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QupZilla Renamed KDE Falkon, Developer David Rosca interviewed

Filed under
KDE
Interviews
Web
  • QupZilla Web Browser Becomes KDE Falkon

    The QupZilla open-source web-browser built using Qt WebEngine and in development for the past seven years is now part of the KDE project and has renamed itself to Falkon.

    Earlier this month the QupZilla developers announced they would be moving under the KDE umbrella and in the process rename itself. Today they made it known their new name for this KDE web-browser is Falkon.

  • The Licensing and Compliance Lab interviews David Rosca of QupZilla

    QupZilla, currently at version 2.1.2, is a free software Web browser using the new and very fast QtWebEngine browser. It aims to be a lightweight Web browser available through all major platforms. This project was originally started only for educational purposes by a lone developer, David Rosca, and since then, QupZilla has grown into a feature-rich browser. QupZilla has all of the standard functions you expect from a Web browser. It includes bookmarks, history (including a sidebar view), and tabs. Above that, it has ad-blocking enabled by default with a built-in plugin. Over time, this one-man project has grown to include numerous contributors.

Canonical Invites You to Test Out the Chromium Web Browser Snap on Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Web
Ubuntu

Canonical's Olivier Tilloy has put out a call for testing for what it would appear to be the very first Chromium Snap package for Ubuntu Linux and other Snappy-enabled distros.

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WWW: Chrome 61 Beta and WebAssembly Working Group

Filed under
Google
Web
  • Chrome 61 Beta: JavaScript modules, Payment Request API on desktop, Web Share API, and WebUSB

    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome Beta channel release for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, Mac, and Windows.

  • Chrome 61 Beta Rolls Out With JavaScript Modules, WebUSB Support

    Google today is shipping the beta version of the upcoming Chrome 61 web-browser release.

    Highlights of Chrome 61 Beta include native support for JavaScript modules, Payment Request API support in the desktop browser, support for the Web Share API for easily sharing content on social networks, and initial WebUSB support.

  • Launching the WebAssembly Working Group

    For over two years the WebAssembly W3C Community Group has served as a forum for browser vendors and others to come together to develop an elegant and efficient compilation target for the Web. A first version is available in 4 browser engines and is on track to become a standard part of the Web. We’ve had several successful in-person CG meetings, while continuing our robust online collaboration on github. We also look forward to engaging the wider W3C community at the WebAssembly meeting at this year’s TPAC.

Mozilla Firefox 55 Web Browser Is Now Available to Download, Here's What's New

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web

It's not yet official, but the Firefox 55.0 open-source and cross-platform web browser is now available for download on GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows operating systems.

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Browsers: Chrome/Chromium and Mozilla's Firefox, Send

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
OSS
Web
  • Chrome/Chromium Turns On Support For OpenType Variable Fonts

    Google's Chrome/Chromium web-browser has now enabled support by default for OpenType Variable Fonts.

  • The latest challenge to Google's AI dominance comes from an unlikely place -- Firefox

    Mozilla, the company behind the Firefox internet browser, has begun testing a feature that lets you enter a search query using your voice instead of typing it in. The move could help Mozilla's efforts to make Firefox more competitive with Google Chrome.

    If you're using Firefox in English on Mac, Windows or Linux, you can turn on the experimental "Voice Fill" feature and then use it on Google, Yahoo and DuckDuckGo. Support for other websites will come later.

    Alphabet's Google offers speech recognition on its search engine when accessed through Chrome on desktop -- it became available in 2013 -- and Yahoo, Microsoft's Bing and Google all let you run search queries with your voice on mobile devices. But searching with your voice on Google while using Firefox on the desktop, for example, has historically been impossible. Now Mozilla wants to make its desktop browser more competitive.

  • Fedora 26 - Firefox Test Pilot send large files.

    This tool from Firefox team let you to send you upload and encrypt large files (up to 1GB) to share online.

Mozilla Advocacy, New Test Pilot Experiments

Filed under
Web
  • Mozilla releases research results: Zero rating is not serving as an on-ramp to the internet

    Today, 4 billion people live without the internet. There’s a global debate about how to connect the unconnected, but it’s often dominated by assumptions and not a lot of data or talking to actual users on the ground.

    To better inform this issue, Mozilla recently supported a series of focus groups to investigate how and why people use subsidized services in India, Myanmar, Peru, Kenya, Nigeria, Rwanda and South Africa. Today, we’re releasing the results of this research carried out by Research ICT Africa, LIRNEasia and IEP.

  • New Test Pilot Experiments Available Today

    Last month, we delivered the first in a series of groundbreaking updates to the browser. This week, the Test Pilot team is continuing to evolve Firefox features with three new experiences that will make for a simpler, faster and safer experience.

Google Chrome 60 Released

Filed under
Google
Web

DRM-Carrying Flash's Death in the News

Filed under
Web
  • Google: HTML is Faster, Safer, and More Power Efficient Than Adobe's Flash

    After Adobe's big announcement this morning that they plan to end support for Flash in late 2020, Google Chrome's Anthony Laforge published a blog article asking Flash developers to start transitioning to HTML.

    For a long time, Google shipped its Chrome web browser built-in with Flash support, but it now looks like Chrome will slowly start blocking Flash content, require explicit permission from users, until upstream support is terminated three years from now, at the end of 2020. Google, like anyone else on this planet, believe HTML is faster, safer, and more power efficient than Flash, without a doubt.

  • Adobe Flash will die by 2020, Adobe and browser makers say

     

    For many, though, Flash was simply seen at least as a nuisance, and at worst a serious security risk. 
     

     

    Flash-based exploits have circulated for years, in a game of cat-and-mouse between hackers and Adobe itself. Apple's Steve Jobs famously banned Flash from the iPhone, claiming that Flash hurt battery life and also was a security risk. [...]

  • Adobe Flash is dead (well, nearly)

     

    Tech firms have long been hammering nail's into its coffin, too, and back in 2010, Steve Jobs famously penned a letter that called for the demise of Adobe Flash in favour of a shift to open web standards.

  • The end of Flash

IoT Framework for Edge Computing Gains Ground

Filed under
Linux
OSS
Web

In April, The Linux Foundation launched the open source EdgeX Foundry project to develop a standardized interoperability framework for Internet of Things (IoT) edge computing. Recently, EdgeX Foundry announced eight new members, bringing the total membership to 58.

The new members are Absolute, IoT Impact LABS, inwinSTACK, Parallel Machines, Queen’s University Belfast, RIOT, Toshiba Digital Solutions Corporation, and Tulip Interfaces. They join a roster that includes AMD, Analog Devices, Canonical/Ubuntu, Cloud Foundry, Dell, Linaro, Mocana, NetFoundry, Opto 22, RFMicron, and VMWare, among others.

EdgeX Foundry is built around Dell’s early stage, Apache 2.0 licensed FUSE IoT middleware framework, which offers more than a dozen microservices comprising over 125,000 lines of code. The Linux Foundation worked with Dell to launch the EdgeX Foundry after the FUSE project merged with a similar AllJoyn-compliant IoTX project led by current EdgeX members Two Bulls and Beechwood.

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Also: Tizen Experts Weekly News Recap – 23th July 2017

Android: NXP i.MX6 on Etnaviv Update

W3C and DRM, Net Neutrality Debate

Filed under
Web
  • W3C just fragmented the open internet with DRM - here's how we can fix it

    Last week, on the 6th of July, Tim Burners Lee approved the proposal for DRM in open web. He approved EME (Encrypted Media Extensions); which endorses non-free extensions to be built into the modern web so that HollyWood's content can be watched without challenging their view of technology.

  • We Must Keep the Internet Free and Open. EFF, Tech Giants, Startups and Internet Users Tell FCC: Don’t Sell Out Net Neutrality To Appease ISPs

    AirBnB, Amazon, ACLU, Google, Etsy, Y Combinator Among Organizations Standing Up To Government Plan To Let ISPs Block Content, Charge Fees for ‘Fast Lanes’

    San Francisco—The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) and a broad coalition of user advocacy groups and major technology companies and organizations joined forces today to protest the FCC’s plan to toss out net neutrality rules that preserve Internet freedom and prevent cable and telecommunications companies from controlling what we can see and do online.

    Without net neutrality, Internet service providers (ISPs) can block your favorite content, throttle or slow down Internet speeds to disadvantage competitors’ content, or make you pay more than you already do to access movies and other online entertainment.

  • The mere existence of the Net Neutrality debate is a symptom of a much, much deeper rabbit hole

    The problem is that politicians in the United States and some other places are giving communications monopolies and tax breaks to entrenched legacy industries – telco and cable – which have an enormous strategic incentive to prevent the Internet from ever reaching its potential, but pretend to embrace it.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

'Turbo Boost Max 3.0' and Mesa 17.2.4

  • Turbo Boost Max 3.0 Support For Skylake Fixed With Linux 4.15
    The platform-drivers-x86 updates have been sent in for Linux 4.15 and include a range of improvements for Intel hardware support. One of the bigger items is support for Skylake CPUs with Turbo Boost Max 3.0.
  • Mesa 17.2.4 Graphics Stack Lands for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 17.10 Gamers
    Canonical's Timo Aaltonen reports on the availability of the Mesa 17.2.4 open-source graphics drivers stack on the X-SWAT updates PPA for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 17.10 systems. Ubuntu systems have always lagged behind the development of the Mesa 3D Graphics Library, the Linux graphics stack containing open-source drivers for Intel, AMD Radeon, and Nvidia GPUs, but they usually catch up with it through a specially crafted PPA (Personal Package Archive) repository that can be easily installed by users.

OSS Leftovers

  • The Future of Marketing Technology Is Headed for an Open-Source Revolution
  • Edging Closer – ODS Sydney
    Despite the fact that OpenStack’s mission statement has not fundamentally changed since the inception of the project in 2010, we have found many different interpretations of the technology through the years. One of them was that OpenStack would be an all-inclusive anything-as-a-service, in a striking parallel to the many different definitions the “cloud” assumed at the time. At the OpenStack Developer Summit in Sydney, we found a project that is returning to its roots: scalable Infrastructure-as-a-Service. It turns out, that resonates well with its user base.
  • Firefox Quantum Now Available on openSUSE Tumbleweed, Linux 4.14 Coming Soon
    Users of the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system can now update their computers to the latest and greatest Firefox Quantum web browser.
  • Short Delay with WordPress 4.9
    You may have heard WordPress 4.9 is out. While this seems a good improvement over 4.8, it has a new editor that uses codemirror.  So what’s the problem? Well, inside codemirror is jshint and this has that idiotic no evil license. I think this was added in by WordPress, not codemirror itself. So basically WordPress 4.9 has a file, or actually a tiny part of a file that is non-free.  I’ll now have to delay the update of WordPress to hack that piece out, which probably means removing the javascript linter. Not ideal but that’s the way things go.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers