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Pigs Flying, Popular Licenses, and LibreOffice 4.3.4

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Jon maddog Hall today said that it'd be "when pigs fly" when Microsoft really embraces Open Source. In other news, Rob Zwetsloot is back with Part 2 of his top 10 Linux desktops and Jim Lynch reviewed Trisquel 7.0. LibreOffice 4.3.4 was released and Stephen O'Grady looks at the most popular Open Source licenses. Phoronix is reporting that Ubuntu will probably adopt systemd next release and Carla Schroder has some tips for KDE 4 productivity.

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Secure Distros and Top Desktops

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Today in Linux news lifehacker.com posted a comparison of security distributions Tails, Kali, and Qubes. Elsewhere, Government Computer News has some tips for migrating to Open Source. Rob Zwetsloot looks at popular desktops and Michael Larabel reports that Ubuntu is phasing out 32-bit support.

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Debian 8 Progress, Nine Best Distros, and Mageia 5 Beta 1

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Many headlines today featured news that Microsoft will open source .NET and Swapnil Bhartiya discusses what this means for Linux. Bruce Byfield helps folks decide which of the nine best Linux distributions is for them and Debian 8 seems to be rolling right along. And finally today is a couple of reviews.

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GNOME wins GNOME, Year of Linux, and State of Gaming

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The GNOME Foundation no sooner put out their cry for support when the offending party bowed out. Katherine Noyes explores 2015 as the year of Linux on the desktop. Jamie Watson tests a few distributions on his Acer Aspire E11 and LinuxBSDos.com reviews Pisi Linux 1.1.

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More Debian and Systemd, *Ubuntu Reviews, and Fedora Confusion

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Debian and systemd top Linux news today with the latter being blamed for the loss of high profile Debian developer. Paul Venezia says Red Hat has confused Linux users with its latest Fedora moves and bloggers contemplate Debian and other forks. Adrian Bridgwater says had Linux been proprietary it would have cost $1 trillion and Michael Meeks talks OpenGL rendering in LibreOffice.

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Is KDE 5 Ready, Repo Dark Sides, and Black Lab Linux

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Today in Linux news Chris Hoffman looks at the "hidden dark side of Linux software repositories" using Ubuntu and ownCloud as examples. Jack M. Germain test drives Black Lab Linux, an Ubuntu compatible distribution aiming for ease of use. Jos Poortvliet answers "Where is KDE 5 and when can I use it?" Phoronix is reporting on the Fedora project's ambition to include AppData in its software and Charlene Begley has been appointed to Red Hat's Board of Directors.

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Jessie Freeze, Reviews, and Linux Outlaws Quitting

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Today in Linux news, Debian 8 is frozen and Canonical confirms an Ubuntu tablet is in the works. Two reviews landed yesterday on the Kano Linux computer, one today on Ubuntu, and another on openSUSE 13.2. Linux Australia is now censoring its mailing list and Jack Wallen says Ubuntu 14.10 was a boring release because they are in a holding pattern.

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openSUSE 13.2 and Fedora 21 Beta Released

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The top stories today were the releases of openSUSE 13.2 and Fedora 21 Beta. WRAL looks at Red Hat at 20 and Matt Hartley guides folks to Ubuntu laptops. The openSUSE Tumbleweed/Factory merger is complete and a migration guide has been posted. Other tidbits include OpenBSD replacing OpenSSL with LibreSSL and The Register joking about a character on The Code named Sgt L. Torvalds.

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Too Many Forks, the Right Distro, and Reason for Fedora

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Today in Linux news the community tackles the "too many forks" question. Jack Wallen has how to find the right distro for the job and Mayank Sharma updated his "10 best Linux distros" article. Danny Stieben has five reasons to look forward to Fedora 21 and Bryan Lunduke looks at ChromeOS in his latest desktop-a-week review.

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Systemd is Back, Microsoft Hearts Linux, and Qubes OS

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News seemed a bit slow on this All Hallows Eve, but there was still plenty to highlight. Folks are questioning Microsoft's recent claims to "love Linux." Systemd is back in the headlines with a primer from Chris Hoffman, a Fedora Rawhide systemd warning is in effect, and someone Ask Slashdot if readers could say anything nice about systemd. Jack M. Germain reviews Qubes OS and Larry Cafiero brings "The Wide World of Canonical."

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More in Tux Machines

The Machine with Open Source Carbon OS is the Next Big Thing – if HP can deliver

HP has recently been facing some serious difficulties and has opted to betting all its resources on the new PC called ‘The Machine’. Probably the most intriguing thing about the machine is that it will rewrite basic computing on a very fundamental level. While the topic has been covered extensively, I realized we haven’t actually touched it here and thought it was about time. Read more

YEAR of the PENGUIN: A Linux mobile in 2015?

It's nearly impossible to sum up an entire year of developments in something as large and nebulous as the world of desktop Linux, especially in a year like this one which has seen some the best releases that projects like Mint, Fedora and openSUSE have put out to date. At the same time the distro that's closest to being a household name, Ubuntu, has been nearly silent since 14.04 arrived in April. To paraphrase author Charles Dickens, the past year of Linux releases has been both the best of times and the worst of times. At the very moment that Linux desktops seem to be reaching new levels of sophistication, polish and "just works" ease-of-use, the entire future of the desktop computer (by which I also mean laptop) feels in doubt. Read more

Jolla's Sailfish OS Update 10 Is Now Available

The tenth update to Jolla's Sailfish mobile operating system is now available. This update is version 1.1.1.26 and is codenamed Vaarainjärvi. Read more

Forget Google's robot cars, now it's on to ANDROID cars

Google is planning a big push into in-car infotainment systems with an upcoming version of Android, sources claim. "Android M" – the version to come after the current Android 5.0 "Lollipop" – will be available in a formulation designed specifically to run cars' built-in screens, Reuters reports, citing anonymous insiders with knowledge of the plan. Google made its first advances toward the automotive world at its I/O developer conference earlier this year, when it unveiled its Android Auto software. The first Android Auto–compatible cars are expected to arrive early next year. Read more