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Year of Linux, Steam on PS4, Linux in Space

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Today in Linux news Linus Torvalds declared the end to "Year of Linux desktop" jokes as loosely Linux-based Chromebooks outsell Macs. The big news over the weekend was of clever hackers who installed Arch then Steam on his PlayStation 4. Mageia extended their version 6 artwork contest deadline and the GIMP project put out the call for upcoming version 2.10 documentation update. Dimstar has the latest on Tumbleweed and Lunduke listed 10 more fun things to do in a terminal.

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Bodhi Reviewed, Slackware & Rawhide Latest

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Today in Linux news Bodhi 3.2.1 was released May 13 and today Christine Hall shared her experiences with it. Elsewhere, Jack Wallen gave Open Sourcers permission to use Close software and Bruce Byfield posted 7 tips to help newcomers choose a Linux desktop. Fedora kernel developer Laura Abbott today said that she'll be blogging about Rawhide so folks can "see how the sausage is made" and OpenSource.com began a poll asking, "Why do you use Linux?"

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Pinguy OS on the Ropes, What Linux Is

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The top Linux story today was the blog post by Pinguy OS founder saying he was thinking of "killing off Pinguy OS" due to financial difficulties. Elsewhere, TeckRadar posted an article from Linux Format answering, "What is Linux?" Another review of the Aquaris M10 Ubuntu tablet found Canonical "still has a lot work to do" and The Register reported on an analysis of women in Open Source Software.

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Tumbleweed Live Loses Installer, YaST Trusted Boot

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Today in Linux news Douglas DeMaio wrote the next Tumbleweed snapshot is to bring some exciting changes - and some not so exciting. They're dropping the installer from the live images. The YaST team announced some new changes in the bootloader module and installer as well as other developments from Sprint 19.

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Devuan Rough, KWayland Advances, UT on Linux

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A review of Devuan Linux 1.0 Beta was the most interesting bit of news today. Jack Germain said the Debian fork needed more polish to succeed. Martin Gräßlin blogged today that KWayland is now in KDE Frameworks and Liam Dawe reported Unreal Tournament on Linux is shaping up fairly well. Derrik Diener reviewed Solus OS and the changes keep coming in Slackware 14.2 development.

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End of Apple, maddog Recovering, PCLOS Drops 32-bit

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Top new today in the Linux world is the recovery of Jon "maddog" Hall. Hall, a staunch supporter of Linux and Open Source, recently suffered a heart attack and is now recovering comfortably at home. PCLinuxOS announced the end of the 32-bit versions and Dimstar blogged the latest in Tumbleweed. Elsewhere, Paul Venezia said Apple is on the ropes and Neil Rickert said Microsoft clearly doesn't even care about security.

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Bodhi 3.2.1 Released, Open Source Evolution

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Jeff Hoogland today announced Bodhi Linux 3.2.1 with bug fixes for issues discovered since 3.2.0. Debian thanked Mythic Beast for a hardware load and Chris Hoffman wrote the Ubuntu BQ Aquaris M10 isn't "quite finished." Elsewhere, Sourceforge.net posted "The Evolution of Open Source" and Sam Varghese said today that the "day of reckoning" has arrived for BitKeeper's Larry McVoy.

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OpenMandriva Lx3 Forked, ZFS on Debian, H264 in Fedora

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The next OpenMandriva is one step closer to becoming a release this week as the cooker developmental branch was forked off to stabilize Lx3. Petter Reinholdtsen today announced that ZFS has been accepted into Debian "after many years of hard work" and Christian Schaller blogged H264 support is now available to Fedora users. In other news, LibreOffice 5.1.3 was released and Jack Germain reviewed Simplicity Linux.

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Mageia 6 Delays, Linux Longevity, Fedora CANTFIX

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Today in Linux news Mageia 6 is falling a bit behind schedule having missed a stabilization release and now delaying versions freeze. openSUSE Tumbleweed received an update to Plasma 5.6.3 and Red Hat announced their latest coup. Elsewhere, Bruce Byfield wondered how long desktop Linux can last considering the world's obsession with portables and Eric Nicholls wondered if Ubuntu can retain their "title of best desktop OS."

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Fedora 24 Beta and RHEL 6.8 Released

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Topping the Linux news today was the release of Fedora 24 Beta built with GCC 6 and glibc 2.23 and features GNOME 3.20. Parent company Red Hat announced an update to version 6 bringing "new capabilities and a stable and trusted platform." On the other side of town, Scott Gilbertson posted a detailed review of Ubuntu 16.04 and Ubuntu's Michael Hall shared his experiences using Unity 8 exclusively.

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Also: Fedora 24 Beta is out and ready to take you to Linux's future

Fedora 24 Beta Looks Nice, But Will They Ever Stop Mucking Up Anaconda?

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More in Tux Machines

Servo Night Builds Begin, Linux Packages Coming

The Mozilla developers working on the Servo browser layout engine and the Browser.html HTML-based web UI have kept to their goal of making a tech preview available in June. As of last night, the Servo developers hit their tech preview milestone we've been looking forward to seeing for months. Nightly builds of Servo and Browser.html have begun and they are going to be making available Linux packages shortly. Read more

Android Leftovers

Leftovers: OSS

  • Modern open source systems management
    Open source IT systems management is undergoing a renaissance. Adopters include global, household-name enterprises, as well as a groundswell of IT operations teams that are borrowing flexible, collaborative practices from the Agile software development movement. Some open source IT systems management tools are familiar to most admins, with broad adoption -- think Nagios or the Elasticsearch, Logstash and Kibana stack. Others -- Docker is a prime example -- burst onto the scene recently and are shaking up IT deployments.
  • Code Alliance connects nonprofits with tech volunteers
    Code Alliance is a Benetech initiative that connects technology professionals to volunteer opportunities with open source software projects for social good. On the first day of the CHI4GOOD conference, we brought over 40 projects to the San Jose Convention Center to participate in a hack4good Day of Service event. More than 100 developers, UX designers, and researchers came together to help our nonprofit cohort with their technological needs. The nonprofits benefitted from expert technical development work, and the volunteers were gracious, skilled, and excited to leverage their professional skills to give back.
  • Nonprofit's Open Source Designs Reduce Cost Barriers for Startups
    A project that originated in "The Middle of Nowhere, Missouri," as the founders call it, aims to lower the barrier to entry across a number of industries, all while maintaining a sustainable footprint. It's called Open Source Ecology (OSE), the brainchild of Marcin Jakubowski, founder of the Factor E Farm in Missouri where OSE is based.
  • The Open Building Institute - A Sustainable Way to Build Modular Housing
  • Open Building Institute is revolutionizing sustainable home building through open-source technologies
  • Pulp Smash Introduction
    Pulp Smash is a functional test suite for Pulp. It’s used by the Pulp developers and Pulp QE team on a daily basis. It’s implemented as a GPL licensed pure Python library, and getting started is as simple as installing Python and executing the following...
  • How Oracle’s business as usual is threatening to kill Java
    Stop me if you've heard this one before: Oracle has quietly pulled funding and development efforts away from a community-driven technology where customers and partners have invested time and code. It all seems to be happening for no reason other than the tech isn't currently printing money. It's a familiar pattern for open source projects that have become the property of Oracle. It started with OpenSolaris and continued with OpenOffice.org. And this time, it's happening to Java—more specifically to Java Enterprise Edition (Java EE), the server-side Java technology that is part of hundreds of thousands of Internet and business applications. Java EE even plays an integral role for many apps that aren't otherwise based on Java. For months as Oracle Corporation's attorneys have battled Google in the courts over the use of Java interfaces in Android's Davlik programming language, Oracle's Java development efforts have slowed. And in the case of Java EE, they've come to a complete halt. The outright freeze has caused concerns among companies that contribute to the Java platform and among other members of the Java community—a population that includes some of Oracle's biggest customers.
  • Friday's security updates

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