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Google, Browsers & DRM

Filed under
Google
Web

A recent brouhaha concerning Google comes from an item that made the rounds in the last week or so regarding older browsers and Google search. It seems that some users of older browsers have been receiving an outdated version of Google’s homepage when attempting to make a search. Evidently, Google searches made using these browsers returned results just fine, using Google’s current results page, but users needed to return to the search engine’s homepage to conduct another search. The browsers affected are primarily older versions of Opera and Safari.

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WordPress 4.0 for Debian

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OSS
Web
Debian

Yesterday WordPress released version 4.0 or “Benny” of WordPress. I have now downloaded it and packed up for Debian users.

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5 things you need to know about the Raspberry Pi’s Epiphany web browser

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Linux
Web

Epiphany is a new web browser for the Raspberry Pi. It’s been modified to be faster, smoother and more powerful than the previous web browser, Midori, meaning it possible to watch 720p YouTube videos and browse more Javascript-heavy websites like RaspberryPi.org and RasPi.Today.

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Oracle's MySQL buy a 'fiasco' says Dovecot man Mikko Linnanmäki

Filed under
Server
OSS
Web

A co-founder of the widely-used IMAP server Dovecot has outlined his three rules for open source success, in terms Larry Ellison may not enjoy.

“The first rule is don't sell your company to Oracle if you want to keep your product alive,” he told World Hosting Day in Singapore yesterday.

“The second rule is also don't sell sell your company to Oracle.”

Linnanmäki's remarks were, of course, made in reference to Oracle's acquisition of MySQL, a transaction he feels was a “fiasco” but has turned out “not that bad because the only one suffering is Oracle.”

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A web browser for the Raspberry Pi

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Linux
Web

As I previously mentioned, Collabora has been working with the Raspberry Pi Foundation on various projects including a web browser optimised for the Raspberry Pi.
Since the first beta release we have made huge improvements; now the browser is more responsive, it’s faster, and videos work much better (the first beta could play 640×360 videos at 0.5fps, now we can play 25fps 1280×720 videos smoothly). Some web sites are still a bit slow (if they are heavy on the JavaScript side), but there’s not much we can do for web sites that, even on my laptop with an Intel Core i7, use 100% of one of the cores for more than ten seconds.

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Chrome 38 Beta: New primitives for the next-generation web

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Google
Software
Web

Today’s Chrome Beta channel release includes a ton of new primitives and APIs to simplify development and give developers more control over their web applications. Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to Chrome for Android, Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome OS.

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The Ubuntu Touch Internet Browser Has Been Redesigned

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Linux
Web
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu developers have worked a lot lately at Ubuntu Touch and related, due to the fact that they hope to make the first Ubuntu Touch powered available this Autumn.

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WebKitGTK+ 2.5.1: Good bye WebKit1

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Development
GNOME
Web

WebKitGTK+ 2.5.1 is the first version of this release cycle. It comes very late mainly due to the regressions introduced by the switch to CMake and the problems we found after removing WebKit1 from the tree. It also includes some new features that I’ll talk about in other posts, probably when 2.6.0 is released. In this post I’ll only focus on the breaks introduced in this release, in order to help everybody to adapt their applications to the API changes if needed...

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DistroWatch resolves its domain registrar problems

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Web

Last week the Linux world was surprised to find that DistroWatch was not available at its usual domain name. Many wondered what was happening with the site, and it turned out that it had some domain registrar problems. Ladislav Bonar clarifies what went wrong last week and assures DistroWatch readers that the site has already been transferred to a new registrar.

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Breach is a completely modular, hackable and open source web browser

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OSS
Web

When it comes to surfing the web, our options are limited: the market is dominated by three or four mainstream web browsers, all of which share major similarities in design and function. Unless you want to build your own browsing program, you're stuck with their modern browsing paradigms. For San Francisco programmer Stanislas Polu, that wasn't good enough, so, he created Breach -- an open source modular web browser designed to allow anybody to tweak and modify it on a whim.

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More in Tux Machines

6 tips for adopting open source

Open source code drives collaborative innovation from a larger pool of developers at a lower cost, which is why federal agencies are adopting the "open source first" model. In fact Sonny Hashmi, CIO of the General Services Administration, recently announced that implementing open source software is among his top priorities this year. Read more

Linux admins: It's time to relearn the art of compiling apps

It used to be that open source software was released only as source code and had to be compiled wherever it was needed. Obviously, that's changed. Today, some will even tell you that compiling source is an improper and problematic way to install software. Tomorrow, it may become more standard than they think. While compiling source is still the basis of many BSDs (though you can get binary packages easily enough), package management came to Linux early on with RPM and branched out everywhere ever since. Package support on Debian and Ubuntu is simply massive. Fedora has a huge number of packages, as do RHEL and CentOS, though the packages available for the latter are generally far older for legacy and stability reasons. Read more

Dirt-cheap laptops might be this year's stocking stuffer

Chromebooks, the low-cost compute devices that run Google’s Chrome OS, haven’t necessarily been showcased in Black Friday circulars, but they’re making an impression nonetheless. Although prices vary, Chromebooks generally range from $200 to $350 or so, and now come loaded with up to 1TB of Google Drive storage, too. Read more

I GIve Up On Systemd

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