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Book review: OpenVPN: Building and Integrating Virtual Private Networks

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Reviews

The product specific book OpenVPN Building and Integrating Virtual Private Networks is a thorough and detailed manual on achieving a realistic and successful deployment. The authors in depth personal knowledge is warmly encapsulated in the content.

A week with SuSE 10

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SUSE

A series of events led me to installing a copy of Novell's Suse Linux Enterprise Desktop 10 last week. Given the hype that Novell had made around the distribution I was expecting to be impressed. And I was.

Fedora Core 6: Beauty or Beast?

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Linux
Reviews

After the usual new-release downloading frenzy died down a bit, I downloaded the 3.3 gigabyte DVD .iso image, stoked the boiler of my test PC, and put Fedora Core 6 through its paces. My mission: to determine if FC6 is suitable for production systems, or if it's better suited as a bleeding-edge testbed.

Fedora Core 6

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Fedora Core is often called a test version of Red Hat, but many believe that it deserves to be recognised as a fully fledged distribution in its own right. Led by a community and sponsored by Red Hat, Fedora is probably one of the most popular GNU/Linux distributions in the world, with users including Wikipedia. It recently reached its sixth release, so let's see what's inside.

Ubuntu Hacks

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I have recently been reading a book called Ubuntu Hacks by Jonathan Oxer, Kyle Rankin & Bill Childers, published by O'Reilly and Associates. I didn't expect to become a Grand Ubuntu Master by reading a single book, but I was hoping to pick up a few tips and tricks. If you want to really get to know Ubuntu, then you should grab a copy of this book and follow the bouncing dot.

Chris Tyler's Fedora Linux: The Best Book on FC so far!

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Remember what posted ten weeks ago? Review: Two RHEL4 and FC5 Books, Face To Face. It was about Christopher Negus' and Mark G. Sobell's books. Well, unless you're running RHEL4 or CentOS4, you might as well forget about them. Fedora Core users should consider Chris Tyler's book as their first choice. Obviously for a book issued in October 2006, it is dedicated to FC6 only.

PCLinuxOS - perfect halfway house

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PCLOS
Reviews

It's been quite the dilemma over recent months as to which Linux distro is the best choice for users moving away from XP (or "windoze" as it's affectionately labelled by some in the community). Instinctively the majority of users looked to Ubuntu and the user-friendliness of the gnome environment but it was brought to my attention that there's another major player in this exchange, a plucky little distro called PCLinuxOS, and here are my thoughts on it.

Mandriva Free 2007 - the FOSSwire review

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MDV
Reviews

I’m going to take a look at the popular Linux distribution Mandriva; more specifically, their latest free-of-charge desktop outing Mandriva Free 2007.

Using Unbuntu Christian Edition - a Review

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Reviews
Ubuntu

The last time I saw this distribution discussed it degenerated quickly into a flame war that had nothing to do with the merits of the distribution. Recently I saw that there was an update to the distribution. I had a bit of time so I thought I would take it for a spin and see what it was actually like. While this review is brief I hope to cover the major features that differentiate this distribution from Ubuntu its parent distribution and rate its overall usefulness.

Arch Linux 0.7.2 (Gimmick) Review

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Linux
Reviews

Arch Linux is an i686-optimized distribution that has been compared to Slackware for its stability (and it's use of BSD-style init scripts) and has also been compared to Gentoo in terms of speed. Arch Linux was created by Judd Vinet and is actually a Linux From Scratch (LFS) project. Arch uses pacman as its installation/upgrade tool and is similar in function to Debian's apt-get.

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Intel Beignet Is Working Out Surprisingly Well For OpenCL On Linux

Beignet is the project out of Intel's Open-Source Technology Center for exposing GPGPU/compute capabilities out of Ivy Bridge hardware and newer when using a fully open-source Linux stack. While Beignet differs greatly from Gallium3D's Clover state tracker, this Intel-specific open-source OpenCL implementation is working out quite well for Ubuntu Linux. While I've been writing about Intel's Beignet project since early 2013, it's probably been about a year now since I tried out the code, which is developed by Intel's OTC graphics team in China. This weekend I tried out Beignet v0.9.2 as trying out the newest Intel OpenCL code has been on my TODO list for a while and it's been working out rather well in my initial tests. Read more