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Want to Ditch Zoom? Jitsi Offers an Open-Source Alternative

Filed under
OSS
Web

Chrome/Chromium 83 Beta and Chromium 81 for Slackware 14.2

Filed under
Slack
Web
Gaming
  • Chrome 83 Beta: Cross-site Scripting Protection, Improved Form Controls, and Safe Cross-origin Resource Sharing

    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome beta channel release for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, macOS, and Windows. Learn more about the features listed here through the provided links or from the list on ChromeStatus.com. Chrome 83 is beta as of April 16, 2020.

  • Chrome 83 Beta Rolls Out With Better Form Controls, Barcode Detection API

    Following the release of Chrome 81 earlier this month, Chrome 83 is now in beta with Google having skipped Chrome 82 due to delays / internal issues.

    Chrome 83 Beta is out today with trusted types for DOM manipulation, improved form controls that provide much nicer looking HTML input form controls by default, new origin trials, a barcode detection API is introduced as part of their shape detection API, various WebRTC improvements, and other changes.

  • Chromium 81 – and the new build process for Slackware 14.2

    Google released version 81 of their Chromium browser sources last week, after spending a lot of effort to bring security patches to the 80.x releases in the weeks before. As said before, Google is going to skip the 82 release entirely because of the staffing challenges resulting from the Corina crisis, and will jump straight to release 83 somewhere mid-May.
    I uploaded packages for chromium 81.0.4044.92 a few days ago – but those were only for Slackware-current.

    I found it impossible to compile the latest Chromium 81 code on Slackware 14.2 and I had been trying for days. Yesterday I finally succeeded after more than a week of trying since the sources were released. I can not sit behind my computer for long, but that was not too much of a setback in this particular case. I kept running into new compiler or linker errors, then I would think of a fix, set the box to compile again and had to wait for hours to see the result… and lie down in the meantime. For an entire week, I met failure upon failure.

Jitsi Meet in the News

Filed under
OSS
Web
  • This is what end-to-end encryption should look like!

    Some of the people watching our repos have been asking us what the deal was with this little new HIPS project (which by the way stands for Hidden In Plain Sight). Well, now you know! HIPS is about using a new Chrome WebRTC API called “Insertable Streams” to add a second layer of end-to-end encryption to media streams in a way that would make them inaccessible to the video router.

    While there is a ton of work left on getting authentication and key distribution to work, the project is already advanced enough for us to engage in two very important steps: [...]

  • What Is Jitsi and Is it More Secure Than Zoom?

    Online conference apps help to maintain business and family connections when you can’t all appear in the same room. There is a wealth of video conferencing and video chat apps to choose from. However, if you’re talking about personal matters or discussing the details of a business contract, you need to know the service you’re using will protect your privacy.

    Jitsi is an encrypted open-source video conferencing app you can use to protect your privacy. So, how does Jitsi compare to Zoom? Is Jitsi easy to use? Should you switch to Jitsi?

    Let’s take a look.

  • How to use Jitsi Meet, an open source Zoom alternative

    So you’re sick of Zoom.

    Maybe it’s the privacy issues, the security issues, or just the whole misrepresenting its encryption thing. Regardless of the specific reason, you know that there has to be a better video-conferencing tool out there, and you’re determined to find it. Enter Jitsi Meet.

    Much like Zoom, the free and open-source video-chat tool is easy to use and requires little-to-no onboarding. It’s also encrypted, and doesn’t sell your data. As an added bonus, you don’t need an account and you don’t need to download anything to start or join a meeting. Oh yeah, and it supports tile view.

    Here’s what you need to get started.

  • Jitsi Meet features update, April 2020

    While we work on making sure our infrastructure is able to cope with the recent surge in traffic, we have managed to ship some features we think you may like, let’s go!

Daniel Stenberg Commits to FTP, Unlike Mozilla Where He Came From; More Mozilla Bloggers Today

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web
  • Daniel Stenberg: curl is not removing FTP

    Mozilla also announced their plan for the deprecation of FTP in Firefox.

    Both browsers have paused or conditioned their efforts to not take the final steps during the Covid-19 outbreak, but they will continue and the outcome is given: FTP support in browsers is going away. Soon.

  • Eric Shepherd: Welcome to remote working

    First, let’s get the most important part out of the way: I hope you and yours are faring as well as possible during these difficult times. Though much of what’s happening was inescapable, enough mistakes were made that we find ourselves in an essentially generation-defining crisis. This is the time my daughter will point at and tell her kids, “You think you have it rough? Back in my day…”

    Please do everything you can to contain the spread of COVID-19. Stay home to the greatest possible extent.Don’t have visitors, or go out visiting others, and if you must interact with other people, stay as far apart as can be managed—at least six feet—and don’t allow your hands or face to come into contact with anything that others have touched. And, of course, wash those hands. A lot.

  • Alex Gibson: My seventh year working at Mozilla

    This week marks my seventh year working full time for Mozilla. The past year has been good for me personally and professionally, but it has also been an uneasy time for both Mozilla and the world as a whole. I write this post under lockdown during to the COVID-19 pandemic, which is a very testing time for many people and organizations around the world. I’m thankful to still have a stable job, and to have the protection of being able to work from home. I’m more aware of my privilege now than ever before.

  • Nicholas Nethercote: Better stack fixing for Firefox

    I recently undertook a project to improve the stack fixing tools used for Firefox. This has resulted in some large performance wins (e.g. 10x-100x) and a significant improvement in code quality. The story involves Rust, Python, executable and debug info formats, Taskcluster, and many unexpected complications.

Side By Side Comparison Between GAFAM And Alternative World

Filed under
Server
Web

This is a list of good alternatives to GAFAM online services in ways understandable by people without deep knowledge about computer. By "Gafam" I mean popular online services of Google, Facebook, and alike and by "Alternative World" I mean Free Software-based challenging services of SearX, Mastodon, PeerTube, and alike. You can find here the new term Fediverse is sided with Alternative World. I hope this short article helps everybody to try out our Alternative World. Enjoy!

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An introduction to Cockpit, a browser-based administration tool for Linux

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat
Web

Cockpit is a server administration tool sponsored by Red Hat, focused on providing a modern-looking and user-friendly interface to manage and administer servers. Fedora 21 included Cockpit by default, and since then, it has continued to grow and mature. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 included Cockpit in the optional and extras repositories, and it’s included in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 by default.

Cockpit is not the first of its class (many old-time system administrators may remember Webmin), but the alternatives are usually clunky, bloated, and their underlying APIs may be a security risk. That’s where Cockpit is different and shines. With Cockpit, unnecessary services or APIs don’t get in the way of doing things.

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Between Software and Service

Filed under
Software
Web

I write this article to explain the connection between software and service on the internet as my articles often mention them. The intended audience are people without deep knowledge in computing. This kind of explanation is needed because the computing is not as simple as one may thought. For example, one should be able to distinguish between WordPress the software and WordPress the service, so everything would be clear and no misunderstanding could happen in the future. Another example, one should be able to distinguish between PeerTube, Mastodon, and Jitsi the software with those three the services. My articles here which mentions such things are for example Riot/Matrix Intro, Alternative-World Resources, Code Hosting list, and Stay at Home Solution the series, among others. This explanation is wished to be useful too to understand circumstances outside of this UbuntuBuzz.com website. Happy learning!

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Jit.si if you care and Zoom if you don’t.

Filed under
OSS
Security
Web

So, last week, from 8th April onwards, the Singapore Government imposed a partial lockdown (PL) – or as they say euphemistically “circuit breaker” (CB).

The Singapore Ministry of Education introduced Home-based Learning (HBL) that they had initially trialed from early April with a once a week HBL setup.

And that was the week of 30th March.

But following the PL, all schools were closed and all 500k students and I guess 40k teachers had to switch to full-on HBL using online tools, especially Zoom.

Then this happened. So, a classroom was zoombombed. As expected, the Ministry of Education suspended the use of Zoom.

Sigh.

Let me offer the following to all of those who are using Zoom.

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New Release: Tor Browser 9.0.9

Filed under
Moz/FF
Security
Web

or Browser 9.0.9 is now available from the Tor Browser download page and also from our distribution directory.

This release is updating Firefox to 68.7.0esr, NoScript to 11.0.23 and OpenSSL to 1.1.1f.

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Staying "safe" while you stream: DBD's tips on living DRM-free during quarantine

Filed under
GNU
Web

As most of us are cooped up in our homes due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, it's somewhat natural that we turn to online movies, music, and other media to help pass the time. For most people, this involves turning to Internet streaming for convenient, "all-in-one" services that promise an endless array of recommendations to while away the hours. "Binging" is all well and good every once in a while, but we should remain careful that the ways we're getting our media don't come with compromises to our freedom. As we've mentioned before, Netflix and other giant media providers are responsible for keeping the practice of DRM (Digital Restrictions Management) alive, and it's important not to provide them with the subscription fees they need to keep going. It's also important, even under less dire circumstances, to support businesses and Web sites that provide DRM-free media, and to promote them to our friends. So to help provide you with a plethora of DRM-free and often gratis places to stream from while keeping your rights, here's a few choice selections from our Guide to DRM-free Living.

When it comes to finding good videos to watch during times of crisis, we'd be remiss if we didn't mention the Internet Archive. This section of the digital library contains bona-fide cinematic masterpieces like Nosferatu, as well as "classics" of a different sort like Plan 9 from Outer Space. Many of these works have been voluntarily uploaded to the Archive by their creators, or, like Night of the Living Dead, have fallen into the public domain due to some of the vagaries and finer points in United States copyright law.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • What sort of SSH keys our users use or have listed in their authorized keys files

    My first surprise is that we have so many DSA keys listed, since they're no longer supported (and those 380 ssh-dss keys are across 203 different people). People clearly don't clean out their authorized keys files very often. 670 people have RSA keys, 13 have Ed25519 keys, and 15 have some form of ECDSA keys (which implies that a few people list a bunch of ECDSA keys).

    However, that's just what people have sitting around in their authorized keys files, not what actually gets used. What actually gets used is a somewhat different picture. Here are the numbers for how many different keys of each type have been used over the course of 2020 so far: [...]

  • Microsoft is blocking the Windows 10 May 2020 Update on lots of devices [Ed: Microsoft cannot even patch its own software without breaking it]

    Microsoft is preventing a large number of devices from updating to the Windows 10 May 2020 Update. While the software company released the update last week, Microsoft has quietly acknowledged that there are a number of known issues preventing the update from being installed on a variety of PCs. Microsoft has a list of 10 issues it’s currently investigating, and 9 of them have resulted in a “compatibility hold” which stops the Windows 10 May 2020 Update from being installed via Windows Update. One issue involving unexpected errors or reboots with always-on, always-connected devices, affects devices like Microsoft’s Surface Pro 7 or Surface Laptop 3.

  • Security updates for Tuesday

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (ant, bind, freerdp, and unbound), CentOS (bind, freerdp, and git), Debian (python-httplib2), Fedora (ant, kernel, sqlite, and sympa), openSUSE (java-11-openjdk and qemu), Oracle (bind), Red Hat (freerdp), Scientific Linux (python-pip and python-virtualenv), Slackware (firefox), SUSE (qemu), and Ubuntu (Apache Ant, ca-certificates, flask, and freerdp2).

Android Leftovers

Mozilla Firefox 77 Is Now Available for Download, Here’s What’s New

Highlights of the Firefox 77 release include improved accessibility by allowing screen reader users to access the applications list in Firefox Options, providing labels for date/time inputs for users of accessibility tools and updated text in the JAWS screen reader for some live regions. This release also implements support for viewing and managing web certificates via a new about:certificate page, and adds Pocket recommendations on the New Tab page for users located in the United Kingdom (UK). Among other changes, Firefox 77 removes the browser.urlbar.oneOffSearches preference. Users will now have to uncheck the search engines on the One-Click Search Engines option in the about:preferences#search page if they want to hide the one-off search buttons. Read more Direct: 77.0 Firefox Release Also: Firefox 77 Released With Security Fixes, AV1 Image File Support Firefox 77.0 Released with Pocket Recommendations for UK users Firefox 77.0

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

  • Red Hat OpenShift 4 now available on IBM Power Systems

    Clients can exploit the unique capabilities of OpenShift 4 to incrementally modernize the capabilities of their IT infrastructure and streamline their deployment of cloud native applications with continuous integration and deployment. They will be primed to exploit the performance of the Power architecture as they begin to infuse AI and ML insights and Open Source innovations into Linux® applications running on Power Systems. OpenShift 4 combines the industry’s most comprehensive and trusted enterprise container and Kubernetes platform with single step installation, automated upgrades and lifecycle management for every part of our client’s container stack.

  • How to scale an open, energetic community

    Now we're undergoing what may be our largest evolution yet. We're reimagining our mission and vision. We're re-branding. We're renovating our spaces of community conversation and collaboration. We're recruiting new contributors. We're implementing new governance structures to make the project more inclusive. It's incredibly exciting. And in this series, members of the Open Organization project will share the community's journey with you—so you can see firsthand how community evolutions occur, how tough they can be, and how rewarding they become.

  • Ben Williams: F32-20200601 Updated Live isos Released

    The Fedora Respins SIG is pleased to announce the latest release of Updated F32-20200518-Live ISOs, carrying the 5.6.14-300 kernel. Welcome to Fedora 32. This set of updated isos will save considerable amounts of updates after install. ((for new installs.)(New installs of Workstation have about 840+MB of updates)). A huge thank you goes out to irc nicks dowdle, Southern-Gentleman for testing these iso.

  • Insights into hybrid cloud: Here's what to consider

    Our interactions with businesses can happen in person, on the web, on our mobile devices, in marketplaces or via APIs. To enable these interactions, IT organizations are increasingly being driven towards hybrid IT architectures involving private cloud, public cloud, edge computing, AI/ML and more to provide multiple different routes to the customer. This mixed use of public and private clouds, possibly with some degree of workload portability, integration, orchestration, and unified management across those clouds is often referred to as hybrid cloud computing. Research shows that improving business agility and increasing IT agility are key drivers for organizations that are implementing a hybrid cloud strategy.