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Reviews

Review: 5 memory debuggers for Linux coding

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Linux
Reviews

As a programmer, I'm aware that I tend to make mistakes -- and why not? Even programmers are human. Some errors are detected during code compilation, while others get caught during software testing. However, a category of error exists that usually does not get detected at either of these stages and that may cause the software to behave unexpectedly -- or worse, terminate prematurely.

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Refined player: Fedora 23's workin' it like Monday morning

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Red Hat
Reviews

Like its predecessor, this Fedora comes in three base configurations – Workstation, Server and Cloud. The former is the desktop release and the primary basis for my testing, though I also tested out the Server release this time around.

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Ubuntu 15.10 review: Wily Werewolf leaves scary experimentation for next year

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Reviews
Ubuntu

If you want a desktop that's reliable, solid, but also pushing things forward—which is to say, if you want the experience Unity has been providing for the last three or even four releases—you will likely want to get the 16.04 LTS release coming next April. It will probably be the last Unity 7 release. But if you want to live on the edge, Unity 8 will be, if not the default, at least only a login screen away come this time next year.

In the meantime, enjoy your quiet days of Ubuntu 15.10. The days of such calm releases are limited.

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Ubuntu GNOME: the typical part of the family

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GNOME
Reviews
Ubuntu

If you like GNOME3, you will find that Ubuntu GNOME 15.10 is a good and reliable system for you. Apart from small performance issues in the browser, I had nothing major to report in the "problems" area.

Basically, as soon as you say "Ubuntu", you are already in the area of well-tested and problem-free all-rounders, especially if the distribution is officially supported by Canonical, the company behind this family of Linux operating systems. Any part of that family is the tool that you can start using out of the box, adding necessary components as and when they are necessary. For the most of us, the choice between the parts of the family is merely a choice of visual design of components and workflows.

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Screenshots

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Reviews

Fedora 23 Xfce review

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Red Hat
Reviews

A default installation of Fedora desktop has a very good security profile: FirewallD and SELinux, an application firewall, are active. So if you configure full disk encryption, your Fedora-powered machine should have a pretty good physical and network security posture. One tool that should have been installed, is the firewall-applet, a component of FirewallD that resides in the systray. Figure 15 shows the entries in the applet’s menu after installing it on my test system.

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Kubuntu 15.10 Wily Werewolf - Pretty useless

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KDE
Reviews
Ubuntu

I heard there's been a change of management with the Kubuntu community or some sort like that. Well, perhaps it's for the greater good. I am quite close to abandoning Kubuntu forever. Much like PCLinuxOS, it's slowly creeping toward irrelevance, offering none of the love and fire that you'd want and expect. It's exhausted, it's defeated. It just doesn't try to win you in any way. It's there because it exists. Nothing more.

Moreover, there's the matter of inconsistency. I mentioned this before, and I will mention it again. I absolutely loathe when things break in between releases. Small, simple things. Like Samba or printing or codecs. Why? WHY? WHY! How difficult is it to try to offer a sane, steady user experience? Why do I have to dread every single update? You can never really know. One version, things work, and then they don't. Samba sharing. Year 2015. How difficult can it be to copy files from one frigging computer to another without problems? It's not like sending probes to Mars. Just a bloody copy operation, source destination. Simple.

On top of that, Kubuntu 15.10 Wily Werewolf literally fails in every aspect. It's totally useless, it's buggy, it's crashy, and it offers nothing that would make it even remotely interesting. Nothing useful or practical about it really. Nothing. I'm sad. And angry. Avoid at all costs. 0/10. Bye bye now.

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Leaping in a new direction with openSUSE 42.1

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Reviews
SUSE

Of the three distributions, I think Fedora is closest to the cutting edge, with openSUSE and Ubuntu both fairly close behind. However, Fedora and Ubuntu have relatively short support cycles with Fedora releases usually supported for about 14 months, Ubuntu 15.10 for just nine months and openSUSE 42.1 will receive three years of support.

The best distribution for the job will depend on the person and, of course, the role the distribution is to play. I think Fedora is aimed mostly at more technical users and people who like to tinker. Ubuntu is aimed squarely at Linux newcomers who generally want to just use their computer and openSUSE appears to be aiming at a sort of middle ground: people who have a little Linux experience and want options, but also want reliability and longer support cycles.

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An Everyday Linux User Review Of Ubuntu 15.10

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Ubuntu still provides one of the best and most intuitive desktops for Linux.

Installing Ubuntu is simple and hardware support is handled brillliantly.

The repositories are full of great applications and the default applications within Ubuntu whilst small in number are well thought out and fully featured.

Unfortunately the one let down is the Software Centre. The software is old, tired, confused, unintuitive and fails to do the one thing for which it is designed to do.

My advice is to install Ubuntu and then get Synaptic. After you have done that replace Totem with VLC and Firefox with Chrome.

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Google Nexus 6P review: Android M and camera steal the show

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Reviews

So should you shell out your hard-earned money for the Nexus 6P? If you call yourself an Android lover, I would say the new Nexus 6P is worth the upgrade.

It’s got a premium body, a stunning camera, one that is perfect for snapping memories of your get togethers without any low-light worries and yes it comes with latest version of Android. As far as premium goes, the Nexus 6P offers the entire experience, and unlike other premium devices, does not cost a bomb.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

'Turbo Boost Max 3.0' and Mesa 17.2.4

  • Turbo Boost Max 3.0 Support For Skylake Fixed With Linux 4.15
    The platform-drivers-x86 updates have been sent in for Linux 4.15 and include a range of improvements for Intel hardware support. One of the bigger items is support for Skylake CPUs with Turbo Boost Max 3.0.
  • Mesa 17.2.4 Graphics Stack Lands for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 17.10 Gamers
    Canonical's Timo Aaltonen reports on the availability of the Mesa 17.2.4 open-source graphics drivers stack on the X-SWAT updates PPA for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 17.10 systems. Ubuntu systems have always lagged behind the development of the Mesa 3D Graphics Library, the Linux graphics stack containing open-source drivers for Intel, AMD Radeon, and Nvidia GPUs, but they usually catch up with it through a specially crafted PPA (Personal Package Archive) repository that can be easily installed by users.

OSS Leftovers

  • The Future of Marketing Technology Is Headed for an Open-Source Revolution
  • Edging Closer – ODS Sydney
    Despite the fact that OpenStack’s mission statement has not fundamentally changed since the inception of the project in 2010, we have found many different interpretations of the technology through the years. One of them was that OpenStack would be an all-inclusive anything-as-a-service, in a striking parallel to the many different definitions the “cloud” assumed at the time. At the OpenStack Developer Summit in Sydney, we found a project that is returning to its roots: scalable Infrastructure-as-a-Service. It turns out, that resonates well with its user base.
  • Firefox Quantum Now Available on openSUSE Tumbleweed, Linux 4.14 Coming Soon
    Users of the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system can now update their computers to the latest and greatest Firefox Quantum web browser.
  • Short Delay with WordPress 4.9
    You may have heard WordPress 4.9 is out. While this seems a good improvement over 4.8, it has a new editor that uses codemirror.  So what’s the problem? Well, inside codemirror is jshint and this has that idiotic no evil license. I think this was added in by WordPress, not codemirror itself. So basically WordPress 4.9 has a file, or actually a tiny part of a file that is non-free.  I’ll now have to delay the update of WordPress to hack that piece out, which probably means removing the javascript linter. Not ideal but that’s the way things go.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers