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Vivaldi 1.8

Filed under
OSS
Web

Plesk teams with Kolab for open source groupware

Filed under
OSS
Web

Plesk, one of the major providers of website management solutions, has chosen Kolab Systems’ groupware solution for its millions of users.

"You can now deploy Kolab in your Plesk installation with the Premium Email powered by Kolab extension. this extension is a step forward in the field of turn key groupware and online collaboration software. This package is easy and convenient to deploy — it can literally be installed in a few clicks, and it provides full Kolab functionality without the inconveniences and potential pitfalls of having to install Kolab from the ground up," said Kolab Systems in a press release.

This deal shows us why smart companies put their eggs in the open source basket instead of relying on proprietary solutions.

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Chromium and Chrome

Filed under
Google
OSS
Web
  • Chromium Rolls Out Enhanced GTK3 Theme Support

    Chromium is sporting greater GTK3 support in its latest daily development snapshots. Developers have begun building the browser with proper GTK3 theme integration enabled by default. I know: hardly ground breaking, but as Chromium (and its more popular sibling, Google Chrome) are widely used by Ubuntu users, it’s a change worth a note.

  • Chrome 58 Beta: IndexedDB 2.0, an improvement to iframe navigation, and immersive full screen for PWAs

    The IndexedDB 2.0 standard is now fully supported in Chrome, making it simpler to work with large data sets in the browser. IDB 2.0 features new schema management, bulk action methods, and more standardized handling of failures.

  • Chrome 58 Beta Supports IndexedDB 2.0, New Developer Features

    Google developers are busy today not only with the Android O Developer Preview but the Chrome team has delivered the first public beta for the upcoming Chrome 58.0.

    The Chrome 58 beta adds full support for IndexedDB 2.0, improvements to iframe navigation by adding a new sandbox keyword to control iframe top navigation behavior, immersive full-screen support for Progressive Web Apps (PWAs), and various other developer changes.

Chrome and Firefox

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web

Tor Browser 6.5 Gets First Point Release to Support Tor 0.2.9.10, OpenSSL 1.0.2k

Filed under
OSS
Web

The Tor Project announced the immediate availability of the first point release of the Tor Browser 6.5 stable branch of the open-source, Firefox-based anonymity web browser with enhanced security and privacy features based on Tor.

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Microsoft’s browsers are shedding users, new Firefox for Ubuntu, Firefox axes Windows XP support

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web

Node.js Coverage

Filed under
Development
Web
  • Node.js: A project for casual contributors

    I sat down at the Open Source Leadership Summit to record a podcast with Mikeal Rogers, who heads the Node.js Foundation, a collaborative project under the Linux Foundation. He observed that one of the characteristics of Node.js and its community is that it's a "post-GitHub platform," meaning "the first release of Node.js and the first code written on Node.js were in a GitHub repository. That's the environment we live in, so we had to come up with some newer ways of managing the project that are unique to this newer and more modern open source."

  • Tune Up Your Code with the Crankshaft Compiler

    Safia Abdalla is an open source developer and a maintainer on a project called nteract, but her pet topic is compilers. And, in her talk at Node.js Interactive, Abdalla explained the inner workings of the V8 compiler and how it can optimize the code it gets fed. Although Abdalla specifically focused on what goes on in the V8 compiler, she noted that there are many similarities to other compilers.

What's the fastest Linux web browser?

Filed under
Linux
Web

Firefox is easily the most popular Linux web browser. In the recent LinuxQuestions survey, Firefox took first place with 51.7 percent of the vote. Chrome came in second with a mere 15.67 percent. The other browsers all had, at most, scores in single percentages. But is Firefox really the fastest browser? I put them them to the test, and here's what I found.

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Open source web servers | NGINX, Apache, Lighttpd and more

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OSS
Web

Web servers have come a long way since the CERN httpd was developed by Tim Berners-Lee in 1990 as part of the same project that resulted in the first ever web browser.

Some of the leading suppliers of web servers today provide closed source enterprise-level options for enterprises, but many others retain the open values embodied by Tim Berners-Lee and the decision to release the source code for CERN httpd into the public domain in 1993.

Computerworld UK looks at the best open source web servers currently available for enterprises.

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OpenSUSE Web Site Cracked, Tumbleweed Update

Filed under
Security
Web
SUSE
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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Security Tips for Installing Linux on Your SysAdmin Workstation
    Once you’ve chosen a Linux distro that meets all the security guidelines set out in our last article, you’ll need to install the distro on your workstation.
  • Fedora 26 crypto policy Test Day today (2017-03-30)!
  • Open-source developers targeted in sophisticated malware attack
    For the past few months, developers who publish their code on GitHub have been targeted in an attack campaign that uses a little-known but potent cyberespionage malware. The attacks started in January and consisted of malicious emails specifically crafted to attract the attention of developers, such as requests for help with development projects and offers of payment for custom programming jobs. The emails had .gz attachments that contained Word documents with malicious macro code attached. If allowed to execute, the macro code executed a PowerShell script that reached out to a remote server and downloaded a malware program known as Dimnie.
  • A scramble at Cisco exposes uncomfortable truths about U.S. cyber defense
    When WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange disclosed earlier this month that his anti-secrecy group had obtained CIA tools for hacking into technology products made by U.S. companies, security engineers at Cisco Systems (CSCO.O) swung into action. The Wikileaks documents described how the Central Intelligence Agency had learned more than a year ago how to exploit flaws in Cisco's widely used Internet switches, which direct electronic traffic, to enable eavesdropping. Senior Cisco managers immediately reassigned staff from other projects to figure out how the CIA hacking tricks worked, so they could help customers patch their systems and prevent criminal hackers or spies from using the same methods, three employees told Reuters on condition of anonymity.
  • NTPsec: a Secure, Hardened NTP Implementation
    Network time synchronization—aligning your computer's clock to the same Universal Coordinated Time (UTC) that everyone else is using—is both necessary and a hard problem. Many internet protocols rely on being able to exchange UTC timestamps accurate to small tolerances, but the clock crystal in your computer drifts (its frequency varies by temperature), so it needs occasional adjustments. That's where life gets complicated. Sure, you can get another computer to tell you what time it thinks it is, but if you don't know how long that packet took to get to you, the report isn't very useful. On top of that, its clock might be broken—or lying. To get anywhere, you need to exchange packets with several computers that allow you to compare your notion of UTC with theirs, estimate network delays, apply statistical cluster analysis to the resulting inputs to get a plausible approximation of real UTC, and then adjust your local clock to it. Generally speaking, you can get sustained accuracy to on the close order of 10 milliseconds this way, although asymmetrical routing delays can make it much worse if you're in a bad neighborhood of the internet.
  • Zelda Coatings
    I assume that every permutation of scams will eventually be tried; it is interesting that the initial ones preyed on people's avarice and dishonesty: "I will transfer millions to your bank account, then you share with me" - with subsequent scams appealing to another demographic: "I want to donate a large sum to your religious charity" - to perhaps capture a more virtuous but still credulous lot. Where will it end ?

Tizen and Android

Linux and Linux Foundation

Mesa and Intel Graphics