Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Web

Cost of DRM, Intel Brings DRM to Linux, W3C Brings DRM to the Web

Filed under
Linux
Web
  • People Would Pay A Hell Of A Lot More If DRM Were Gone

    An argument that we've made for years is that for all the whining about how the legacy entertainment industry insists it needs DRM, adding DRM takes away value. It limits the content/games/software/etc. that people purchase a license to and therefore limits the value. You don't need an economics degree to recognize that providing less value decreases how much people are willing to pay (and how many people are willing to pay). Thus, there's at least some economic force when using DRM that decreases the potential market for DRM'd offerings. Supporters of DRM will likely counter with some version of the argument that this decrease in value/addressable market is okay, because it's less than the expected decrease in the potential market that happens when "OMG I CAN GET A PIRATED VERSION FOR FREE!?!?!?!??" enters the market. I'm not entirely convinced that's true -- as time and time again, we've seen that people are more than happy to pay for (1) official versions in order to support creators they know, appreciate and trust and (2) especially when it comes with other benefits beyond just the content.

  • Intel Is Working On HDCP Content Protection For Linux Graphics Stack

    While sure to face opposition by some free software fans, Intel developers have begun working on High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection (HDCP) support for the Linux Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) code.

    High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection is the form of copy protection for being able to secure audio/video over DP/DVI/HDMI connections. HDCP-encrypted content cannot be played on unauthorized devices, prevents snooping of the data in the middle as the data is being sent, etc. HDCP dates back to the early 2000s while the most recent version is HDCP 2.2 from 2013. Intel Linux developers are working on bringing HDCP 2.2 to the open-source Linux DRM kernel code.

  • Encrypted Media Extensions a W3C Recommendation [Ed: Not just graphics DRM. " Ugh! Linux is about freedom. Go away with your copy protection crap," as one comment put it]

    Encrypted Media Extensions (EME) have been under review by the W3C Advisory Committee since last March. This report from the committee addresses comments and objections to EME. "After consideration of the issues, the Director reached a decision that the EME specification should move to W3C Recommendation. The Encrypted Media Extensions specification remains a better alternative for users than other platforms, including for reasons of security, privacy, and accessibility, by taking advantage of the Web platform. While additional work in some areas may be beneficial for the future of the Web Platform, it remains appropriate for the W3C to make the EME specification a W3C Recommendation. Formal publication of the W3C Recommendation will happen at a later date. We encourage W3C Members and the community to work in both technical and policy areas to find better solutions in this space."

W3C DRM Backlash

Filed under
Security
Web
  • "W3C Embraces DRM - Declares War on Humanity" - Lunduke Hour

    The W3C has voted to standardize DRM for all of the Web -- in direct opposition to their own Mission Statement. What they are doing could have dire consequences for the entire Web. I yell about that for an hour. Because I'm mad.

  • DRM free Smart TV

    Libreboot is a free BIOS replacement which removes the Intel Management Engine. The Intel Management Engine is proprietary malware which includes a back door and some DRM functions. Netflix uses this hardware DRM called the Protected Audio/Video Path on Windows 10 when watching 4K videos. The Thinkpad T400 does not even have an HDMI port, which is known to be encumbered by HDCP, an ineffective DRM that has been cracked.

    Instead of using DRM encumbered streaming services such as Netflix, Entertain or Vodafone TV, I still buy DVDs and pay them anonymously with cash. In my home there is a DVB-C connector, which I have connected to a FRITZ!WLAN Repeater DVB-C which streams the TV signal to the ThinkPad. The TV set is switched on and off using a FRITZ!DECT 200 which I control using a python script running on the ThinkPad. I also reuse an old IR remote and an IRDuino to control the ThinkPad.

  • Over many objections, W3C approves DRM for HTML5

    A narrower covenant not to sue was proposed, but even this much narrower covenant was rejected. The various members of W3C appeared unlikely agree to any particular set of terms, and ultimately were never polled to see if consensus could be reached. Since the original EME proposal didn't include such a covenant, Berners-Lee decreed that failure to form one should not be allowed to block publication as an official W3C Recommendation.

July 9th - International Day Against DRM

Filed under
Web
  • The W3C has overruled members' objections and will publish its DRM for videos

    The final vote was more controversial than any in W3C history. As the months ticked by afterward without a decision from W3C Director Tim Berners-Lee, one W3C member proposed an even more modest compromise: a promise by W3C members not to sue security researchers who revealed defects in DRM that exposed users to privacy breaches. This was immediately rejected by Netflix and the CEO of the W3C and all discussion on it halted.

  • Disposition of Comments for Encrypted Media Extensions and Director's decision

    After consideration of the issues, the Director reached a decision that the EME specification should move to W3C Recommendation. [...]

  • A DRM standard has been approved for the web, and security researchers are worried

    Doctorow calls out a few specific points that have come up in the five-year-long debate over whether this standard should be approved. One is that there’s no protection for security researchers — in the US, breaking DRM, even for otherwise legal purposes, can be a crime, and the fact that EME doesn’t do anything about that keeps security researchers exposed to prosecution.

Action Against DRM on the Web

Filed under
Web
  • Leaders needed for International Day Against DRM (July 9, 2017)

    In the last year, we've seen cracks appearing in the foundation of the DRM status quo.

    Of course, the companies that profit from Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) are still trying to expand the system of law and technology that weakens our security and curtails our rights, in an effort to prop up their exploitative business models.

  • Tim Berners-Lee approves Web DRM, but W3C member organizations have two weeks to appeal

    Yesterday Tim Berners-Lee, the chief arbiter of Web standards, approved the controversial proposed Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) standard for the Web, Encrypted Media Extensions (EME).

  • Tim Berners-Lee Sells Out His Creation: Officially Supports DRM In HTML

    For years now, we've discussed the various problems with the push (led by the MPAA, but with some help from Netflix) to officially add DRM to the HTML 5 standard. Now, some will quibble with even that description, as supporters of this proposal insist that it's not actually adding DRM, but rather this "Encrypted Media Extensions" (EME) is merely just a system by which DRM might be implemented, but that's a bunch of semantic hogwash. EME is bringing DRM directly into HTML and killing the dream of a truly open internet. Instead, we get a functionally broken internet. Despite widespread protests and concerns about this, W3C boss (and inventor of the Web), Tim Berners-Lee, has signed off on the proposal. Of course, given the years of criticism over this, that signoff has come with a long and detailed defense of the decision... along with a tiny opening to stop it.

    There are many issues underlying this decision, but there are two key ones that we want to discuss here: whether EME is necessary at all and whether or not the W3C should have included a special protection for security researchers.

Web Browsers and Blockchain

Filed under
OSS
Web
  • Mozilla Rolls Out First Firefox 54 Point Release to Fix Netflix Issue on Linux

    More than two weeks after Mozilla unveiled Firefox 54 as the first branch of the web browser to use multiple operating system processes for web page content, we now see the availability of the first point release.

    Mozilla Firefox 54.0.1 was first offered to the stable release channel users on June 29, 2017, and, according to the official release notes, it fixes a Netflix issues for users of Linux-based operating systems, addresses a PDF printing issue, and resolves multiple tab-related issues that have been reported from Firefox 54.0.

  • The Top Four Open-Source Blockchain Projects in Media

    1. Brave Web Browser

    Once upon a time, getting users to pay attention to ads on webpages was the biggest problem facing online marketers. Today, that challenge has grown even more daunting. Convincing users not to block online ads entirely has become a major task in online media.

    Brave is an open-source web browser that gives users the option to block the ads that they would normally see when they visit a website. If the user so chooses, Brave replaces those blocked ads with ones tailored to a user's preferences. The browser gives the users a slice of the advertising revenue from the tailored ads. By paying users to view ads tailored to them, Brave delivers a better user experience, while also making it easier for advertisers to reach qualified leads through online ads.

    Blockchain technology enters the picture in two ways. First, Bitcoin is used to facilitate financial transactions between Brave and its advertising partners and users. Second, Brave uses the Bitcoin ledger to store data about user browsing behavior. This eliminates the need for a centralized database where specific users' behavior would be linked to their names. Instead, browsing behavior remains anonymous and essentially un-hackable.

  • Blockstack: An Open Source Browser Powered By Blockchain For Creating A New Internet

    Blockstack, a blockchain startup, has released a decentralized browser to make an internet that would be free from dependence on large organizations and key players. The makers of Blockstack browser have called it the Netscape of the decentralized internet for running and making apps. A developer release of Blockstack browser is available, and a user version will arrive in six months.

  • Colu Launches Bankbox, an Open-Source Protocol to Help Banks Issue Digital Currencies
  • BloqLabs from Bloq goes live to connect enterprises with open source blockchain projects
  •  

  • Bloq Launches BloqLabs to Bring Open Source Blockchain Technologies to Enterprise

    Bloq, a leader in the development of enterprise-grade Blockchain solutions, has launched BloqLabs to expand its ongoing sponsorship and support of critical open source projects in the bitcoin and Blockchain ecosystems.

  • [Older] Blockchain pioneers back open source code, Greenwich Associates

    81% view permissioned blockchains as inherently more secure than public blockchains. “In the end, a blockchain-enabled financial market will likely consist of a core plumbing of market infrastructure developed by the open source community, operating beneath proprietary applications that provide a higher level of security,” says Johnson.

Chromium, Chrome, and Mozilla Firefox

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • Chromium Mus/Ozone update (H1/2017): wayland, x11

    Since January, Igalia has been working on a project whose goal is to make the latest Chromium Browser able to run natively on Wayland-based environments. The project has various phases, requires us to carve out existing implementations and align our work with the direction Chromium’s mainline is taking.

    In this post I will provide an update on the progresses we have made over 2017/H1, as well as our plans coming next.

    In order to jump straight to the latest results section (including videos) without the details, click here.

  • Browse Against the Machine

    I head up Firefox marketing, but I use Chrome every day. Works fine. Easy to use. Like most of us who spend too much time in front of a laptop, I have two browsers open; Firefox for work, Chrome for play, customized settings for each. There are multiple things that bug me about the Chrome product, for sure, but I‘m OK with Chrome. I just don’t like only being on Chrome.

  • Firefox hogs less memory and gets a speed bump in its latest update

    In an attempt to even the playing field with competitors, Mozilla Firefox stepped up its game Tuesday by releasing an update that will increase browser speeds and cut down on memory usage.

    Firefox 54 has opened up its upper limit of processes from one to four, although users can customize it to be more by entering “about:config” in the address bar and adjusting the settings themselves.

    This new version of Firefox feels faster and it scores higher on an online browser speed test than Chrome or Safari, even after opening 20 tabs, although it still gives the old loading sign on all of the pages. Firefox product vice president Nick Nguyen calls this upgrade “the largest change to Firefox code in our history,” according to his blog post detailing the changes.

  • [Older] Firefox memory usage with multiple content processes

    My previous measurements found that four content processes are a sweet spot for both memory usage and performance. As a follow up we wanted to run the tests again to confirm my conclusions and make sure that we’re testing on what we plan to release. Additionally I was able to work around our issues testing Microsoft Edge and have included both 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Firefox on Windows; 32-bit is currently our default, 64-bit is a few releases out.

    The methodology for the test is the same as previous runs, I used the atsy project to load 30 pages and measure memory usage of the various processes that each browser spawns during that time.

Chrome 60 Beta, New Firefox, Thunderbird Themes

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
OSS
Web
  • Chrome 60 Beta Rolls Out With VP9 Improvements, New Developer Features

    Chrome 60 Beta adds a Paint Timing API to provide more insight to developers about their "first paint" performance, CSS font-display support, improvements to the Credential Management API, the Payment Request API has been added to desktop Chrome, there's a new Web Budget API to allow sites using push notifications to send a limited number of push messages that will trigger background work, support for Web Push Encryption was added, and a range of other CSS/JavaScript features and APIs.

  • The Best Firefox Ever

    On the Firefox team, one thing we always hear from our users is that they rely on the web for complex tasks like trip planning and shopping comparisons. That often means having many tabs open. And the sites and web apps running in those tabs often have lots of things going on– animations, videos, big pictures and more. Complex sites are more and more common. The average website today is nearly 2.5 megabytes – the same size as the original version of the game Doom, according to Wired. Up until now, a complex site in one Firefox tab could slow down all the others. That often meant a less than perfect browsing experience.

  • Thunderbird Arc Theme Updated With Support for Arc Variants

    An update to the Arc Thunderbird theme add-on is now available for download, and brings support for the 3 Arc GTK theme variants.

WordPress 4.8 Overview and Working From Home

Filed under
OSS
Web

Browsers: Chrome 61, Mozilla Against Software Patents, Firefox Photon, and Tor 7.0

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
OSS
Security
Web

How open source is advancing the Semantic Web

Filed under
OSS
Web

The Semantic Web, a term coined by World Wide Web (WWW) inventor Sir Tim Berners-Lee, refers to the concept that all the information in all the websites on the internet should be able to interoperate and communicate. That vision, of a web of knowledge that supplies information to anyone who wants it, is continuing to emerge and grow.

In the first generation of the WWW, Web 1.0, most people were consumers of content, and if you had a web presence it was comprised of a series of static pages conveyed in HTML. Websites had guest books and HTML forms, powered by Perl and other server-side scripting languages, that people could fill out. While HTML provides structure and syntax to the web, it doesn't provide meaning; therefore Web 1.0 couldn't inject meaning into the vast resources of the WWW.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

PC-MOS/386 is the latest obsolete operating system to open source on Github

PC-MOS/386 was first announced by The Software Link in 1986 and was released in early 1987. It was capable of working on any x86 computer (though the Intel 80386 was its target market). However, some later chips became incompatible because they didn't have the necessary memory management unit. It had a dedicated following but also contained a couple of design flaws that made it slow and/or expensive to run. Add to that the fact it had a Y2K bug that manifested on 31 July 2012, after which any files created wouldn't work, and it's not surprising that it didn't become the gold standard. The last copyright date listed is 1992, although some users have claimed to be using it far longer. Read more

GIMP, More Awesome Than I Remember

For what seems like decades, GIMP (Graphic Image Manipulation Program) has been the de facto standard image editor for Linux. It works well, has many features, and it even supports scripting. I always have found it a bit clumsy, however, and I preferred using something else for day-to-day work. I recently had the pleasure of sitting at a computer without an image editor though, so I figured I'd give GIMP another try on a non-Linux operating system. See, the last time I tried to use GIMP on OS X, it required non-standard libraries and home-brew adding. Now, if you head over to the GIMP site, you can download a fully native version of GIMP for Windows, OS X and Linux. Read more

Linux 4.13.9

I'm announcing the release of the 4.13.9 kernel. All users of the 4.13 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 4.13.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.13.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st... Read more Also: Linux 4.9.58 Linux 4.4.94 Linux 3.18.77

Linux 4.14-rc6

So rc6 is delayed, not because of any development problems, but simply because the internet was horribly bad my usual Sunday afternoon time, and I decided not to even try to fight it. And by delaying things, I got a couple more ull requests in from Greg. Yay, I guess? rc6 is a bit larger than I was hoping for, and I'm not sure whether that is a sign that we _will_ need an rc8 after all this release (which wouldn't be horribly surprising), or whether it's simply due to timing. I'm going to leave that open for now, so just know that rc8 _may_ happen. Read more Also: Linux 4.14-rc6 Released: Linux 4.14 Kernel Final In 2~3 Weeks