Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Reviews

Review: Reborn OS 2018.09.09 and Nitrux 1.0.15

Filed under
Reviews

This month I spent some time digging through the waiting list and trimming projects that have not survived the harsh and demanding growing period of their first year of existence. Among them I found a project which seemed simple on the surface, an Antergos-based distribution offering even more install-time options than its parent. What caught my attention was the specific list of extra options: 15 desktop environments to choose from, able to run Android apps through the Anbox compatibility software, optional Flatpak support, and the Mycroft desktop assistant. All of this on a rolling release base provided by Arch Linux.

The distribution is called Reborn OS and I downloaded what was, at the time, the latest build. Reborn is available as a 64-bit build only. The ISO I downloaded was 1.5GB in size and, booting from this ISO brought up the Budgie desktop environment. At the top of the desktop is a panel with the application menu, a couple of quick-launch buttons and a system tray. The Budgie desktop seemed to respond well once it finished loading and I was eager to get started.

Read more

GNU/Linux Review: Xubuntu 18.04 LTS

Filed under
Reviews

Xubuntu 18.04 LTS is an official flavor of Ubuntu Bionic Beaver which uses XFCE Desktop Environment. In this release, it's still as lightweight as before (~350MB of RAM at idle time), with user-friendliness you can expect as always. Yes, it still supports 32-bit so you don't have to buy new computer to upgrade or install it; for the next 3 years. It supports Snappy out of the box with GNOME Software integration. It brings Firefox 59, LibreOffice 6.0, and XFCE 4.12 for us, in only 1.3GB sized ISO image file. And yeah, in this review, I show you that Compiz works here with 3D Cube and stuffs we really missed from our old Ubuntu era.

Read more

New Manjaro Beta Builds a Better Arch

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Regardless of which desktop you select, the welcome screen introduces Manjaro tools and get-acquainted details such as documentation, support tips, and links to the project site.

You can get a full experience in using the live session ISOs without making any changes to the computer's hard drive. That is another advantage to running Manjaro Linux over a true Arch distro. Arch distros usually do not provide live session environments. Most that do lack any automatic installation launcher from within the live session.

Caution: When you attempt to run the boot menu from the Manjaro DVD, pay attention to the startup menu. It is a bit confusing. To start the live session, go halfway down the list of loading choices to select the Boot Manjaro option. The other menu options let you configure non-default choices for keyboard, language, etc.

After the live medium loads the Manjaro live session, browse the categories in the welcome window. You can click the Launch Installer button in the welcome window or launch it after experiencing the live session by clicking on the desktop install icon or running the installation program from the main menu.

Installation is a simple and straightforward process. The Calamares installer allows newcomers to easily set up the distro. It gives advanced users lots of customization options.

Read more

Review: Hamara 2.1

Filed under
Reviews

One of the more recent additions to the DistroWatch database is Hamara, a Debian-based desktop distribution developed by an Indian company. The project's website reports that Hamara is developed with the idea of making an operating system more familiar to Indian users, with particular attention paid to supporting the country's more popular spoken languages. The Hamara website also claims the company behind the distribution will provide commercial support though I could not find details on what services were offered or how much they cost. The support page has a contact form for people who wish to make inquiries into support options.

The latest version of Hamara is available in 32-bit and 64-bit builds. There is an ARM build too, but it is listed as a beta release and carries an older version number, suggesting the ARM branch may have been abandoned. When I was looking at the available download options, I noticed the project's FAQ page seems to suggest Hamara ships with the GNOME 3 and MATE desktops (or a combination of these technologies, another page claims the distro uses LXDE and GNOME 3) but I only found download options featuring the MATE desktop. The 64-bit edition I downloaded was 1.5GB in size.

Booting from the live media brought up a blank screen. There was no prompt, no welcome window and no visible desktop controls. The blank screen appeared both in VirtualBox and on my physical desktop computer. The display would remain blank until I switched to a text terminal (by pressing CTRL+ALT+F2) and then switched back to the desktop display (CTRL+ALT+F7). Once I had switched back to the desktop display, the MATE desktop would begin to load and the live session would present me with a working environment.

The MATE desktop uses a two panel layout. There is a task switcher in the bottom panel. The top panel displays the application menu, system tray and a second task switcher. The top panel's task switcher displays small application icons without text while the bottom panel displays a list of open windows with their title text.

Something I noticed early on is that the Hamara website and the ISO's filename indicate the latest version of the distribution is 2.1. However, when running the live media the system installer and the lsb_release program both label the latest version as being 2.0.

Read more

Antergos Softens Arch Learning Curve

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

If you are already familiar with the Arch Linux family but want a quicker installation method, you will appreciate what Antergos brings to the Linux table. Those who are less familiar with the Arch Linux methodologies are sure to be much less enthusiastic about using the OS.

This distro gives you some of the most popular desktop environments all in one download. If you are clueless about a preferred desktop, though, you will be stuck staring at the default GNOME option. Antergos does not provide users with an easy switching tool to change the desktop option. The live session ISO does not let you try out any other option either.

Read more

Here’s KDE Neon 5.13.5 : Based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and Uses KDE Plasma 5.13.5

Filed under
KDE
Reviews

KDE Neon 5.13.5 is the latest stable release of KDE neon 5 based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Bionic Beaver and powered by Linux Kernel 4.15 series. Features KDE Plasma 5.13.5 desktop environment, which brings numerous enhancements and new features.

As default desktop KDE neon 5.13.5, latest KDE plasma 5.13 offering new features called browser integration, which Firefox/Chrome/Chromium users can install the corresponding plugin from their browser app store to ensure that any downloads appear as a notification on the desktop. The Media Controls Plasmoid (widget) also allows user to mute and skip videos when playing in the browser, although this isn’t especially convenient compared to accessing the video controls in the browser itself.

Read more

AV Linux – An OS for Multimedia Content Creators

Filed under
Reviews

Ubuntu Studio is the OS I listed when I published an article on the Ubuntu distro you should use and I cited it as an excellent OS for artists and media creators. Today, I introduce to you yet another distro that was created for media projects and perhaps. It goes by the name of AV Linux.

AV Linux is an adaptable Debian-based distro that houses a large collection of software for audio and video creation. It is built with support for i386 and x86-64 architectures and thanks to its customized kernel, it offers users low-latency audio production for maximum performance.

As you would expect, AV Linux can run LIVE from a storage device or from a hard drive after being installed. So without further ado, let’s get to its feature highlights.

Read more

Review: Quirky 8.6

Filed under
Reviews

Quirky is an offshoot of Puppy Linux. The live distro is maintained by Barry Kauler, who until 2013 was the lead developer of Puppy. The main difference between Quirky and Puppy is that Quirky is experimental - its aim is "to explore new ideas in Puppy's underlying infrastructure".

The official introduction to Quirky consists of a few short paragraphs on the developer's blog. The last paragraph acknowledges that the page "needs to be filled out a bit more" and refers people who want to find out more about the distro to the blog's Quirky tag. There is also a link to the Quirky docs which consists of a single page that reads: "coming soon".

As I was not that familiar with Puppy I read most of the blog posts with the Quirky tag. The blog posts are rather technical and aimed at people interested in the underlying technologies. If, like me, you would like an overview of how to use the distro on a day-to-day basis then you are out of luck.

Read more

Previewing Ubuntu 18.10 Beta & How To Report Bug

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

This is a short review of Ubuntu 18.10 "Cosmic Cuttlefish" Beta for both your wishes to enjoy it and to contribute to its development. In summary, 18.10 features new Yaru Theme and GNOME 3.30, it will be released at October this year with 9 months official support until July next year. Also, this Beta release means our chance to contribute by reporting bug we find so we can help Ubuntu development process. I hope you will like it and enjoy contributing!

Read more

Summary of 5 XFCE Distros: Xubuntu, Mint, Fedora, Manjaro, Porteus

Filed under
Reviews

I write this small review of GNU/Linux distros with XFCE User Interface to help you choose a suitable lightweight, free operating system for your computer. Especially, to empower your old PCs and laptops once again. I present here five distros for you: Xubuntu, Linux Mint XFCE Edition, Fedora Spin XFCE, Manjaro XFCE Edition, and Porteus XFCE. All are lightweight. By looking at my criteria below, like, 32-bit availability and how small the ISO size is, or what special features are available and how satisfying the support is, I hope you can choose one most suitable for you. Let's revive our old machines and empower more our new ones with an XFCE distro!

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Programming: Developer Happiness, Rblpapi 0.3.8 and Python

  • Developer happiness: What you need to know
    A person needs the right tools for the job. There's nothing as frustrating as getting halfway through a car repair, for instance, only to discover you don't have the specialized tool you need to complete the job. The same concept applies to developers: you need the tools to do what you are best at, without disrupting your workflow with compliance and security needs, so you can produce code faster. Over half—51%, to be specific—of developers spend only one to four hours each day programming, according to ActiveState's recent Developer Survey 2018: Open Source Runtime Pains. In other words, the majority of developers spend less than half of their time coding. According to the survey, 50% of developers say security is one of their biggest concerns, but 67% of developers choose not to add a new language when coding because of the difficulties related to corporate policies.
  • Rblpapi 0.3.8: Keeping CRAN happy
    A minimal maintenance release of Rblpapi, now at version 0.3.9, arrived on CRAN earlier today. Rblpapi provides a direct interface between R and the Bloomberg Terminal via the C++ API provided by Bloomberg (but note that a valid Bloomberg license and installation is required). This is the ninth release since the package first appeared on CRAN in 2016. It accomodates a request by CRAN / R Core to cope with staged installs which will be a new feature of R 3.6.0. No other changes were made (besides updating a now-stale URL at Bloomberg in a few spots and other miniscule maintenance). However, a few other changes have been piling up at the GitHub repo so feel free to try that version too.
  • Episode #200: Escaping Excel Hell with Python and Pandas
  • Testing native ES modules using Mocha and esm.

Games: Steam, Devil Engine, City Game Studio and More

Security: Windows 'Fun' at Melbourne and Alleged Phishing by Venezuela’s Government

today's howtos