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Reviews

Running Bodhi 3.0.0 Legacy on Older Hardware

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Reviews

There are many reasons why people use Bodhi Linux. Some use it because they really like the Enlightenment desktop, and Bodhi has pioneered the integration of Enlightenment to create a distro that is both beautiful, elegant and functional. Others use it because they want an operating system that stays out of their way. Again, although Enlightenment offers plenty of whistles and bells for those who need or want them, it can also be configured to be highly minimalist and use a very small amount of system resources.

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AntiX Linux: A Brief Review

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Fluxbox
Reviews

Certain factors like systemd are polarizing the Linux community. It seems that either you like it or you hate it. Some of the Debian developers are getting nervous and so a fork of Debian called Devuan has been announced.

I'm always looking at other distros that emphasize compactness and the ability to run on old hardware. I was also intrigued by the Debian controversy with systemd so when I saw AntiX 13.2 was based on Debian Wheezy I had to give it a try. AntiX comes on a single CD so installing it was easy enough.

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Mageia 5 Graphics Woes With Intel Broadwell HD Graphics

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MDV
Reviews

For the most part my Linux benchmarking of Intel Broadwell systems currently in the form of the ThinkPad X1 Carbon and Intel Broadwell NUC have been going great. Major Linux distributions tested on this latest-generation Intel hardware have been going well, but the first major failure I've run into on Broadwell was when firing up Mageia 5 Beta 3.

In trying to decide what new Broadwell Linux tests to run, I decided on a large Linux distribution comparison using the Intel BOXNUC5I3RYH with Core i3 5010U processor and HD Graphics 5500. When booting up Mageia 5 Beta 3 x86_64 this morning was the first time I experienced show-stopping failure of Linux on this NUC, where as Ubuntu and Fedora were running fine.

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PCLinuxOS, A User Friendly Linux Distribution

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Linux
PCLOS
Reviews


PCLinuxOS Linux distribution

PCLinuxOS is one of the many distributions that exist in the world of Linux, but this caught my attention when I installed it on my computer. Let's take a look at PCLinuxOS, a distro that is user friendly.
 

Read at LinuxAndUbuntu

Bodhi Linux 3.0.0 Released – Detailed Review and Installation Instructions

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Linux
Reviews

Bodhi GNU/Linux is a Ubuntu-based distribution designed especially for Desktop computing and is best known for its elegant and lightweight nature. The Distribution philosophy is to provide a minimal base system that can be populated with the applications as per user’s choice. The base System only include those applications which are essentially required viz., ‘Etecad‘ File Manager, ‘Midori‘ web browser, ‘Terminology‘ terminal emulator, ePhoto and ePad. Apt or AppCenter can be used to download and install lightweight applications in one go.

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Sony SmartWatch 3 review: Android Wear can be remarkably unremarkable

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Android
Reviews

Android Wear feels like it's nowhere near its full potential and that the only thing holding it back is Google. You could say there's a kind of courage in doggedly sticking with simplicity, in refusing to rush out functionality that would give it feature parity with the as-yet unreleased Apple Watch. I'd love to know if the developers inside Google are standing on that principle or just waiting to see how people react to what Apple has made.

In the meantime, we have unassuming watches like Sony's SmartWatch 3. Even if you're part of the tiny sliver of users to whom it's designed to appeal, you have to admit that there's nothing really special about it.

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Korora Comes Bursting With Extras

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Red Hat
Reviews

The GNOME desktop is well integrated into the Korora distro. Korora 21 also is available with the Cinnamon, KDE and Xfce desktops. Korora developers did an awesome job tweaking the integration of each desktop into the distro's performance. You must download each ISO file separately. Like most full-service Linux distros, Korora no longer includes all of the desktop options in one humongous ISO.

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LibreOffice 4.4 review – Finally, it rocks

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LibO
Reviews

LibreOffice is the flagship office suite for Linux. It’s also quite popular with Windows users. As a free, open-source and cross-platform solution, LibreOffice allows people to enjoy the world of writing, spreadsheets, presentations and alike without having to spend hefty sums of money. The only problem till now was that it didn’t quite work as advertised. Microsoft Office support was, for the lack of a better word, lacking.

Version 4.4 is out, and it promises a great deal. A simplified interface, new looks, much improved proprietary file format support. Sounds exciting, and as someone who has lambasted LibreOffice for this very reason in the past, I felt compelled to give this new edition its due rightful try. On top of Plasma 5 no less. So let’s see.

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Video Phone Review and Wider Thoughts

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Reviews
Ubuntu

I recorded and posted a video with a detailed review of the bq Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu phone, complete with wider commentary on the scopes and convergence strategy and the likelihood of success.

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Review: Nvidia's Android-powered Shield tablet is actually great for gaming

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Reviews

Nvidia followed that device up this past summer with what it calls the "Shield Tablet," an 8-inch device built to be a solid tablet, but with a clear focus on gaming. I've had one here for the last week, kicking the tires. And, let me tell you, it makes both an incredible tablet and an astoundingly good game console.

Let's get the "tablet-y" stuff out of the way first.

The Shield Tablet has an 8-inch, 1920x1200 display, which looks stupidly good and sports relatively big (for a tablet) stereo speakers on the front. Inside, it has 2 gigs of RAM, a beefy CPU, and it runs the latest and greatest version of Android (5.0,

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Debian and Ubuntu News

  • Debian Project News - July 29th, 2016
    Welcome to this year's third issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community.
  • SteamOS Brewmaster 2.87 Released With NVIDIA Pascal Support
  • Snap interfaces for sandboxed applications
    Last week, we took a look at the initial release of the "portal" framework developed for Flatpak, the application-packaging format currently being developed in GNOME. For comparison, we will also explore the corresponding resource-control framework available in the Snap format developed in Ubuntu. The two packaging projects have broadly similar end goals, as many have observed, but they tend to vary quite a bit in the implementation details. Naturally, those differences are of particular importance to the intended audience: application developers. There is some common ground between the projects. Both use some combination of techniques (namespaces, control groups, seccomp filters, etc.) to restrict what a packaged application can do. Moreover, both implement a "deny by default" sandbox, then provide a supplemental means for applications to access certain useful system resources on a restricted or mediated basis. As we will see, there is also some overlap in what interfaces are offered, although the implementations differ. Snap has been available since 2014, so its sandboxing and resource-control implementations have already seen real-world usage. That said, the design of Snap originated in the Ubuntu Touch project aimed at smartphones, so some of its assumptions are undergoing revision as Snap comes to desktop systems. In the Snap framework, the interfaces that are defined to provide access to system resources are called, simply, "interfaces." As we will see, they cover similar territory to the recently unveiled "portals" for Flatpak, but there are some key distinctions. Two classes of Snap interfaces are defined: one for the standard resources expected to be of use to end-user applications, and one designed for use by system utilities. Snap packages using the standard interfaces can be installed with the snap command-line tool (which is the equivalent of apt for .deb packages). Packages using the advanced interfaces require a separate management tool.
  • Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) Reaches End Of Life Today (July 28)
  • Ubuntu MATE 16.10 Yakkety Yak Gets A Unity HUD-Like Searchable Menu
    MATE HUD, a Unity HUD-like tool that allows searching through an application's menu, was recently uploaded to the official Yakkety Yak repositories, and is available (but not enabled) by default in Ubuntu MATE 16.10.

Tablet review: BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition

As employees have become more and more flexible in recent years thanks to the power and performance of mobile devices, the way we work has changed dramatically. We frequently chop and change between smartphones, tablets and laptops for different tasks, which has led to the growth of the hybrid market – devices such as Microsoft’s Surface Pro 3 and Apple’s iPad Pro – that provide the power and functionality of a laptop with the mobility and convenience of a tablet. Read more