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Solus Still Not Ready, NVIDIA on Wayland, Pimpin' Xfce

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When Apache began the public discussion of what to do with OpenOffice, I knew someone would bring up the LibreOffice remerger. Today Jack Wallen did just that. Elsewhere, Neil Rickert said that Solus still needs more work to be a daily driver and more on NVIDIA with Wayland was discussed in the Land of Wobbly Windows. Sebastian Kuegler blogged Plasma 5.8 excludes Wayland from long term support and Bruce Byfield highlighted seven KDE applications sometimes forgotten and Dedoimedo pimped Xfce.

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Ubuntu Infringing, AlienBob Quits, Linus' Laptop

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The top story today proves once again that Hollywood has way too much power. A DMCA takedown request to Google, to which they relented, included an address to Ubuntu 12.04.2 LTS. In other news, Slackware developer and Slackware Live founder Eric "AlienBob" Hameleers has given his notice and Bodhi Linux 4.0.0 Alpha 2 was released. Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols spoke to Linus Torvalds about his development computer and Matt Hartley posted some ideas for the perfect Linux desktop.

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Our Last Stand, SUSE Merged with HPE, Whazzup Zorin

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Seems like the top story today was the merger of Hewlett Packard Enterprise and SUSE parent company Micro Focus. Links to the press release arrived yesterday emphasizing that SUSE is now HPE's preferred Linux partner. In other news, the Everyday Linux User pondered the "strange" developments over at the Zorin OS camp and OMG!Ubuntu! discussed Ubuntu's new default wallpaper. Michael Larabel took TrueOS Beta for a spin and Doc Searls said today, "Linux has been used at least as much to build corporate (and government) cathedrals as to liberate the geeks who write it."

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Also: SUSE Primed for Continued Growth via Micro Focus Merger with Hewlett Packard Enterprise's Software Business Segment and Alliance with Hewlett Packard Enterprise

KDE is 20, Flash Lives, Deep Web Distros

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It was twenty years ago in 1996 that KDE was first announced. The project is celebrating with a new book. Elsewhere, Abode announced they've updated the old Netscape Flash plugin and said that development would continue. JP Buntinx recommended some distributions for the "darknet" and a new Linux usermode rootkit was described by anti-virus company Trend Micro.

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OpenOffice Retirement, CPUs Will Linux, Kernel.org Hacker Arrested

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A suspect has been arrested for hacking into kernel.org five years ago topping the Linux headlines on a busy news day. It caused a lot of headaches back then and a months downtime. In other news, reports of the latest AMD and Intel chips only supporting Windows 10 weren't exactly accurate and Apache is seriously considering throwing in the towel on OpenOffice. Neil Rickert posted a look at the latest Leap Beta and more details emerge on PC-BSD's move to TrueOS.

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Susan's Links

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Bodhi Updates, KaOS & Antergos Reviews, Another 25?

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Today in Linux news, Jeff Hoogland posted a short update on the progress of Bodhi Linux 4.0 and reported on the updates to the project's donations page. In other news, An Everyday Linux User reviewed Arch-based Antergos Linux saying it was "decent" and Ubuntu-fan Jack Wallen reviewed "beautiful" KDE-centric KaOS. makeuseof.com has five reasons to switch to the Ubuntu phone and Brian Fagioli asked if Linux can survive another 25 years.

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PC-BSD > TrueOS, BSD's Legacy, f25 Wayland Maybe

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A few days ago we reported that Wayland is set to be the default graphical server in upcoming Fedora 25 but today Michael Catanzaro said only if it's ready. PC-BSD is renaming their desktop operating system to TrueOS and Christopher Tozzi looked at why BSD didn't become the dominate Unix-clone. Elsewhere, Michael Mason examined Budgie Desktop distros and, of course, there's more on Linux' 25th.

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NOAA Breaks Weather Apps, Slackware Updates, Valve @ 20

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The LinuxCon headlines continue to dominate but, more importantly, our desktop weather apps are broken thanks to NOAA decommissioning the site. Liam Dawe looked back at 20 years of Valve and Sebastian "sebas" Kügler introduced new KDE kscreen-doctor. Slackware rolled out some updates including a rare kernel upgrade and The VAR Guy wants to hear about your first time.

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LinuxCon & 25 Years, New Slack Live, Gentoo's Demise

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All the talk of the last couple of days has been about Linux and LinuxCon. As Linux celebrates 25 years, big names gather to remember the past and plan for the future. Even Microsoft is getting in on the act. Elsewhere, Eric Hameleers released a new Slackware Live based on the latest Slackware-current and Jack Germain said Slackware 14.2 "doesn't cut newbies any Slack." Jim Lynch picked up on a conversation discussing the slow but steady demise of Gentoo as the community said farewell to a passing friend. Distrowatch.com carried a review of Gentoo 20160514 Live and Mint 18 KDE Beta was released.

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More in Tux Machines

Fedora: Qubes, rpminspect, rpminspect, and ProcDump

  • PoC to auto attach USB devices in Qubes

    Here is PoC based on qubesadmin API which can auto attach USB devices to any VM as required. By default Qubes auto attaches any device to the sys-usb VM, that helps with bad/malware full USB devices. But, in special cases, we may want to select special devices to be auto attached to certain VMs. In this PoC example, we are attaching any USB storage device, but, we can add some checks to mark only selected devices (by adding more checks), or we can mark few vms where no device can be attached.

  • David Cantrell: rpminspect-0.9 released

    Very large packages (VLPs) are something I am working on with rpminspect. For example, the kernel package. A full build of the kernel source package generates a lot of files. I am working on improving rpminspect's speed and fixing issues found with individual inspections. These are only showing up when I do test runs comparing VLPs. The downside here is that it takes a little longer than with any other typical package.

  • Fedora pastebin and fpaste updates

    A pastebin lets you save text on a website for a length of time. This helps you exchange data easily with other users. For example, you can post error messages for help with a bug or other issue. The CentOS Pastebin is a community-maintained service that keeps pastes around for up to 24 hours. It also offers syntax highlighting for a large number of programming and markup languages.

  • ProcDump for Linux in Fedora

    ProcDump is a nifty debugging utility which is able to dump the core of a running application once a user-specified CPU or memory usage threshold is triggered. For instance, the invocation procdump -C 90 -p $MYPID instructs ProcDump to monitor the process with ID $MYPID, waiting for a 90 % CPU usage spike. Once it hits, it creates the coredump and exits. This allows you to later inspect the backtrace and memory state in the moment of the spike without having to attach a debugger to the process, helping you determine which parts of your code might be causing performance issues.

Programming: Interview With Guido van Rossum, Python Picks and New Release of Picolibc From Keith Packard

  • Interview Guido van Rossum: “I'd rather write code than papers.”

    Guido van Rossum (1956) is the founding father of the Python programming language, one of the most popular development tools in the world. In 2019 CWI will award him the Dijkstra Fellowship. What led you to come up with a brand new programming language during your time at CWI? “I started at CWI as a junior programmer on a research team with Lambert Meertens, Leo Geurts and Steven Pemberton. They wanted to develop a language which would enable people without programming experience – such as scientists – to start writing computer programs fairly quickly.” “It was at the time that Basic was on the rise due to the arrival of the microcomputer. Meertens looked at this inadequate language with horror. ‘Stamp out Basic!’ Was his motto. In the end, ABC, as our language was called, would not work. The target group could not use it on their microcomputers, which were not powerful enough for it, while Unix users already had other tools. Those users thought ABC was an odd man out.” “Then I came across the so-called Amoeba project. That was a distributed operating system based on a microkernel, developed by Andrew Tanenbaum at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and Sape Mullender at CWI. Not aiming at popularizing their operating system, their first and foremost goal was writing papers. Scientifically it was a breakthrough indeed: those papers are still being studied. I myself was not a researcher but a programmer on that project. I must say thought that there was an atmosphere at CWI in which programmers had a major input in the projects.”

  • Python Tears Through Mass Spectrometry Data

    At the November 2019 Python Frederick event, Conor Jenkins showed the group how mass spectrometry works and how Python saves huge amounts of time when processing the large amount of data produced by a mass spec analysis.

  • Wingware News: Wing Python IDE 7.1.3 - November 14, 2019

    Wing 7.1.3 adds improved and expanded documentation and support for matplotlib, improves the accuracy of code warnings, fixes automatically debugging child processes on Windows with Python 3.8, fixes installing the remote agent from .rpm or .deb installations, solves several issues with runtime type introinspection, allows Open from Project and similar navigation commands from non-Browse vi mode, improves debugger reliability, and fixes about 30 other minor usability issues.

  • Easily specifying colours from the default colour cycle in matplotlib

    Another quick matplotlib tip today: specifically, how easily specify colours from the standard matplotlib colour cycle. A while back, when matplotlib overhauled their themes and colour schemes, they changed the default cycle of colours used for lines in matplotlib. Previously the first line was pure blue (color='b' in matplotlib syntax), then red, then green etc. They, very sensibly, changed this to a far nicer selection of colours.

  • Typing Mercurial with pytype

    Following the recent introduction of Python type annotations (aka "type hints") in Mercurial (see, e.g. this changeset by Augie Fackler), I've been playing a bit with this and pytype. pytype is a static type analyzer for Python code. It compares with the more popular mypy but I don't have enough perspective to make a meaningful comparison at the moment. In this post, I'll illustrate how I worked with pytype to gradually add type hints in a Mercurial module and while doing so, fix bugs! The module I focused on is mercurial.mail, which contains mail utilities and that I know quite well. Other modules are also being worked on, this one is a good starting point because it has a limited number of "internal" dependencies, which both makes it faster to iterate with pytype and reduces side effects of other modules not being correctly typed already.

  • Two Books About the Kivy GUI Framework

    The Kivy Python GUI framework is intriguing. Not only it’s cross-platform but also supports Android. Java is too verbose and low level for me and Kivy is an opportunity for developing native Android apps without leaving Python. Outside of the Kivy project documentation, there are few third-party advanced tutorials that go in more depth than the official tutorials. So, before diving into the code of the Kivy demos, I wanted some books to explore more features and get a broader picture of the framework and what it can do. I found two potentially interesting books: Building Android Apps in Python Using Kivy with Android Studio: With Pyjnius, Plyer, and Buildozer by Ahmed Fawzy Mohamed Gad (Apress, 2019), and Kivy - Interactive Applications and Games in Python - Second Edition by Roberto Ulloa (Packt, 2015).

  • A Qt GUI for logging

    A question that comes up from time to time is about how to log to a GUI application. The Qt framework is a popular cross-platform UI framework with Python bindings using PySide2 or PyQt5 libraries. The following example shows how to log to a Qt GUI. This introduces a simple QtHandler class which takes a callable, which should be a slot in the main thread that does GUI updates. A worker thread is also created to show how you can log to the GUI from both the UI itself (via a button for manual logging) as well as a worker thread doing work in the background (here, just logging messages at random levels with random short delays in between).

  • Picolibc 1.1 Released With POSIX File I/O Support

    Longtime X11 developer Keith Packard has spent a lot of time in recent months while being employed by SiFive working on Picolibc as a new C library for embedded systems. Picolibc is designed solely for embedded use-cases at this point and was formerly developed by Keith under the name newlib-nano. Picolibc 1.1 is out now as the project's second stable release.

  • Picolibc Version 1.1

    Picolibc development is settling down at last. With the addition of a simple 'hello world' demo app, it seems like a good time to stamp the current code as 'version 1.1'.

VXL Launches CloudDesktop On the Go (CoGo), a Truly Portable Linux Micro Thin Client

VXL, a leader in thin clients, endpoint management and digital signage software solutions, launches its new, low cost, CloudDesktop On the Go (CoGo). An ultra-compact and highly portable USB key, CoGo repurposes legacy PCs into a fully functional Linux thin client. Available with a lifetime perpetual license and priced at a highly competitive $77 including first year support, CoGo offers users up to a massive 50% saving over equivalent software solutions. CoGo allows businesses to extend the life of ageing PC hardware by using it to access server-hosted computing sessions or virtual desktop infrastructure. Users simply plug CoGo into a PC and boot from it. The VXL Gio Linux firmware is instantly useable without overwriting the local OS and the converted PC can be managed as thin client. Read more

ALT Linux: Worthy Linux Alternatives, With a Catch

ALT Linux may have a problem with getting English language updates on some of its most recent product releases. The primary geographic audience it serves may not make English a top priority. Yet many of its products are available with the English language intact. The great variety of Linux distros available make ALT Linux a very viable source of options for anyone looking to sample the flexibility the Linux operating system offers. I like the starter kit inventory maintained by the ALT Linux developers. Distro hoppers particularly can focus on trying dozens of desktop varieties without having to adjust to separate distro designs. All of the ALT Linux distros share a common, simple design for ease of use and reliability. Read more