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Nextcloud: The Swiss Army Knife of Remote Working Tools

Filed under
Software
OSS
Web

Remote working culture has been booming for past few years in coding, graphics and other IT related fields. But the recent Coronavirus pandemic has made it mandatory for the companies to work from home if it’s possible for them.

While there are tons of tools to help you and your organization in working from home, let me share one open source software that has the features of several such tools combined into one.

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Comprehensive List of Web Browsers for Ubuntu

Filed under
Web
Ubuntu

In today’s modern age, there are a lot of web browsers to choose from, each offering something unique. To enjoy a great browsing experience, you must choose the right browser according to your needs. The following is a comprehensive list of web browsers for Ubuntu.

Firefox is and has always been the default web browser of Ubuntu. Founded in September of 2002, Firefox is a robust web browser. It is the main competitor of Chrome. In terms of privacy, it knocks Google out of the park. Firefox was declining, but it redeemed itself after it’s quantum update offering users a new beautiful UI and a lot of solid features. It also offers a lot of plugins.

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6 Best Web Photo Gallery Solutions

Filed under
Software
Web

There are many web services that allow users to upload pictures to a hosting site. The image host stores the images on its servers, and shows the individual different types of code to allow others to view that image. Popular examples include Flickr, Instagram, Imgur, Photobucket, SmugMug and Snapfish.

Most of these solutions provide free storage space, with more features available if you are willing to pay for a premium account. However, there are problems with these solutions. Leaving aside privacy and ownership issues, these services typically do not provide good integration with other platforms. There is a simple alternative which gives you more control and flexibility – self-hosted open source gallery software.

Anyone with a large photo collection will know that cataloging and finding a specific picture can be very time consuming. The purpose of this article is to identify Linux software that helps to host, organize, describe and share your collection by using a number of different techniques including tagging and albums. Good software makes the task of deciding which photos to keep and which to delete less time consuming.

To provide an insight into the quality of software that is available, we have compiled a list of 6 of the most useful open source web photo gallery software. Hopefully, there will be something of interest here for anyone who wants to host and share their photos. We give our strongest recommendation to Piwigo, Coppermine and Zenphoto but each of the solutions has something to offer.

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My top 6 open source frameworks for web development

Filed under
OSS
Web

There are a lot of backend frameworks that are open source and easily available, but not all of them offer great features. Backend frameworks are an essential part of website development, as they work as the nuts and bolts of a website. Basically, they handle everything behind the scenes of a website.

Backend frameworks have extensive libraries, APIs, web servers, and a lot more. They are responsible for the database, ensuring it makes proper communication with the front end and generates backend functionality.

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Moving Away From WordPress and Third RC of WordPress 5.4

Filed under
OSS
Web
  • UnixTutorial.RU is Now Using Jekyll

    I have started WordPress to Jekyll migration for the Russian version of Unix Tutorial website – meaning UnixTutorial.RU has been running on Jekyll since last Sunday.

  • WordPress 5.4 RC3

    The third release candidate for WordPress 5.4 is now available!

    WordPress 5.4 is currently scheduled to be released on March 31 2020, and we need your help to get there—if you haven’t tried 5.4 yet, now is the time!

Moodle Based Business (LMS) Sold

Filed under
OSS
Web
  • Learning Technologies to acquire Moodle specialist, Open LMS

    Learning Technologies Group PLC (LON:LTG) is to acquire Open LMS, a big name in the world of Moodle, an open-source learning management system (LMS).

    Learning Technologies (LTG) is to pay US$31.7mln in cash to acquire Open LMS from Blackboard Inc. The acquisition will be funded from the group’s existing cash and bank facilities.

  • Blackboard Shifts Away From the Open Source Business By Selling Its Moodle Based Business

    Blackboard Inc. announced this week the sale of its Open LMS, a Moodle-based platform formerly known as Moodlerooms.

    The buyer is a London-based corporate education company Learning Technologies Group (LTG) for $31.7 million. The deal is expected to close during the second quarter.

    “The transaction enables Blackboard to further simplify its business and accelerate momentum in helping clients move to its Software as a Service (SaaS) deployment of Learn and Ultra,” said Bill Ballhaus, CEO at Blackboard.

  • Blackboard to Sell Open LMS Product (Formerly Moodlerooms) for $31.7 Million

    Blackboard, a Reston, Va.-based provider of learning management software for K-12, higher ed, government and businesses, has agreed to sell its Open LMS business to Learning Technologies Group, or LTG, a London-based conglomerate of workplace learning software services.

    LTG will pay $31.7 million for all intellectual property and assets related to the Open LMS, formerly called Moodlerooms and currently considered the largest commercial Moodle provider worldwide, according to a statement Tuesday. The deal is expected to close during the second quarter.

  • Blackboard to sell open-source LMS platform for $32M

    Open LMS is a software-as-a-service platform based on Moodle, an open-source LMS. By offloading the unit, Blackboard is shifting away from the open-source LMS market it once sought to serve.

    Meanwhile, for LTG, the acquisition is "a significant step" toward growing its position in the Moodle marketplace, the company said in a statement.

Chrome 80 Against Firefox 74/75 Performance On Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Google
Moz/FF
Web

Complementing the Firefox 73 vs. 74 vs. 75 Beta benchmarks on Ubuntu Linux from AMD Ryzen this week, here are those numbers side-by-side with the Google Chrome 80 web-browser for putting the performance into more perspective.

On the same Ryzen 9 3950X system with Ubuntu are the numbers for Firefox 73/74/75 both out-of-the-box and with WebRender force-enabled compared to Chrome 80 stable.

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Tor Browser 9.5a7 Released Today! More Speed & Bugs Fixed

Filed under
Security
Web

Tor Browser 9.5a7 Released: Tor is one of the best and most secured browser which allows you to browse the internet by hiding your personal information and data. With Tor browser, you will be able to surf to the website which are not available on the surface web. Yes, you can access the dark & deep websites using Tor browser. You can find more information about Tor browser from their official website.

The developer teams of the Tor browser announced that the Tor Browser 9.5a7 has been released. You can download the latest version of the tor browser 9.5a7 from their official website!

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WWW: Chrome OS 82, WebAssembly, JavaScript and Mozilla, Thunderbird and Instantbird Bits

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • The Linux terminal is getting a major overhaul and new features in Chrome OS 82

    It has been a busy morning here at the Chrome Unboxed office. Robby made the move over to the Dev channel yesterday and discovered a plethora of new and updated features. Some we’ve been expecting but others are appearing for the first time and a massive update to the Linux terminal is one of the biggest when we’re talking about the latter. For those taking advantage of Linux apps on Chrome OS, you’re familiar with the “terminal” app that looks pretty much like any Command Line Interface on any Linux distro. (Windows and Mac, for that matter.)

  • Google Bringing WebAssembly Extensions To Network Proxies

    In addition to WebAssembly's growing presence outside of the web browser thanks to various desktop run-times and interesting use-cases, WebAssembly is also popping up in other areas. Google has been working on WebAssembly support for extensions within network proxies typically reserved for C/C++ or the likes of Lua scripts.

    WebAssembly support has been pulled into their Istio service mesh v1.5 release with WASM extensions in the Envoy service proxy, popular choices for Cloud Native deployments. The Istio 1.5 release notes mention, "Wasm will give developers the ability to safely distribute and execute code in the Envoy proxy – to integrate with telemetry systems, policy systems, control routing and even transform the body of a message. It will be more flexible and more efficient, eliminating the need for running a Mixer component separately (which also simplifies deployments)."

  • JavaScript: The First 20 Years

    Our HOPL paper is done and submitted to the ACM for June 2020 publication in the PACMPL (Proceedings of the ACM on Programming Languages) and presentation at the HOPL 4 conference whenever it actually occurs. PACMPL is an open access journal so there won’t be a paywall preventing people from reading our paper. Regardless, starting right now you can access the preprint at https://zenodo.org/record/3707008. But before you run off and start reading this 190 page “paper” I want to talk a bit about HOPL.

  • Mozilla Addons Blog: Friend of Add-ons: Zhengping

    Please meet our newest Friend of Add-ons, Zhengping! A little more than two years ago, Zhengping decided to switch careers and become a software developer. After teaching himself the basics of web development, he started looking for real-world projects where he could hone his skills. After fixing a few frontend bugs on addons.mozilla.org (AMO), Zhengping began contributing code the add-ons code manager, a new tool to help keep add-on users safe.

    In the following months, he tackled increasingly harder issues, like using TypeScript with React to create complex UI with precision and efficiency. His contributions helped the add-ons team complete the first iteration of the code manager, and he continued to provide important patches based on feedback from add-on reviewers.

  • Patrick Cloke: Matrix Live Interview

    I was interviewed for Matrix Live as part of last week’s This Week in Matrix. I talked a bit about my background and my experiences contributing to Mozilla (as part of Instantbird and Thunderbird projects) as well as what I will be working on for Synapse, the reference implementation for Matrix servers.

  • Distributed Teams: Not Just Working From Home

    Technology companies taking curve-flattening exercises of late has resulted in me digging up my old 2017 talk about working as and working with remote employees. Though all of the advice in it holds up even these three years later, surprisingly little of it seemed all that relevant to the newly-working-from-home (WFH) multitudes.

    Thinking about it, I reasoned that it’s because the talk (slides are here if you want ’em) is actually more about working on a distributed team than working from home. Though it contained the usual WFH gems of “have a commute”, “connect with people”, “overcommunicate”, etc etc (things that others have explained much better than I ever will); it also spent a significant amount of its time talking about things that are only relevant if your team isn’t working in the same place.

Tails 4.4 Anonymous OS Released with Tor Browser 9.0.6

Filed under
OS
Web

Tails 4.4 comes one month after Tails 4.3, which added support for Trezor cryptocurrencies, to update some of the core components and default applications, as well as to address some important security vulnerabilities and other issues reported by users since the previous release.

Included in Tails 4.4 are the newest Tor Browser 9.0.6 anonymous web browser, which is based on Mozilla Firefox 68.6.0 ESR, Mozilla Thunderbird 68.5.0 email and news client, as well as the Linux 5.4.19 LTS kernel with better support for newer hardware.

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Firefly’s RK3399-based mini-PC can boot Ubuntu, Android, and media-savvy Station OS

Firefly’s “Station P1 Geek Mini PC” runs Ubuntu, Android, or an Android-based Station OS on an RK3399 and supports dual 4K displays. The price is $129 with 4GB LPDDR4 and 32GB eMMC or $179 with 4GB and 128GB. Since we covered Firefly’s Rockchip RK1808 based Core-1808-JD4 AI Core Board module and AIO-1808-JD4 dev kit in April, the company has launched a $129 and up Station P1 Geek Mini PC based on the Rockchip RK3399. Firefly, the community-backed SBC and compute module brand of T-Chip Technology, helped popularize the hexa-core Arm SoC with products such as its Firefly-RK3399, the world’s first RK3399 SBC. Read more

Screencasts and Audiocasts: MX Linux 19.2 Run Through, This Week in Linux and More

  • MX Linux 19.2 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at MX Linux 19.2. Enjoy!

  • This Week in Linux 105: 8GB RAM Raspberry Pi, Ardour 6.0, Audacity, Kali Linux, DirectX on Linux?

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, the Raspberry Pi Foundation announces a new 8GB RAM version of the Raspberry Pi and there’s a new release of Kali Linux. We’ve also got some big updates for two audio editors in Ardour 6.0 and Audacity 2.4.1. We’ve got a new version of the Enlightenment window manager with 0.24 and a new tool for making Bootable USBs called Ventoy. We’ve got an update on the GNOME “Patent Troll” Case, it’s been resolved. EA is releasing Source Code for 2 Command & Conquer Games. Microsoft is back in the news with 2 new items this week . . . one shows they may be really changing announcing DirectX for Linux . . . yea not really, of course there is a catch, it’s Microsoft. Also Microsoft figured that pretending they are doing something good for Linux wasn’t enough so they created a name collision with the Maui Project. All that and much more on Your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

  • LHS Episode #349: Docker Deep Dive

    Hello and welcome to Episode 349 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode, we take an in-depth look at the Docker containerization platform. We discuss all aspects of the project from how to install it to how to use it to where to get support when something goes awry. You can use docker to easily install and deploy applications, microservices, application stacks, scalable and resilient webapps and much more. We hope you enjoy our hopefully no-too-rambling look at the ease and power of Docker.

  • Extending The Life Of Python 2 Projects With Tauthon

    The divide between Python 2 and 3 lasted a long time, and in recent years all of the new features were added to version 3. To help bridge the gap and extend the viability of version 2 Naftali Harris created Tauthon, a fork of Python 2 that backports features from Python 3. In this episode he explains his motivation for creating it, the process of maintaining it and backporting features, and the ways that it is being used by developers who are unable to make the leap. This was an interesting look at how things might have been if the elusive Python 2.8 had been created as a more gentle transition.

today's howtos

Tails 4.7 is out

This release fixes many security vulnerabilities. You should upgrade as soon as possible. Read more