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Bodhi AppPack, Unstable KDE Rebuttal, Arch Stability

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A busy day in Linux today begins with Jeff Hoogland who released a software bundle for Bodhi Linux with all your favorite applications. Pavlo Rudyi compiled a retrospective of KDE's nineteen years as Martin Gräßlin addressed last week's stability complaints. MakeTechEasier has five ways to make Arch Linux more stable and Canonical is in the hot seat for allowing malware to infiltrate its repositories. Elsewhere, as openSUSE Leap is being prepared for release wiki contributers can get a Leap cap and Neil Rickert has a recent new report.

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Susan's Picks

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  • Unstable KDE, Internet without Linux

    As KDE turns 19, two reports today said that KDE isn't stable enough, one is a fairly comprehensive analysis. Elsewhere, openSUSE Leap 42.1 RC1 was released today and SUSE announced their SUSECon 2015 keynotes. Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols discussed whether there'd actually be an Internet "Without Linux" and OMG!Ubuntu! got a look at Episode 2 before it was mysteriously pulled. Finally, Jack M. Germain said Robolinux 8.1 has the best MATE ever.

  • Red Hat Buys Ansible, openSUSE Leap Review

    The big news today was Red Hat's acquisition of cloud automation specialist Ansible. Ansible is located just up the road from Red Hat and was started by former Red Hat employees. In other news, Jamie Watson reported on openSUSE Leap 42.1 progress.

SFLC Confronts FCC, OSI Supports GPL Enforcement Principles

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Today in Linux and Open Source news the Software Freedom Law Center filed a comment with the FCC arguing against overly-broad regulations that eliminate Open Source alternative on wireless devices. Elsewhere, My Linux Rig interviewed FOSSforce's Larry Cafiero and Rafael Laguna released Halloween wallpapers for Lubuntu.

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Sneaky Microsoft, Citizen and Government Clouds

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Monday, October 13 was a busy day in Linux news. One of the more interesting tidbits comes from Neil Rickert who said, "Microsoft is being sneaky" in trying to covertly upgrade his Windows installs to version 10. Another from Red Hat's Eike Rathke remembered OpenOffice.org fifteenth birthday. Elsewhere, Red Hat's Nathan Jones addressed the state of government cloud and Marco Fioretti shared some thoughts on the "Citizen Cloud."

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  • Microsoft is being sneaky

    I purchased my main desktop for use with linux. But it came with Windows 8 as a discount deal from Dell. So I kept the Windows 8, and added a second hard drive for linux. I did update to Windows 8.1. I kept Windows for experimenting with dual boot on a UEFI system.

    My normal usage on this computer is to boot opensuse. But twice a week I boot to windows and update the anti-virus (Windows Defender). Once a month, I also do Windows updates. Then I boot straight back to linux.

Linux Discussion Continues, Fedora Welcomes Chromium

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Folks are still discussing the resignation of Sarah Sharp and Matthew Garrett from Linux kernel development. Jack Wallen said Sharp (and Garrett) are cases of more developers being "turned away, simply because developers had no patience for personal respect." He said Linux rules with a "sharp and iron tongue" with "foul and abusive language." He agreed with Dr. Roy Schestowitz in that all this is a "PR nightmare" threatening the "flagship of the open-source movement." He placed part of the blame on what he calls the "Internet of hate" and said if Linux is to compete with Microsoft and Apple its developers need to "start treating the legions of programmers, who are working tirelessly to deliver, as well as they treat the code itself. Open source is about community. A community with a toxic foundation will eventually crumble."

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Microsoft Ubuntu Rumors and Kernel Resignation Opinions

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The Linux Journal today addressed the Microsoft-buying-Canonical rumors saying it's against Ubuntu's founding principles. Reactions to the two kernel resignations this week are mixed and we'll take a look. Elsewhere, KDE signs the User Data Manifesto 2.0 and American Trade Journal looks at the business end of Red Hat lately.

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Kubuntu Council Welcomes New Members, Mageia 4 EOL

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Kubuntu Council member Philip Muškovac today announced three new council members replacing three recent losses including Jonathan Riddell. Mageia 4 is reaching end-of-life and Jamie Watson is back reporting if other Linux variants can handle his new Acer Aspire netbook. Elsewhere, John Grogan spoke with SUSE VP Michael Miller at LinuxCon about the future of SUSE and Linux.

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Also: New Kubuntu Council members

Riddell Answers Canonical with Own IP Policy

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In the latest salvo in the Canonical IP controversy, Jonathan Riddell today posted his own IP Policy. Elsewhere, the GNOME Foundation today posted support of an updated User Data Manifesto and SUSE today revealed some SUSECon 2015 plans. Phoronix reported Monday that ext3 will be removed from the kernel and Red Hat announced the release of 7.2 Beta.

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Google, Microsoft Create Alliance for Open Media

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The founding members are Amazon, Cisco, Google, Intel Corporation, Microsoft, Mozilla and Netflix. The goal is to "create a new, open royalty-free video codec specification based on the contributions of members, along with binding specifications for media format, content encryption and adaptive streaming." The word open is used many times in the announcement, but only once with source. Is "open" the same thing as "open source?" Roy Schestowitz at Tuxmachines.org doesn't think so. He organized the news of the AOM under the title "OpenWashing (Fake FOSS)."

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Also: Comments on the Alliance for Open Media, or, "Oh Man, What a Day"

Mozilla's mobile misstep puts the Web at risk

Firefox Fading, Ditching OpenOffice, and Containers

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Dissatisfaction with Mozilla's recent announcement to change its extension core code is being expressed across the Internet. Folks aren't happy. Elsewhere, Chris Hoffman explains why you should switch from OpenOffice to LibreOffice and the Canonical IP fight continues. In other news, several container headlines caught my eye recently.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Why leading DevOps may get you a promotion
    Gene Kim, author of The Phoenix Project and leading DevOps proponent, seems to think so. In a recent interview with TechBeacon's Mike Perrow, Kim notes that of "the nearly 100 speakers at DevOps Enterprise Summits over the last two years, about one in three have been promoted."
  • Cloud Vendors, The Great Disruptors, Face Disruption From Blockchain
  • SWORDY, a local party brawler could come to Linux if Microsoft allow it
    SWORDY is a rather fun looking local party brawler that has just released on Steam in Early Access. It could see a Linux release too, if Microsoft allow it.
  • System Shock remake has blasted past the Linux stretch goal, officially coming to Linux
    The Linux stretch goal was $1.1 million and it's pleasing to see it hit the goal, so we won't miss out now. I am hoping they don't let anyone down, as they have shown they can do it already by providing the demo. There should be no reason to see a delay with Linux now.
  • GammaRay 2.5 release
    GammaRay 2.5 has been released, the biggest feature release yet of our Qt introspection tool. Besides support for Qt 5.7 and in particular the newly added Qt 3D module a slew of new features awaits you, such as access to QML context property chains and type information, object instance statistics, support for inspecting networking and SSL classes, and runtime switchable logging categories.
  • GammaRay 2.5 Released For Qt Introspection
    KDAB has announced the release of GammaRay 2.5, what they say is their "biggest feature release yet", the popular introspection tool for Qt developers.
  • The new Keyboard panel
    After implementing the new redesigned Shell of GNOME Control Center, it’s now time to move the panels to a bright new future. And the Keyboard panel just walked this step.
  • Debian on Seagate Personal Cloud and Seagate NAS
    The majority of NAS devices supported in Debian are based on Debian's Kirkwood platform. This platform is quite dated now and can only run Debian's armel port. Debian now supports the Seagate Personal Cloud and Seagate NAS devices. They are based on Marvell's Armada 370, a platform which can run Debian's armhf port. Unfortunately, even the Armada 370 is a bit dated now, so I would not recommend these devices for new purchases. If you have one already, however, you now have the option to run native Debian.

OSS Leftovers

Red Hat News

Leftovers: Software