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Reviews

Fedora23 - First Impressions

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Red Hat
Reviews

When you read my blog posts you know that I switched not that long ago from Manjaro, an Arch-based distribution to Arch. And now I switched again - this time to [Fedora]. Even so I was really satisified with Arch. It worked, it was fast and the Arch User Repositories are awesome. I rarely had to google how to install a software. I just had to use a wrapper to search them. And when I googled the first hit was often the Arch Wiki. Right now the Arch Wiki is probably the best documentation for Linux-related software.

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Enter the Void! First impressions of Void Linux

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Reviews

While Gentoo is a great way to spin your own flavour of Linux, after a year I’ve found that recompiling packages every time you do an update becomes a bit of a drag. With that in mind I decided to look around for an alternative distribution, and while nothing is 100% perfect I have to say I really am very happy with Void Linux. There are a number of “live” iso images which will happily boot from a USB stick, I only looked at two of the images Cinnamon and Xfce, while Cinnamon was all very pretty and all that, I couldn’t get the audio volume widget to show itself and besides I didn’t see any real advantage. I’ve long been a fan of Xfce basically because of what it doesn’t try to do, you don’t get the kitchen sink (thankfully) but what you do get works solidly.

Now its entirely possible that I missed something obvious with the void_installer script but it has two distinct behaviours depending on what installation source you choose. If you choose to install from the internet what you get is a bare minimum of packages (command line only) and you’ll be left with a fair bit of configuration to do for yourself – this isn’t always a bad thing if for example you have some specific use maybe an embedded kiosk for example. For more usual desktop use, its better to choose the installation media itself as the source, this basically copies and configures the “live” image onto your machine. I did find that after an update I had to manually delete the old kernel, but once I did that and a few more of the usual chores one normally expects when installing a new system – (eventually after correctly using the installer!) I found myself in possession of a really nice system.

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Apricity OS 12.2015 review - Apre Trouble

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Reviews

Linux, the final frontier. A fellow named Mehdi emailed me the name of this Linux distro for sampling, testing and review. Having already recommended a bunch of software in the past, with pretty good results, I thought this could be another enjoyable exercise.

To make everything all the more mindboggling, Apricity OS tell us it is based on Arch Linux, which means goats and blood and the essence of virgin nerds. Archy Arch and the Funky Byte. But maybe the dreadful can be abstracted into a nice and friendly product. Anyhow, version 12.2015 Beta, underway!

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Linux Mint 17.3 "Xfce"

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GNU
Linux
Reviews

Linux Mint Linux Mint is arguably one of the more popular distributions in the open source ecosystem. The project takes packages from the Ubuntu repositories and uses them, along with custom Mint utilities, to build a user friendly operating system. The Mint project has gained a reputation over the years for delivering a practical desktop operating system that offers users a familiar desktop environment with multimedia support.

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Hands-On: Kali Linux Light (Xfce) and Mini distributions

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Reviews

In my previous post, I looked at the Full version of the new Kali Linux 2016.1 Rolling release. That version uses the Gnome 3 desktop and includes a large number of security, forensic, and penetration-testing utilities. In this post I am going to look at the Light version, which uses the Xfce desktop and includes only a few security utilities in the base installation, and the Mini version, which lets you choose your desktop, but includes no additional utilities in the base installation.

It seems to me that there are two reasons for the Kali Light distribution. First, a lot of people don't like using Gnome 3 -- especially a lot of experienced Linux users -- so this offers a popular alternative desktop. Second, by including very few additional security packages, it lets you build up the distribution with just the tools you want and need.

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Kali Linux Rolling Released With Features That Make It The Best OS For Ethical Hackers

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Reviews

Kali Linux, a hacker’s favorite operating system, is here with its first Rolling release. This release ensures that you are always using the latest and best tools for pen-testing purposes. The first Kali Linux Rolling release also brings a Kali Linux Package Tracker tool and changes the way VMware guest tools are installed. You can read more about the features below and use the links for downloading Kali Linux Rolling 2016.1 ISO files and torrents.

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Kali Linux Reviewed, Release

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Reviews
Security
  • Hands-on with Kali Linux Rolling

    Kali Linux, long known as a premier security/pen-test distribution, announces a new release which is also UEFI compatible. Here are my experiences installing it.

  • Kali Linux, Rolling Edition Released – 2016.1

    Today marks an important milestone for us with the first public release of our Kali Linux rolling distribution. Kali switched to a rolling release model back when we hit version 2.0 (codename “sana”), however the rolling release was only available via an upgrade from 2.0 to kali-rolling for a select brave group. After 5 months of testing our rolling distribution (and its supporting infrastructure), we’re confident in its reliability – giving our users the best of all worlds – the stability of Debian, together with the latest versions of the many outstanding penetration testing tools created and shared by the information security community.

group test: NAS distros

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Reviews

What’s a terabyte to a data connoisseur? If you’re like us, you probably have more data than spare USB ports. While external drives are a great way to quickly and conveniently add extra storage, they have their drawbacks. For one, their data retrieval capabilities are restricted to the computer they are connected to. This might work for individual users with single PCs but isn’t a practical solution for a household with a variety of devices.

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Hands-on with piCore 7.0: Tiny Core Linux for the Raspberry Pi

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Linux
Reviews

This is going to be a tiny post (pun intended). The recent announcement of piCore Linux 7.0 caught my eye -- I have been meaning to try Tiny Core on the Raspberry Pi. The fact that they now have one distribution which will run on both Pi 1 and P 2 hardware was just the impetus I needed to actually download it and give it a try.

First, what is Tiny Core Linux? It is one part of The Core Project, which produces very, very small Linux distributions. Their smallest distribution is about 10MB, a size I haven't seen since the days when I was loading 7th Edition Unix on a Motorola 68000-based system. The distribution is modular, so it is easy to add extensions.

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Deepin Takes Linux to New Depths

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Linux
Reviews

The latest release of the Linux distro now called "Depth OS" deserves serious consideration. It is fast, reliable and innovative, with an impressive homegrown desktop design dubbed "Deepin Desktop Environment," or DDE.

Depth OS has a bit of an identity problem. It's not well known outside Asia and Europe, but that's not the major cause of confusion.

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More in Tux Machines

Command Line: FFmpeg, Coinmon, Tizonia

  • FFmpeg Lands OpenCL Improvements
    Besides a lot of NVDEC code landing for the next FFmpeg release, there's also been a number of OpenCL improvements that were just committed to this multimedia library's codebase. The work landed yesterday includes removing an older and experimental OpenCL API while introducing a new OpenCL "hwcontext" implementation. This in turn has introduced an OpenCL overlay filter and OpenCL unsharp mask filter.
  • Coinmon – Check Cryptocurrency Prices From Commandline
    A while ago, we published a guide about Cli-Fyi – a potentially useful command line query tool. Using Cli-Fyi, we can easily find out the latest price of a cryptocurrency and lots of other useful details. Today, we are going to see yet another cryptcurrency price checker tool called “Coinmon”. Unlike Cli.Fyi, Coinmon is only for checking the price of various cryptocurrencies. Nothing more! Coinmon will check cryptocurrencies’ prices, changes right from your Terminal. It will fetch all details from from coinmarketcap.com APIs. It is quite useful for those who are both Crypto investors and Engineers.
  • Command Line Music Player for Spotify, YouTube & Other Music Streaming Services
    Tizonia is a command-line music player that let you stream music from Spotify, Google Play Music, YouTube, Soundcloud, and more, straight from the terminal.

OSS: Configuration Management, Man(ual), Patent Traps (5G and the Internet of Things), Sponsored Development

  • 9 Excellent Open Source Configuration Management Applications
    End users at public and private sector organizations sometimes perceive IT teams a barrier to the development of the business. When the business demands new services and applications, it may take months before progress is made. Why is that? It’s too common for IT teams to spend too much time fighting fires; after all they can come from so many different sources. An IT team’s main responsibility is to maintain, secure, and operate an organization’s systems and networks. This, in itself, carries a huge responsibility. IT teams that maintain technology infrastructure, deploy applications, and provisioning environments with many manual tasks are inefficient. In modern environments, services are rarely deployed in isolation. Simple applications may need several services to run – such as a web server and a database. Deploying more complex systems, many services may need installing, configuring, and linked together. Streamlining system administration must therefore be part of an IT solution. And one of the most time-consuming activity for IT teams is the management of the business’s infrastructure. Automation minimizes manual work, reducing the risk of human mistakes, and offering the ability to quickly deploy new services and applications without risking reliability. Whether it involves container orchestration, real-time big data, deep learning, or stream processing, large software demands operations to be automated. Here’s where configuration management system software steps in. This software automates the configuration of machines to a particular state. Like any other tools, they are designed to solve specific problems in certain ways. The goal is to get a system from whatever state it is in, into the desired state. Configuration management software are the tools of choice for many system administrators and devops professionals. Cloud platforms enable teams to deploy and maintain applications serving thousands of users, and the leading open source configuration management tools offer ways to automate the various processes.
  • 'Gimme Gimme Gimme' Easter egg in man breaks automated tests at 00:30
    The maintainer of the Linux manual program man has scrapped an "Easter egg" after it broke a user's automatic code tests. On Tuesday, Unix systems administrator Jeff Schaller wrote in a Stack Exchange post: "We've noticed that some of our automatic tests fail when they run at 00:30 but work fine the rest of the day. They fail with the message 'gimme gimme gimme' in stderr, which wasn't expected."
  • Open source and standards – The path towards 5G and the Internet of Things
    Following the success of last year’s event, the 2nd workshop “Open Source and Standards – The Path Towards 5G and the Internet of Things”, jointly organised by NGMN and the ITU, took place on 1st November 2017 in Bellevue (Seattle), Washington, USA. The workshop was hosted by Microsoft and co-organised by the IPR Plenary of the NGMN Alliance and the International Telecommunication Union. Bringing together key representatives of a wide range of industry, including standards bodies, open source communities and academia, the discussions focused on how best standard-setting organisations and open source communities can capitalise upon each other’s deliverables and expertise for building a consistent and coherent 5G eco-system. With more than 100 participants, the workshop discussed how diverse stakeholders can rely on the respective strengths and development models to place a broad range of industries in a strong position to achieve the common vision for 5G and beyond.
  • Sponsored development is a win-win for users and developers
    There is a myth that simply by making a software platform open source, qualified people will give up their nights and weekends to contribute to its development. With rare exceptions, that's not how the open source world works. Building a community of contributors takes time, and complex applications often have a steep learning curve before a developer becomes comfortable working with the code. Open source software companies are the fuel behind a lot of software development, forming the communities and providing the financial backing that support it. And, like any other type of business, open source software companies need to earn money to stay in business.

Games: GameShell, GOG, Oxygen Not Included and More

Linux 4.15 Will Treat The HTC Vive VR Headset As "Non-Desktop"

Currently if plugging in the HTC Vive for a virtual reality experience on Linux, the head-mounted display (HMD) is treated just as a conventional display. But now with a new set of changes for Linux 4.15, the kernel will know it's a "non-desktop" display. Besides the DRM leasing support that has already landed during the Linux 4.15 merge window with the main DRM pull request, David Airlie has sent in another pull today for further benefiting SteamVR with Linux 4.15. (And among other benefits, also the AMDGPU priority scheduling landed too for 4.15 as another benefit for VR Linux gaming when using AMD graphics.) Read more