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Chrome, Flow, and Chromium

Filed under
Google
Web
  • 25 Best Chrome Flags You Should Enable To Optimize Your Browsing

    Google Chrome has become the most popular web browser because of its simplicity and speed. Besides, it has lots of excellent features, including some hidden features that boost your browsing experience. Chrome flags are the hidden feature tools that tweak your Chrome UI and performance by changing Chrome settings. This is basically an experimental feature tested on Chrome OS, but it is available in the trial. If you want to learn more techniques about boosting your browsing experience, you need to follow our complete guidelines to enable a flag.

    However, no flag ensures stable performance. Moreover, finding bugs is a widespread occurrence in a flag. Besides, it would be best if you considered that flags are not tested on online security. So it takes a little bit of risk of using a flag. If you want to experience the cutting edge of Chrome by taking small risks, let’s talk with the 25 best Chrome flags.

  • Crank up the volume on that Pixies album: Time to exercise your Raspberry Pi with an... alternative browser

    While browser-makers squabble over standards, privacy and exactly what their User-Agent string should say, Ekioh's clean-room browser, Flow, has continued to quietly advance.

    The Register last looked at Flow over Christmas 2020 and we came away impressed with the work in progress, not least its speed and the lack of data slurpage. There were, however, problems, one of which was that Google's web applications were not entirely happy.

    In a lengthy blog post Ekioh's CEO, Piers Wombwell, explained the hoops that need to be jumped through in order to persuade Google Docs to run acceptably. While a canvas-based approach is inbound, getting the current incarnation up and running necessitated some head-scratching from the Flow team and demanded fixes. Sure – Google Docs seemed to load OK, although there was no word-wrap. But could you type into it? Nope.

  • Another attempt to compile Chromium [Ed: Web browsers have become overly bloated crap that takes away freedom, even when some code is available and liberally licensed]

    Over the years, I have made a few attempts to compile Chromium. One of those, in 2019, I posted about it:

    https://bkhome.org/news/201910/attempted-to-compile-chromium.html

    Yesterday, thought would try again. Tried and tried to download the source from the Chromium project on github, but it kept failing. The download is huge, over 1GB, and when it failed, when unable to continue, a restart from the beginning is required. This is the case when using gn "fetch --nohooks --no-history chromium" or when using wget -- in both cases, cannot continue from the point of failure.

    My contract with Vodafone is 40GB per month (on my phone), a fixed price with unlimited downloads -- but it drops to a considerably slower speed when exceed 40GB. So don't want to have too many 1GB download failures.

    So I downloaded the source from the Arch Linux repo, which was a 991MB tarball, no problem downloading. Version 93.0.4577.82.

Can You Use Tor on Linux?

Filed under
Linux
Security
Web

Big businesses are willing to pay top dollars to find access to your sensitive data to design targeted ads. What’s scary is that there are criminals also prowling in the shadows for this information. You must protect yourself. Installing browsers like Tor that ensure online anonymity greatly boost your privacy and security. Downloading a VPN offers greater privacy hiding your identity on the internet. Keep the nosy snoopers away with Tor.

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Try this Linux web browser dedicated solely to web applications

Filed under
Linux
Web

When I'm on the go, I need everything to work as efficiently as possible. And although you might be thinking, "But a web browser is as efficient as it gets, right?" That depends on what task you're doing and what site you're working with.

This is especially so in the modern age of web applications and with constantly on-the-move staff. Instead of always having a full-blown, kitchen-sink-type web browser, sometimes we need something a bit more stripped-down, a tool that is geared toward one thing and one thing only—web applications.

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Mozilla and Chrome Issues

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • The Talospace Project: Firefox 92 on POWER

    Firefox 92 is out. Alongside some solid DOM and CSS improvements, the most interesting bug fix I noticed was a patch for open alerts slowing down other tabs in the same process. In the absence of a JIT we rely heavily on Firefox's multiprocessor capabilities to make the most of our multicore beasts, and this apparently benefits (among others, but in particular) the Google sites we unfortunately have to use in these less-free times. I should note for the record that on this dual-8 Talos II (64 hardware threads) I have dom.ipc.processCount modestly increased to 12 from the default of 8 to take a little more advantage of the system when idle, which also takes down fewer tabs in the rare cases when a content process bombs out. The delay in posting this was waiting for the firefox-appmenu patches, but I decided to just build it now and add those in later. The .mozconfigs and LTO-PGO patches are unchanged from Firefox 90/91.

  • Mozilla bypasses Microsoft, makes it easier to set Firefox as default browser in Windows

    Changing the default apps such as browsers in Microsoft Windows 10 is not a straightforward process. While this means that users have to jump through extra hoops to set up, let's say, Mozilla Firefox as their default browser, it also means that vendors such as Mozilla face more competition from Microsoft's own offering, which is Edge. The bad news is that in Windows 11, this is becoming even more cumbersome for end-users and vendors as the OS requires users to change the default browser for each type of extension individually.

  • Firefox 94 will change the output for X11 to use EGL by default

    A nightly builds build that will on the Firefox 94 release to added to the change has been include a new rendering backend by default for graphical environments that use the X11 protocol. The new backend is notable for the use of the interface for displaying graphics EGL instead of GLX. The backend supports the open source Mesa 21.x OpenGL drivers and the proprietary NVIDIA 470.x drivers. AMD proprietary OpenGL drivers are not yet supported.

    "A nightly builds build that will on the #Firefox 94 release to added to the change has been include a new rendering backend by default for graphical environments that use the X11 protocol." https://www.itsfoss.net/firefox-94-will-change-the-output-for-x11-to-use-egl-by-default/

  • Chrome update 93.0.4577.82 fixing 0-day vulnerabilities

    Google has formed a Chrome 93.0.4577.82 update, which fixes 11 vulnerabilities, including two issues already used by hackers exploits (0-day). The details have not yet been disclosed, it is only known that the first vulnerability (CVE-2021-30632) is caused by an error leading to an out-of-buffer write in the V8 JavaScript engine, and the second problem (CVE-2021-30633) is present in the Indexed DB API implementation and is connected with access to the memory area after its release (use-after-free).

  • Google Releases Security Updates for Chrome

    Google has released Chrome version 93.0.4577.82 for Windows, Mac, and Linux. This version addresses vulnerabilities that an attacker could exploit to take control of an affected system.

visurf, a web browser based on NetSurf

Filed under
Web

I’ve started a new side project that I would like to share with you: visurf. visurf, or nsvi, is a NetSurf frontend which provides vi-inspired key bindings and a lightweight Wayland UI with few dependencies. It’s still a work-in-progress, and is not ready for general use yet. I’m letting you know about it today in case you find it interesting and want to help.

NetSurf is a project which has been on my radar for some time. It is a small web browser engine, developed in C independently of the lineage of WebKit and Gecko which defines the modern web today. It mostly supports HTML4 and CSS2, plus only a small amount of HTML5 and CSS3. Its JavaScript support, while present, is very limited. Given the epidemic of complexity in the modern web, I am pleased by the idea of a small browser, more limited in scope, which perhaps requires the cooperation of like-minded websites to support a pleasant experience.

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Here’s Why Firefox is Seeing a Continuous Decline for Last 12 Years

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web

There has been a lot of discussion lately about the decline of the Firefox browser and numerous articles about it losing 50 Million users in the last two years.

But the real decline has been over 12 years with a total loss of half a Billion users and 75% of the market share it once held.

It all started in 2009 Q3 with the fateful decision to force…

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Alternative Linux Browsers for Linux

Filed under
Web

Browsing the Internet is the most common use of computers these days. The Internet has become a part of our daily lives, and imagining a life without it does seem difficult. To browse the Internet, there are specially designed applications called “web browsers”. There are several web browsers such as Opera, Chrome, Firefox, etc., available. And, as is the case with all technology, some are better than others.
For Linux Distros, Mozilla Firefox is built-in and available for use on installing the OS. Mozilla Firefox is considered to be an excellent web browser, and most users are satisfied with it. However, options are available for users who want to use or prefer using another web browser rather than Firefox.

Consider Google Chrome, the outright most used web browser in the world. Being affiliated with Google makes Chrome an attractive and easy-to-use browser. Add to it the various plug-ins and add-ons; it does become the superior choice.

In the case of Opera, some users prefer using it over others. Opera is also a user-friendly and easy-to-use web browser. Recently, Opera has introduced a VPN feature which has helped its prospects even further.

So, if you are looking to find an alternative web browser for your Linux system, you have come to the right place as this article will be explaining the steps to install different web browsers and which browser is the best choice.

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Forget Firefox, Vivaldi Steals Default Browser Spot In Popular Linux Distro

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web

Arch-based Linux distribution Manjaro is no stranger to making bold decisions that may or may not ruffle the community’s collective feathers. In 2019 it disrupted the status quo by replacing LibreOffice with FreeOffice as the default office software (and then decided to give users a choice during OS installation). Today, Manjaro is orchestrating another upheaval: it’s replacing its default web browser.

Firefox is out. Vivaldi is in.

“In our repos, Manjaro always provides the very latest version of Vivaldi, and thanks to direct developer contact we are now also able to include matching default themes for our editions,” says Co-CEO of Manjaro GmbH & Co. KG, Bernhard Landauer. “To give Vivaldi more of the attention it deserves, I decided to include it as the default browser in our popular Cinnamon Community Edition. With its remarkable browsing speed, exceptional customizability, and especially the way it values user privacy, Vivaldi for me is a perfect match for Manjaro Linux.”

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Best 18 Open-source Flat-File CMSs in 2021

Filed under
Server
Web

A Flat-file CMS is a content management system that does not use any database, in other term "Databaseless". It stores its content in text files like: Markdown, TXT, JSON or even XML.

In this article, we listed a neat collection of Flat-file publishing systems which serve many purposes starting from blogging, documentation projects to enterprise websites.

I have always been fascinated by databaseless solutions, which I tend to use and recommend to my clients, and flat-file CMSs are not an exception.

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Best Web Browsers for Ubuntu and Other Linux Distributions

Filed under
Web
Ubuntu

There is no such thing as the perfect web browser. It all depends on what you prefer and what you use it for.

But, what are your best options when it comes to web browsers for Linux?

In this article, I try to highlight the best web browsers that you can pick for Ubuntu and other Linux.

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More in Tux Machines

Privacy-focused Linux Distributions to Secure Your Online Presence in 2021

Linux distros are usually more secure than their Windows and Mac counterparts. Linux Operating Systems being open-source leaves very less scope of unauthorized access to its core. However, with the advancement of technologies, incidents of attacks are not rare. Are you in a fix with the coming reports of Linux systems targeted malware attacks? Worried about your online presence? Then maybe it’s time to go for a secure, privacy-focused Linux distro. This article presents a guide to 3 privacy-oriented Linux distributions that respect your privacy online. Read more

Stable Kernels: 5.14.7, 5.10.68, 5.4.148, 4.19.207, 4.14.247, 4.9.283, and 4.4.284

I'm announcing the release of the 5.14.7 kernel.

All users of the 5.14 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 5.14.y git tree can be found at:
	git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.14.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
	https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

thanks,

greg k-h
Read more Also: Linux 5.10.68 Linux 5.4.148 Linux 4.19.207 Linux 4.14.247 Linux 4.9.283 Linux 4.4.284

i.MX8M Nano based mini-PC features Wirepas mesh networking

SolidRun’s $221-and-up “SolidSense N8 IoT Compact” mini-PC runs Linux on an i.MX8M Nano Solo with GbE, WiFi/BT, USB, and a choice of LTE or PoE. You also get a choice of RS485 with CAN or BLE 5.0 with Wirepas Massive. The SolidSense N8 IoT Compact embedded system follows SolidRun’s i.MX6-based SolidSense N6 Edge Gateway, which similarly offers a bundle of the Wirepas wireless mesh software from Tampere, Finland based Wirepas. The wireless mesh software, which is now called Wirepas Massive, is pre-installed along with software defined radios (SDRs) on two of the four i.MX8M Nano based SolidSense N8 models. Applications include IoT tasks such as automation, asset tracking, security, and smart buildings. Read more

AMD Ryzen processors are getting a performance boost on Linux

Chip giant AMD has shared details about a new driver that promises to improve the performance of its Zen-based processors on Linux. According to reports, the new driver is the result of a joint collaboration between AMD and Valve, with the two companies toiling to enhance performance and power efficiency reportedly in preparation for the launch of the Steam Deck, Valve’s Zen 2-based take on portable gaming. Read more