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No Ubuntu Back Doors, Windows and Mac Migrations

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Today in Linux news Microsoft's market share has dipped below 90% and Mac is disappearing from Linux conventions. Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth said in an interview today that security and encryption are a commitment of Ubuntu's. Jesse Smith reviewed the latest version of Ubuntu and OMG!Ubuntu! shared some glimpses of Ubuntu in the wild. Bryan Lunduke listed 12 "Linux geeks" all users should follow on social media and Sandra Gittlen highlighted six colleges that "immerse students in Open Source."

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Devuan Beta, Stumbling Tumbleweed, Ubuntu Too

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Today in Linux news Debian-fork Devuan is forging ahead with its plans to create a distribution offering init freedom by releasing a beta for testers. Douglas DeMaio posted today that openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots have halted due to glibc upgrade rebuilds. Dedoimedo reviewed the BQ Aquaris M10 and liliputing.com posted of another Ubuntu laptop for sale. And finally, the Hectic Geek reviewed Ubuntu 16.04 and Neil Rickert reviewed Kubuntu 16.04.

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Also: Devuan releases beta

Devuan Jessie - beta release announcement

Fedora 24 Delayed, Linus the Tops, New openSUSE Team

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Fedora Program Manager Jan Kuřík today announced a delay in Fedora 24, both the upcoming Beta and Final. Elsewhere openSUSE announced a new community release team, a group of volunteers to help with the release tasks. Linus Torvalds and Richard Stallman both appeared on a "top 10 programmers of all time" list and a Windows 10 upgrade screen has gone viral.

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Firefox 46, Vivaldi 1.1, Homeless Thunderbird

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Mozilla was in the news today first for releasing Firefox 46 with GTK+ 3 integration. They're also making headlines for trying to find a new home for Thunderbird, their browser-based email client. In competing news, the Vivaldi project announced version 1.1 of their new browser already, not even a month since its initial release. Elsewhere, Bruce Byfield discusses the Debian installer and Jack Germain said "Bodhi Linux is elegant and lightweight."

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Also: Update to Firefox Released Today

Should MS Buy Canonical, No Year of Linux Desktop

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With Microsoft and Canonical's new chummy relationship still on the minds of many, Janakiram MSV today said "Microsoft's Open Source strategy is incompletely" without them. He said with Microsoft trying to change their image away from being Windows-only, it only makes sense to buy Canonical. Ubuntu has millions of users and "an army of developers and system administrators." Besides people, Canonical comes with LXD, Snappy Ubuntu Core, and Juju - all things that could make Microsoft more competitive in the cloud and IoT. To Janakiram, there are no downsides for Microsoft.

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Snap Not Contained, Shuttleworth Says Don't Talk Back

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Ubuntu continued to dominate the headlines today with some reporting the new version being actually available and all the usual accompanying posts. One of the more interesting Ubuntu articles of the day came from Matthew Garrett who said that Snap applications could expose your private data. In other Ubuntu news, Mark Shuttleworth announced the new codename for the next release already. Elsewhere, Gentoo was hacked onto a car computer and Microsoft is hiring Linux developers.

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Also: Developer Claims That Canonical's Snap Format Isn't Secure in Ubuntu with X11 - Updated

Ubuntu 16.04 Imminent, New Slack Live Beta, Fedora 24/25 Schedules

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Canonical today announced the release of Ubuntu 16.04, although it isn't actually on mirrors yet. Eric Hameleers announced the next test release of Slackware Live whose final will be based on upcoming Slackware 14.2 and Fedora 24 may end up slipping another week causing ripple effects through version 26. Bruce Byfield today discussed the second goal of Linux and Jonathan Riddell announced a user edition of KDE neon.

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rm -rf Hoax, Well-oiled LXLE, New Debian Project Leader

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It turns out that Marco Marsala's deletion of his entire web hosting data, reported Friday, was a viral marketing campaign. Debian Project Leader elections are over and a winner emerged victorious. Several reviews caught my eye today as did Jessie Smith's look at Redox, a Unix-like operating system whose underlying philosophy is "Everything is a URL."

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rm -rf Whoops, Slackware 14.2 RC2, Shuttleworth Interview

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Mark Shuttleworth said in an interview published today that Linux would be difficult to use everyday if not for Ubuntu. Elsewhere, Patrick Volkerding announced Slackware 14.2 RC2 and one sysadmin had a real bad day after accidentally running rm -rf. Reiserfs creator and convicted murderer Hans Reiser is featured in a new motion picture that's getting mixed reviews and Neil Rickert shared his thoughts on btrfs.

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Kubuntu's Cautionary Tale, Requiem for Open Standards

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Andy Updegrove wrote yesterday, "The top IT companies are increasingly opting to use open source software to solve problems that they used to address with open standards." Elsewhere, Larry the BSD Guy said UbuntuBSD should consider what happened to Kubuntu when considering becoming an official Ubuntu flavor and Jesse Afolabi was "blown away" by Deepin OS 15. Jonathan Riddell announced a new rebasing of KDE Neon and Bruce Byfield looks at the Free Software Foundation's High Priority Projects.

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More in Tux Machines

PlayOnLinux For Easier Use Of Wine

PlayOnLinux is a free program that helps to install, run, and manage Windows software on Linux. It can also manage virtual C: drives (known as Wine prefixes), and download and install certain Windows libraries for getting some software to run on Wine properly. Creating different drives using different Wine versions is also possible. It is very handy because what runs well in one version may not run as well (if at all) on a newer version. There is PlayOnMac for macOS and PlayOnBSD for FreeBSD. Read
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Linux Kernel: KPTI, SEV, CBS

  • Experimental KPTI Support For x86 32-bit Linux
    For the Kernel Page Table Isolation (KPTI) support currently within the Linux kernel for addressing the Meltdown CPU vulnerability it's currently limited to 64-bit on the x86 side, but for the unfortunate souls still running x86 32-bit operating systems, SUSE is working on such support.
  • AMD Secure Encrypted Virtualization Is Ready To Roll With Linux 4.16
    With the Linux 4.16 kernel cycle that is expected to begin immediately following the Linux 4.15 kernel debut on Sunday, AMD's Secure Encrypted Virtualization (SEV) technology supported by their new EPYC processors will be mainline. Going back to the end of 2016 have been Linux patches for Secure Encrypted Virtualization while with Linux 4.16 it will finally be part of the mainline kernel and supported with KVM (Kernel-based Virtual Machine) virtualization.
  • Deadline scheduler part 2 — details and usage
    Linux’s deadline scheduler is a global early deadline first scheduler for sporadic tasks with constrained deadlines. These terms were defined in the first part of this series. In this installment, the details of the Linux deadline scheduler and how it can be used will be examined. The deadline scheduler prioritizes the tasks according to the task’s job deadline: the earliest absolute deadline first. For a system with M processors, the M earliest deadline jobs will be selected to run on the M processors. The Linux deadline scheduler also implements the constant bandwidth server (CBS) algorithm, which is a resource-reservation protocol. CBS is used to guarantee that each task will receive its full run time during every period. At every activation of a task, the CBS replenishes the task’s run time. As the job runs, it consumes that time; if the task runs out, it will be throttled and descheduled. In this case, the task will be able to run only after the next replenishment at the beginning of the next period. Therefore, CBS is used to both guarantee each task’s CPU time based on its timing requirements and to prevent a misbehaving task from running for more than its run time and causing problems to other jobs.

Graphics: Mesa and AMDGPU

  • Mesa 17.3.3 Released With RADV & ANV Vulkan Driver Fixes
    Mesa 17.3.3 is now available as the latest point release for the Mesa 17.3 stable series. This bi-weekly point release to Mesa presents several RADV Vega/GFX9 fixes, various Intel ANV Vulkan driver fixes, a DRI3 fix, and random fixes to the OpenGL drivers like RadeonSI, Etnaviv, and even Swrast.
  • R600g "Soft" FP64 Shows Signs Of Life, Enabling Older GPUs To Have OpenGL 4 In 2018
    Most pre-GCN AMD graphics cards are still limited to OpenGL 3.3 support at this time due to not supporting FP64. Only the HD 5800/6900 series on R600g currently have real double-precision floating-point support working right now so at present they are on OpenGL 4.3 rather than 3.3, but those other generations may be catching up soon thanks to the "soft" FP64 code.
  • AMDGPU DC Gets More Raven Ridge Improvements, Audio Fixes
    Harry Wentland of AMD has sent out the latest batch of patches for the AMDGPU DC display code stack. Fortunately it lightens up the DRM driver by about six thousand lines thanks to removing some unused code. Besides gutting out a chunk of unused code, the DC code has a few audio fixes (no word yet on supporting newer audio formats with DC), fixes on driver unload, a "bunch" of continued Raven Ridge display updates, and various other code clean-ups.
  • AMDGPU Firmware Blobs Updated For Video Encode/Decode
    There are updated AMDGPU microcode/firmware files now available for recent Radeon GPUs. The updated firmware files now available via the main linux-firmware.git repository are centered around the video blocks: UVD video decoding, VCE video encode, and the new VCN video encode/decode block with Raven Ridge.

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