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Reviews

A solid experience with SolydXK

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Reviews

SolydXK is a desktop distribution based on Debian's Stable branch. SolydXK originally began as an unofficial spin of the Linux Mint project, but has since grown into its own distribution with its own repositories. SolydXK is available in two editions, Xfce and KDE. While both editions strive to offer complete desktop solutions out of the box, the Xfce edition offers a faster, more resource friendly approach. The KDE edition provides more features and configuration options. At the time of writing, both editions of SolydXK appear to be offered as 64-bit x86 builds exclusively. I decided to try the project's Xfce edition (SolydX) and found the distribution's ISO was 1.4GB in size.

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Review: Manjaro Linux 0.8.13 "Ascella" KDE

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Linux
Reviews

That's where my time with Manjaro Linux 0.8.13 "Ascella" KDE ended. Overall, this distribution is quite polished, it seems to cater to newbies well, and I can't find much that is wrong with it. Of course, if I were to use it on a daily basis, there are other things that I'd have to get used to, such as the way KDE and its applications do things compared to MATE/Xfce, the way the KDE Kickoff menu is best used (because the KDE Lancelot menu does not appear to be available for KDE 5), and so on. In any case, though, I can heartily recommend it to newbies and more experienced users alike, and I would seriously consider using this on a daily basis.
You can get it here.

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Mint 17.2​: The year's best Linux desktop

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Reviews

I currently have nine desktops running in my office. They're running Windows XP, Windows 7, Windows 10 Build 10240, OS X Yosemite, OS X El Capitan beta, Ubuntu 15.04, Chrome OS, Fedora 22, and Linux Mint 17.2. Which one do I use on my main production desktop?

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Meizu MX4 Ubuntu Edition review: Second Ubuntu Phone has much improved hardware

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Reviews
Ubuntu

The Meizo MX4 is no regular consumer handset. You need an invitation to buy one; only the committed need – and actually can – apply. If you really want an Ubuntu phone, however, bearing in mind how rough-around-the-edges the operating system feels, then this is the best place to jump in.

The specifications are good on paper, and it looks stylish to boot. It’s an improvement on the BQ Aquaris E4.5, albeit not as big a one as it should be.

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Antergos – A Beginner-Friendly Arch-Based Distro

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Antergos is an Arch Linux-based distribution featuring a live environment and a user-friendly graphical installer. It aims to provide a pre-configured Arch environment “for everyone” with sane defaults which is easy to install and use, yet retains the flexibility and features of Arch Linux. According to Wikipedia, “The Galician word Antergos (meaning: ancestors) was chosen ‘to link the past with the present.’ ”

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Meizu MX4 Ubuntu Edition Review

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Finally, after months of waiting, the second Ubuntu Phone is upon us. The original – the BQ Aquaris 4.5 – was a serviceable phone but the poor specs and extremely early version of Ubuntu that accompanied it made it seem a lot more like an early development phone than something you’d use on a day-to-day basis. The low specs and shaky interface made it undesirable enough that our review for it was somewhat less than positive. Put simply, the hardware needed to be better, and the operating system itself needed much more love from the community and social media companies.

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Hands on review: Sony Android TV

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Android
Reviews

The beauty of Android TV is that it cuts down on your reliance on mobile devices for some tasks, particularly when it comes to multimedia. Now you can just flop down on the couch with the remote and watch your digital content the old-fashioned way. If this sounds appealing then Android TV might be for you. Even if you're happy to drive your television from your phone or tablet, Android TV might appeal to members of your household who aren't.

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Meizu MX4 Ubuntu Edition review

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Meizu might be feeling similarly anxious, as this is its first major release in Europe, having previously focused on producing smartphones for the firm's home nation of China.
Put simply, it's a Meizu MX4 - a mid-range device released in September 2014 in China only - with the original Android OS swapped out for the fledgling Ubuntu Touch.

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Semplice Linux 7 and the vera desktop

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Reviews

It has been a few years since I last reviewed Semplice Linux. The Debian-based distribution has changed in recent years and some people asked if I would revisit this project. According to the distribution's website, "Semplice is a GNU/Linux distribution based on Debian Unstable (Sid) with the goal to provide a simple, fast, lightweight and cool environment." In itself, this description is not unusual. What sets Semplice 7 apart is the project's unique desktop environment, called "vera". The vera desktop is briefly talked about in the project's release notes. The new desktop environment is based on GTK3 libraries (the same libraries which act as the foundation for the GNOME and Cinnamon desktops). The vera desktop ships with a new power manager, a screen shot utility and its own control centre panel. The release notes also mention vera ships with an interactive tutorial to help new users get acquainted with the young interface.

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HP 455 G3 Ubuntu laptop - Linux on a budget

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Hardware
Reviews

Canonical’s Ubuntu can be run on just about any x86 machine with a recent and compatible BIOS so who buys pre-loaded machines? HP clearly thinks there is a market for such a thing and recently announced three 15.6-inch laptops running the operating system, competition for a similar range of systems made by Lenovo aimed at the same market.

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More in Tux Machines

Radeon vs. NVIDIA Performance For HITMAN On Linux With 17 GPUs

Last week Feral Interactive released the much anticipated Linux port of HITMAN, which debuted for Windows last year. Now that there's benchmark support for HITMAN on Linux, I have been running a number of tests for this game that's powered by the Glacier Engine and making use of OpenGL for rendering on Linux. In this article are our initial AMD Radeon performance figures making use of the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver compared to NVIDIA's driver and the assortment of GeForce results published yesterday. Read more

How China Mobile Is Using Linux and Open Source

China Mobile is one of the biggest telecom companies in the world, with more than 800 million users in China -- all of whom are served with open source technologies. During the 2016 Mobile World Congress, China Mobile declared that the operational support system running their massive network would be based on open source software. China Mobile is not alone; many major networking vendors are moving to open source technologies. For example, AT&T is building their future network on top of OpenStack, and they have invested in software-defined technology so significantly that they now call themselves a software company. Read more

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

  • [elementaryOS] AppCenter: Funded
    A few moments ago, we hit 100% funded for our AppCenter campaign on Indiegogo. Thank you, backers! More than 300 people backed us over just two weeks to help bring our pay-what-you-want indie app store to life.
  • Linux Lite To Have These New Features In The Next Release Linux Lite 3.4
    ...we contacted the creator of the Linux Lite “Jerry Bezencon” and enquired the upcoming new features in the latest version of the Linux Lite. We have also done a review of the latest available distro i.e. 3.2 (32 bit) so that the readers can understand easily where are the new features headed towards.
  • Buy or Sell? What Analysts Recommends: CMS Energy Corporation (CMS), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • What Does The Chart For Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Tell Us Presently?
  • LEDE-17.01 is coming [Ed: it has actually just come out, just like LWN's paywall]
    For some years, OpenWrt has arguably been the most active router-oriented distribution. Things changed in May of last year, though, when a group of OpenWrt developers split off to form the competing LEDE project. While the LEDE developers have been busy, the project has yet to make its first release. That situation is about to change, though, as evidenced by the LEDE v17.01.0-rc1 release candidate, which came out on February 1. Many of the changes made in LEDE since the 2015 OpenWrt "Chaos Calmer" release will not be immediately visible to most users. The core software has been updated, of course, including a move to the 4.4.42 kernel. There are a number of security-oriented enhancements, including a switch to SHA256 for package verification, the disabling of support for several old and insecure protocols, compilation with stack-overwrite detection, and more. There is support for a number of new devices. Perhaps the most anticipated new feature, though, is the improved smart queue management and the WiFi fairness work that has been done as part of the bufferbloat project. It has been clear for some time that WiFi should work far better than it does; the work that has found its way into the LEDE release candidate should be a significant step in that direction. Your editor decided that it was time to give LEDE a try, but there was some shopping to be done first. Getting the full benefit from the bufferbloat and airtime fairness work requires the right chipset; most of this work has been done on the Atheros ath9k driver. So the first step was to go out and pick up a new router with ath9k wireless. That is where the things turned out to be harder than one might expect.
  • Microsoft Faces European Privacy Probes Over Windows 10
    Microsoft Corp. faces a coordinated investigation by European privacy regulators after it failed to do enough to address their concerns about the collection and processing of user data with a series of changes to Windows 10 last month. European Union data-protection officials sent a letter to Microsoft saying they remain “concerned about the level of protection of users’ personal data,” according to a copy of the document posted by the Dutch watchdog Tuesday. Regulators from seven countries are concerned that even after the announced changes, “Microsoft does not comply with fundamental privacy rules.”