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Reviews

Remix OS Fills Android Desktop Void

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OS
Android
Reviews

Remix OS is a big step in the right direction. More than with any other Android-to-PC release I have tested, this beta version provides the most complete Android experience on a desktop PC.

You get the best of both computing worlds. Provided your hardware is compatible, you can run a very modern Android version on both legacy and more modern gear.

If you do not require persistent memory, you can use it as a pocket OS and load it from a USB or DVD without doing a hard-drive installation. You have the added advantage of a more satisfying user experience on a standard computer screen.

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More hands-on with the Raspberry Pi 3: Bluetooth, OpenELEC, and Ubuntu MATE

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Reviews

Although I'm very pleased with the Pi 3, it is clearly still very early days for the new hardware. The one thing that every point listed above has in common is that they are all in need of an updated software release for one reason or another. So here's to the future!

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Reviews

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GNU
Linux
Reviews

Korora 23 Xfce review

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Red Hat
Reviews

Korora is heavily based on Fedora Linux, but it adds in useful packages that Fedora is not allowed to ship. I haven’t done a review of Korora in over 2 years, since the Korora 19 edition. I chose the Xfce edition because of the age of my laptop and the limited amount of RAM it can use.

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The MX Toolbox: Big Tools for a Little Distro

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Reviews

I very much like MX Tools. They are a handy, refreshing addition to the distribution, and they allow users who are not very tech savvy to solve some common problems. True, fixing audio and network drivers is hardly the first thing you want to do when you log in, but then, codecs and shares are an absolute must.

Overall, MX Tools work quite well. The GUI isn’t perfect though. It can be visually much nicer, the advanced tools need some rethinking and rework, and I’d like to see more features added, with aided step-by-step wizards that would help new users get comfortable with the distro, and quickly. Anyhow, I warmly recommend you try MX Linux, and then sample from its unique fruit. I believe you will find the experience pleasing, and perhaps we will see more endeavors of this kind crop across the distro phase-space.

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Solus 1.1 Mini Review – Lean & Fast, But Has a Long Way to Go

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Reviews

So my humble suggestion to the developers is that they should first put more manpower to improve the coding and getting rid of these nasty bugs. And once things stabilize (say from an year from now -- no need to hurry, all good things take time), then I’m confident that they’ll be easily able to optimize the system. Otherwise, Solus might run the risk of failing again.

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5 Free Alternatives To Google Drive On Linux

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Linux
Reviews

Google Drive is one of the most popular, fremium cloud storage service from Google. Gdrive is an official client for Google drive and a must have application for Windows. But sadly the most popular service can't be used on Linux via any official client like Gdrive. So I thought to find free alternatives to Google Drive on Linux and I came up with the list of 5 free cloud storage services that provide client for Linux. I know you'll love it.

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Review: The Galaxy S7 Is Samsung’s Best Phone Ever

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Android
Reviews

Samsung’s Galaxy S7 and Galaxy S7 Edge are attractive, well-built Android phones that offer great battery life and an excellent camera. Those looking to splurge on a high-end Android device should consider the Galaxy S7 or Galaxy S7 Edge.

But there are still a few drawbacks to consider. The glossy design gathers fingerprint smudges easily, which means you’ll have to use a case or clean it often. And Samsung’s software is still cluttered compared to that of Apple’s iPhone and Google’s Nexus phones.

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An Everyday Linux User Review Of Solus 1.1

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Linux
Reviews

Solus is at version 1.1 and therefore you expect a few small issues and I have had larger distributions such as Ubuntu hang on the odd occasion. I wouldn't overly mark Solus down for the issues that have occurred.

Where I would mark it down is that there isn't enough software available in the repositories. I know this will improve over time but at the moment there just isn't enough available to get by. This is made worse by the fact that Steam doesn't work.

The plus points are the good installer, the nice clean desktop environment and the fact that it does perform well.

The upshot is that if you can get by with just a browser, an office suite and a few other applications then Solus will be fine for you but if you need more choice then it might be a bit early to adopt this distribution.

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Korora 23 review

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Reviews

Korora Korora 23 is Fedora 23 plus some customizations and extra software installed by default. There are five different editions of Korora, each with a different desktop environment. There are ISOs for Cinnamon, GNOME, KDE, MATE, and Xfce, each of which is about 2GB in size. Unlike Fedora, where GNOME is the default and the other desktop environments are classified as "spins" offering alternative desktop environments, Korora does not make any one desktop the official default.

Each of the Korora downloads can be burned to a DVD or copied to a flash drive. The media will boot to a live desktop environment the user can test out before installing it to their hard drive using the Anaconda installer. The install process should be extremely familiar to anyone who has used Fedora. During the install process, the user will be able to change language and keyboard options; set the location, date, and time; configure hard drive partitions, configure the network; set the root password; and create a single non-root account.

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OSS Leftovers

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  • SUNY math professor makes the case for free and open educational resources
    The open educational resources (OER) movement has been gaining momentum over the past few years, as educators—from kindergarten classes to graduate schools—turn to free and open source educational content to counter the high cost of textbooks. Over the past year, the pace has accelerated. In 2017, OERs were a featured topic at the high-profile SXSW EDU Conference and Festival. Also last year, New York State generated a lot of excitement when it made an $8 million investment in developing OERs, with the goal of lowering the costs of college education in the state. David Usinski, a math and computer science professor and assistant chair of developmental education at the State University of New York's Erie Community College, is an advocate of OER content in the classroom. Before he joined SUNY Erie's staff in 2007, he spent a few years working for the Erie County public school system as a technology staff developer, training teachers how to infuse technology into the classroom.

Mozilla: Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society, New AirMozilla Audience Demo, Firefox Telemetry

  • Net Neutrality, NSF and Mozilla's WINS Challenge Winners, openSUSE Updates and More
    The National Science Foundation and Mozilla recently announced the first round of winners from their Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society (WINS) challenges—$2 million in prizes for "big ideas to connect the unconnected across the US". According to the press release, the winners "are building mesh networks, solar-powered Wi-Fi, and network infrastructure that fits inside a single backpack" and that the common denominator for all of them is "they're affordable, scalable, open-source and secure."
  • New AirMozilla Audience Demo
    The legacy AirMozilla platform will be decommissioned later this year. The reasons for the change are multiple; however, the urgency of the change is driven by deprecated support of both the complex back-end infrastructure by IT and the user interface by Firefox engineering teams in 2016. Additional reasons include a complex user workflow resulting in a poor user experience, no self-service model, poor usability metrics and a lack of integrated, required features.
  • Perplexing Graphs: The Case of the 0KB Virtual Memory Allocations
    Every Monday and Thursday around 3pm I check dev-telemetry-alerts to see if there have been any changes detected in the distribution of any of the 1500-or-so pieces of anonymous usage statistics we record in Firefox using Firefox Telemetry.

Games: All Walls Must Fall, Tales of Maj'Eyal

  • All Walls Must Fall, the quirky tech-noir tactics game, comes out of Early Access
    This isometric tactical RPG blends in sci-fi, a Cold War that never ended and lots of spirited action. It’s powered by Unreal Engine 4 and has good Linux support.
  • Non-Linux FOSS: Tales of Maj'Eyal
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KDE and GNOME: KDE Discover, Okular, Librsvg, and Phone's UI Shell

  • This week in Discover, part 7
    The quest to make Discover the most-loved Linux app store continues at Warp 9 speed! You may laugh, but it’s happening! Mark my words, in a year Discover will be a beloved crown jewel of the KDE experience.
  • Okular gains some more JavaScript support
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  • Librsvg's continuous integration pipeline
    With the pre-built images, and caching of Rust artifacts, Jordan was able to reduce the time for the "test on every commit" builds from around 20 minutes, to little under 4 minutes in the current iteration. This will get even faster if the builds start using ccache and parallel builds from GNU make. Currently we have a problem in that tests are failing on 32-bit builds, and haven't had a chance to investigate the root cause. Hopefully we can add 32-bit jobs to the CI pipeline to catch this breakage as soon as possible.
  • Design report #3: designing the UI Shell, part 2
    Peter has been quite busy thinking about the most ergonomic mobile gestures and came up with a complete UI shell design. While the last design report was describing the design of the lock screen and the home screen, we will discuss here about navigating within the different features of the shell.