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Brave browser switches to Chromium code base

Filed under
Google
OSS
Web
  • Brave browser switches to Chromium code base for faster performance

    While Brave used Chromium’s back-end code since its inception in 2016, it used the Muon library for its UI. The company says that the new code base translates to a 22-percent performance improvement. It added that users should notice an 8-to-10-second gain on website load times, as compared to the previous version.

  • Brave browser switches base code to Chromium

    Brave browser has announced that it will fully switch to a Chromium base in its latest release, TheNextWeb reports.

    Brave used Chromium code since its inception in 2016, but used the Muon library for its UI.

    Brave joins the likes of Chrome, Edge, Opera, and Vivaldi to use Google’s open source Chromium as the base code for their browser.

    Version 0.57, the upcoming version that will use Chromium, will also support Chrome extensions and will categorise extensions as “allowed and vetted”, “allowed and unvetted”, and “blocked.”

Happy birthday, qutebrowser!

Filed under
Software
Web

That's how qutebrowser looked a day after that (and that commit still seems to run!): https://imgur.com/a/xoG1r4G

Exactly a year later, things were finally ready for a v0.1 release, after spending two weeks of holidays with fixing bugs.

Originally, qutebrowser was born because the dwb project was discontinued: https://portix.bitbucket.io/dwb/

That's what I (and many others) were using at the time, and all alternatives were stuck with an unmaintained WebKit1. Since everything was using WebKitGTK which was horribly buggy (and WebKit2 in WebKitGTK lacked a lot of basic features), I decided to start my own thing, based on Qt instead.

Back then, there were already discussions about QtWebEngine, and I originally wondered whether I should just wait with starting qutebrowser until it's ready. QtWebEngine support was finally added in July 2016, a lot later than I imagined. Initially, many features didn't work yet, but in September 2017 it finally became the default backend.

Later, it turned out that qutebrowser also was a viable alternative for many Pentadactyl/Vimperator refugees, and qutebrowser got more popular than I ever imagined.

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Proprietary Browsers That Run on GNU/Linux

Filed under
Web
  • Opera launches a cryptocurrency wallet in its Android browser [Ed: Would you trust a proprietary Chinese browser with your cryptocurrency wallet? On a platform with (intentional) back doors?]

    Web browser Opera has launched a built-in cryptocurrency wallet on its Android app, the company announced today at a blockchain event in London. The wallet will first support ethereum, with support for other coins likely to come later. Ether investors using Opera would potentially be able to more easily access their tokens using the feature.

  • Latest Vivaldi Update Adds Pop Out Video, Tab Sessions + More

    A new version of the Vivaldi web browser has been released — and it’s even more customisable than before!

    The Vivaldi 2.2 update adds a “pop out” video player feature (just like the picture-in-picture feature available in Chrome), introduces new ways to manage tabs, and — at long last! — gives you control over which buttons appear in the main browser toolbar.

  • Vivaldi 2.2: Focus on details
  • Vivaldi Browser 2.2 Released with More Configurable Toolbars

    Vivaldi web browser released version 2.2 yesterday with more tabs management functionality, more configurable toolbars, and other new features.

  • Chrome 73 Reportedly Introducing Tab Grouping Feature

    Google is gearing up to make some notable changes to its popular web browser, Chrome, with the latest Chrome 73 update. Last week, Google released the Chrome 71 Update which added dark mode feature, but macOS users missed out on the feature. Recently, it was revealed that Google is reportedly working on Chrome 73, which would bring the dark mode feature for macOS users as well.

    Today, a new feature was leaked in a code change request. “A recent code change suggests that users will be able to organize Chrome tabs into different groups, possibly to improve productivity by grouping tabs belonging to one task or a project in one set.”, as Wccftech reports. Although there is little clarity about the feature’s exact description, this likely seems like the upcoming feature in Windows, ie, ability to group together different applications in one window to improve accessibility as well as productivity.

Web Browsers: Brave, Firefox,and Chromium

Filed under
Web
  • HTC Exodus: Open Source Brave to be Blockchain phone’s default web browser

    HTC’s latest release HTC Exodus 1 is set to introduce the free and open source blockchain-backed Brave as its default browser.

    In a tweet, the CEO & Co-Founder of Brave and Basic Attention Token (BAT) Brendan Eich, shared the development. Brendan said, “We are very happy to have @Brave as default browser & to be working with HTC on their Exodus phone”.

  • Mozilla Firefox 64 Now Available for Download on Windows, Linux, and macOS

    Mozilla has just released Firefox 64 stable for users on Windows, Linux, and macOS, with the Android version likely to be updated in the coming hours.
    While checking for updates using the built-in update engine may not offer you Firefox version 64, you can download the browser using the links below, as Mozilla has just updated its servers with the new builds.

    Firefox 64 introduces a series of changes that were previously tested as part of the beta versions, including recommended extensions. This feature is supposed to help improve the experience with the browser by providing suggestions on services that are relevant to your activity.

  • Microsoft vs the web

    I have been saying for a few years now that Chrome is the new IE, and the Google is the new Microsoft (Microsoft being the new IBM). This statement have been somewhat tongue in cheek, but I have always been serious about it not being a joke: history is repeating. I could got at length on all the reasons why I believe this to be true, but I’ll just talk about one new development.

    Last week, Microsoft announced that they had decided to abandon EdgeHTML, their web browser engine, and move to be using Google’s Chromium as the heart of the web browser offering, Edge. [1] Whether it will be just Blink and V8 (Web rendering and JS engine respectively) or also parts of Chromium is something unclear.

  • What is Chromium and why is Microsoft using it for Edge?

    Chromium is very similar. You can install a standalone application for Windows, macOS and any flavor of Linux named Chromium that's a complete web browser complete with synchronization through Google's could services. But Chromium is also the name of the open-source code project used to make Chromium, as well as the Chrome web browser, Chrome OS, Amazon Silk, and the Android Chrome web-view component companies like Twitter can use to build a browser into an application.

  • How Microsoft Is About to Make Google Chrome Even Better

Tor Browser: An Ultimate Web Browser for Anonymous Web Browsing in Linux

Filed under
Moz/FF
OSS
Security
Web

Most of us give a considerable time of ours to Internet. The primary Application we require to perform our internet activity is a browser, a web browser to be more perfect. Over Internet most of our’s activity is logged to Server/Client machine which includes IP address, Geographical Location, search/activity trends and a whole lots of Information which can potentially be very harmful, if used intentionally the other way.

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Microsoft's Latest Attempt at Stopping People From Using Chrome

Filed under
Google
Microsoft
OSS
Web
  • Microsoft is building Edge on top of Chromium (open source version of Google Chrome

    It is official now. Microsoft is throwing away old code base of Edge browser and making next version of Edge browser on top of Chromium. The open source project behind Google Chrome is known as Chromium. Microsoft is building a Chromium browser to replace Edge on Windows 10 on both x86 and ARM-based systems.

  • Microsoft Edge: Making the web better through more open source collaboration [Ed: This is Microsoft. Whose browser was always proprietary. Whose abuses on the WWW are well documented. Yeah, lecture us now on "open source collaboration" (not freedom).]
  • Microsoft's Edge browser moving to Chromium
  • Microsoft Confirms Edge will use Chromium Rendering Engine, Launches Insider Program
  • Goodbye, EdgeHTML

    Microsoft is officially giving up on an independent shared platform for the internet. By adopting Chromium, Microsoft hands over control of even more of online life to Google.

    This may sound melodramatic, but it’s not. The “browser engines” — Chromium from Google and Gecko Quantum from Mozilla — are “inside baseball” pieces of software that actually determine a great deal of what each of us can do online. They determine core capabilities such as which content we as consumers can see, how secure we are when we watch content, and how much control we have over what websites and services can do to us. Microsoft’s decision gives Google more ability to single-handedly decide what possibilities are available to each one of us.

Chromium-based Iridium and Google Chrome Version 71

Filed under
Google
Web

Raven: An Open Source Desktop RSS Reader

Filed under
Software
Web

Raven is a relatively new open source RSS reader app for Windows, macOS and Linux (hurrah) that I’ve been eager to try out.

This week I finally found some time to dig into this deliciously well designed desktop RSS feed reader, and in this post I’ll provide you with an overview of what it does, what it can’t do, and how I think it could be even better.

But before we go any further you may want to made aware that this open-source, cross-platform RSS reader is built using Electron.

Not fussed? Me, either, but that fact will be a deal-breaker for some.

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Microsoft's Latest EEE Against Chrome is Becoming a Proprietary Clone

Filed under
Microsoft
Web
  • Microsoft is building a Chromium-powered web browser that will replace Edge on Windows 10

    Microsoft's Edge web browser has seen little success since its debut on Windows 10 back in 2015. Built from the ground up with a new rendering engine known as EdgeHTML, Microsoft Edge was designed to be fast, lightweight, and secure, but launched with a plethora of issues which resulted in users rejecting it early on. Edge has since struggled to gain any traction, thanks to its continued instability and lack of mindshare, from users and web developers.

  • Is Microsoft Planning To Replace Edge With A Chromium-based Browser?

    Microsoft Edge, despite its features and improvements in recent years, has failed to perform well in the market — Google Chrome is one of the biggest reasons behind it. According to rumors, Microsoft is planning to tackle the issue by developing a Chromium-based web browser that would replace Edge.

    Windows Central has reported that Microsoft is working on a project codenamed as ‘Anaheim‘ for building a browser based on Chromium, which is an open source web browser project initiated by Google.

  • Edge gets Chrome-plated, and we're all worse off

    I used to think that WebKit would eat the world, but later on I realized it was Blink. In retrospect this should have been obvious when the mobile version of Microsoft Edge was announced to use Chromium (and not Microsoft's own rendering engine EdgeHTML), but now rumour has it that Edge on its own home turf -- Windows 10 -- will be Chromium too. Microsoft engineers have already been spotted committing to the Chromium codebase, apparently for the ARM version. No word on whether this next browser, codenamed Anaheim, will still be called Edge.

  • Microsoft is reportedly ditching Edge on Windows 10 for a Chrome-based browser

    Whether you’re using Google Chrome, Opera, or Brave to browse the web, under the hood, it’s all based on Chromium. Chrome’s Blink engine has become more-or-less the de facto way to render the web. Microsoft has long tried to avoid that fact by constantly working on Internet Explorer then Edge, but it seems no more. Microsoft is reportedly embracing Chrome’s dominance with a new replacement browser for Windows 10.

    Windows Central is reporting that Microsoft is in the early stages of a project, codenamed “Anaheim”, that is currently slated to replace Microsoft Edge for Windows 10. Instead of continuing to use the company’s EdgeHTML engine, Anaheim will reportedly be built upon Chrome’s open source Blink engine.

5 Minimal Web Browsers for Linux

Filed under
Linux
Web

There are so many reasons to enjoy the Linux desktop. One reason I often state up front is the almost unlimited number of choices to be found at almost every conceivable level. From how you interact with the operating system (via a desktop interface), to how daemons run, to what tools you use, you have a multitude of options.

The same thing goes for web browsers. You can use anything from open source favorites, such as Firefox and Chromium, or closed sourced industry darlings like Vivaldi and Chrome. Those options are full-fledged browsers with every possible bell and whistle you’ll ever need. For some, these feature-rich browsers are perfect for everyday needs.

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Linux 4.20--rc76

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1080p Linux Gaming Performance - NVIDIA 415.22 vs. Mesa 19.0-devel RADV/RadeonSI

Stemming from the recent Radeon RX 590 Linux gaming benchmarks were some requests to see more 1080p gaming benchmarks, so here's that article with the low to medium tier graphics cards from the NVIDIA GeForce and AMD Radeon line-up while using the latest graphics drivers on Ubuntu 18.10. This round of benchmarking was done with the GeForce GTX 980, GTX 1060, GTX 1070, and GTX 1070 Ti using the newest 415.22 proprietary graphics driver. On the AMD side was using the patched Linux 4.20 kernel build (for RX 590 support) paired with Mesa 19.0-devel via the Padoka PPA while testing the Radeon RX 580 and RX 590. Read more

Sparky SU 0.1.0

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