes grandiose, breathless claims about Ubuntu:

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