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Jitsi Without Google and Videoconferencing as Malware

Filed under
Web
  • Videoconferencing with #privacy

    Videoconferencing is on the rise worldwide with the COVID-19 crisis. But did you know that most videoconferencing software is NOT offering any guarantee about your privacy?

    Even some nice open source software such as Jitsi is relying on some Google services.

  • Zoom Is Leaking Emails And Photos Of Users

    It has reported that the popular video-conferencing app Zoom is leaking email addresses and photos of its users to the unknown people and Zoom is giving strangers the ability to attempt to start a video call with those users.

    Zoom Is Leaking Emails And Photos Of Users

    Zoom meetings are not end-to-end (E2E) encrypted. Zoom’s spokesperson told The Intercept, “It is not possible to enable E2E encryption for Zoom video meetings.”

    In E2E encryption, no one can read your conversation, not even the company.

WordPress 5.4 “Adderley”

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OSS
Web

Here it is! Named “Adderley” in honor of Nat Adderley, the latest and greatest version of WordPress is available for download or update in your dashboard.

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WordPress 5.4 RC5 and Load Balancing

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Server
OSS
Web
  • WordPress 5.4 RC5

    The fifth release candidate for WordPress 5.4 is live!

    WordPress 5.4 is currently scheduled to land on March 31 2020, and we need your help to get there—if you haven’t tried 5.4 yet, now is the time!

    You can test the WordPress 5.4 release candidate in two ways:

  • Best Performance WordPress with Google Cloud CDN and Load Balancing

    Best Performance WordPress with Google Cloud CDN and Load Balancing. Learn how to setup your WordPress application to handle high traffic with auto-scaling capabilities on Google Cloud Platform using HTTP(S) Layer 7 Load Balancing.

    In this guide you will install WordPress, configure your website to use Google Cloud Storage for media files, setup instance template, auto-scaling group to manage live traffic. You will also configure Google Cloud CDN for your website.

Tails Call for testing: 4.5~rc1

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Security
Web
Debian

Tails 4.5, scheduled for April 7, will be the first version of Tails to support Secure Boot.

You can help Tails by testing the release candidate for Tails 4.5 now.

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qBittorrent v4.2.2 release

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Software
Web

There's a "qBittorrent" app on the Windows Store which costs money. It isn't an official release nor it is coming from us. The person publicizing it doesn't have permission to use the qBittorrent name/logo.

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Also: qBittorrent 4.2.2 Released! How to Install it via PPA

Internet: Remote Work, Daniel Stenberg on Curl and QUIC/HTTP/3

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Software
Web
  • Our Essential List of Free Software for Remote Work

    Team chat has already become an essential tool for teams looking to be more collaborative and less reliant on email. At Purism we use Matrix for team chat, 1 to 1 calls, video conferencing via Jitsi (open source video conferencing), adhoc file sharing and all our community chat channels. Matrix is a distributed (federated) network, similar to email, which means you can communicate across Matrix servers and compatible services.

    You can self host Matrix or use a public instance like our own free Librem Chat service part of Librem One. All the goodness of Matrix conveniently hosted for you and accessible with one account that also gives you access to Librem Social, our hosted Mastodon instance, and our premium services: end-to-end encrypted email and VPN.

    [...]

    Most office-based teams already have email and things like a company newsletter but we thought we’d share how we manage ours. Our company email and Librem Mail are powered by Dovecot and we use GNU Mailman for our newsletter and mailing lists.

  • Daniel Stenberg: A curl dashboard

    When I wrote up my looong blog post for the curl’s 22nd anniversary, I vacuumed my home directories for all the leftover scripts and partial hacks I’d used in the past to produce graphs over all sorts of things in the curl project. Being slightly obsessed with graphs, that means I got a whole bunch of them.

    I made graphs with libreoffice

    I dusted them off and made sure they all created a decent CSV output that I could use. I imported that data into libreoffice’s calc spreadsheet program and created the graphs that way. That was fun and I was happy with the results – and I could also manually annotate them with additional info. I then created a new git repository for the purpose of hosting the statistics scripts and related tools and pushed my scripts to it. Well, at least all the ones that seemed to work and were the most fun.

    Having done the hard work once, it felt a little sad to just have that single moment snapshot of the project at the exact time I created the graphs, just before curl’s twenty-second birthday. Surely it would be cooler to have them updated automatically?

  • A QUIC look at HTTP/3

    Each HTTP session requires a TCP connection which, in turn, requires a three-way handshake to set up. Once that is done, "we can send data in a reliable data stream", Stenberg explained. TCP transmits data in the clear, so everyone can read what is transferred; the same thus holds true for the non-encrypted HTTP protocol. However, 80% of requests today are using the encrypted version, called Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure (HTTPS), according to statistics of Mozilla (Firefox users) and Google (Chrome users). "The web is getting more and more encrypted", Stenberg explained. HTTPS uses Transport Layer Security (TLS); it adds security on the top of the stack of protocols, which are (in order): IP, TCP, TLS, and HTTP. The cost of TLS is another handshake that increases the latency. In return, we get privacy, security, and "you know you're talking to the right server".

    HTTP/1 required clients to establish one new TCP connection per object, meaning that for each request, the browser needed to create a connection, send the request, read the response, then close it. "TCP is very inefficient in the beginning", Stenberg explained; connections transmit data slowly just after being established, then increase the speed until they discover what the link can support. With only one object to fetch before closing the connection, TCP was never getting up to speed. In addition, a typical web page includes many elements, including JavaScript files, images, stylesheets, and so on. Fetching one object at a time is slow, so browser developers responded by creating multiple connections in parallel.

    That created too many connections to be handled by the servers, so typically the number of connections for each client was limited. The browser had to choose which of its few allowed connections to use for the next object; that led to the so-called "head-of-line blocking" problem. Think of a supermarket checkout line; you might choose the one that looks shortest, only to be stuck behind a customer with some sort of complicated problem. A big TCP efficiency improvement was added for HTTP/1.1 in 1997: open TCP connections can be reused for other requests. That improved the slow-start problem, but not the head-of-line blocking issue, which can be made even worse.

Nextcloud: The Swiss Army Knife of Remote Working Tools

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Software
OSS
Web

Remote working culture has been booming for past few years in coding, graphics and other IT related fields. But the recent Coronavirus pandemic has made it mandatory for the companies to work from home if it’s possible for them.

While there are tons of tools to help you and your organization in working from home, let me share one open source software that has the features of several such tools combined into one.

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Comprehensive List of Web Browsers for Ubuntu

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Web
Ubuntu

In today’s modern age, there are a lot of web browsers to choose from, each offering something unique. To enjoy a great browsing experience, you must choose the right browser according to your needs. The following is a comprehensive list of web browsers for Ubuntu.

Firefox is and has always been the default web browser of Ubuntu. Founded in September of 2002, Firefox is a robust web browser. It is the main competitor of Chrome. In terms of privacy, it knocks Google out of the park. Firefox was declining, but it redeemed itself after it’s quantum update offering users a new beautiful UI and a lot of solid features. It also offers a lot of plugins.

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6 Best Web Photo Gallery Solutions

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Software
Web

There are many web services that allow users to upload pictures to a hosting site. The image host stores the images on its servers, and shows the individual different types of code to allow others to view that image. Popular examples include Flickr, Instagram, Imgur, Photobucket, SmugMug and Snapfish.

Most of these solutions provide free storage space, with more features available if you are willing to pay for a premium account. However, there are problems with these solutions. Leaving aside privacy and ownership issues, these services typically do not provide good integration with other platforms. There is a simple alternative which gives you more control and flexibility – self-hosted open source gallery software.

Anyone with a large photo collection will know that cataloging and finding a specific picture can be very time consuming. The purpose of this article is to identify Linux software that helps to host, organize, describe and share your collection by using a number of different techniques including tagging and albums. Good software makes the task of deciding which photos to keep and which to delete less time consuming.

To provide an insight into the quality of software that is available, we have compiled a list of 6 of the most useful open source web photo gallery software. Hopefully, there will be something of interest here for anyone who wants to host and share their photos. We give our strongest recommendation to Piwigo, Coppermine and Zenphoto but each of the solutions has something to offer.

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My top 6 open source frameworks for web development

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OSS
Web

There are a lot of backend frameworks that are open source and easily available, but not all of them offer great features. Backend frameworks are an essential part of website development, as they work as the nuts and bolts of a website. Basically, they handle everything behind the scenes of a website.

Backend frameworks have extensive libraries, APIs, web servers, and a lot more. They are responsible for the database, ensuring it makes proper communication with the front end and generates backend functionality.

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