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Reviews

Android TV Review: Just What Your TV Doesn't Need

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Android
Reviews

The latest Android-based smart TV platform – cunningly called Android TV – is by my reckoning Google’s third stab at becoming a force to be reckoned with in the smart TV world. Actually its fourth if you also include the early and little-seen Android 4.2 Jelly Bean effort introduced on a few high-end Philips TVs in a handful of European territories last year.

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The New Solus: Putting the Pieces Together Again The New Solus

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OS
Reviews

Perhaps what is the most significant trinket in Solus is the desktop creation built into it from scratch. The developer created the Budgie Desktop as a new Linux environment written from the ground up. Budgie has grown from its inception in SolusOS through Evolve OS. Designed with the modern user in mind, Budgie focuses on simplicity and elegance. It has a plain and clean style. It is easy to use.

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HP ProBook 455 Ubuntu review

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Reviews
Ubuntu

For basic office tasks, the ProBook 455 Ubuntu isn't a bad desktop replacement, and Ubuntu has made big strides from niche project to a rounded OS that most people will adapt to comfortably.
Nonetheless, every one of this laptop's strengths seems to be countered by some related weakness. It's spacious and filled with ports, but clunky and heavy. Its operating system is feature-rich, but buggy. It's secure for now, but won't be in two years' time.

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Black Lab Linux Xfce 15.7 is out now. Distro Review and Installation Guide

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Linux
Reviews
HowTos

Black Lab Linux is all about power; it is a complete operating system and should work perfectly fine for all kind of Linux lovers. It is lightweight, boot time is pretty impressive, user interface is charming and working of the operating system is quick. Try it out now, our verdict; you will not be disappointed.

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Emmabuntus 3: take it all

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Emmabuntus 3 boots in to a standard Xfce screen with an Emmabuntus-themed wallpaper and a toolbar at the top. There is a menu button in the top left corner and several icons in the notification area in the top right corner: network, battery and volume indicators, as well as date, time and username.

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A solid experience with SolydXK

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Reviews

SolydXK is a desktop distribution based on Debian's Stable branch. SolydXK originally began as an unofficial spin of the Linux Mint project, but has since grown into its own distribution with its own repositories. SolydXK is available in two editions, Xfce and KDE. While both editions strive to offer complete desktop solutions out of the box, the Xfce edition offers a faster, more resource friendly approach. The KDE edition provides more features and configuration options. At the time of writing, both editions of SolydXK appear to be offered as 64-bit x86 builds exclusively. I decided to try the project's Xfce edition (SolydX) and found the distribution's ISO was 1.4GB in size.

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Review: Manjaro Linux 0.8.13 "Ascella" KDE

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Linux
Reviews

That's where my time with Manjaro Linux 0.8.13 "Ascella" KDE ended. Overall, this distribution is quite polished, it seems to cater to newbies well, and I can't find much that is wrong with it. Of course, if I were to use it on a daily basis, there are other things that I'd have to get used to, such as the way KDE and its applications do things compared to MATE/Xfce, the way the KDE Kickoff menu is best used (because the KDE Lancelot menu does not appear to be available for KDE 5), and so on. In any case, though, I can heartily recommend it to newbies and more experienced users alike, and I would seriously consider using this on a daily basis.
You can get it here.

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Mint 17.2​: The year's best Linux desktop

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Reviews

I currently have nine desktops running in my office. They're running Windows XP, Windows 7, Windows 10 Build 10240, OS X Yosemite, OS X El Capitan beta, Ubuntu 15.04, Chrome OS, Fedora 22, and Linux Mint 17.2. Which one do I use on my main production desktop?

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Meizu MX4 Ubuntu Edition review: Second Ubuntu Phone has much improved hardware

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Reviews
Ubuntu

The Meizo MX4 is no regular consumer handset. You need an invitation to buy one; only the committed need – and actually can – apply. If you really want an Ubuntu phone, however, bearing in mind how rough-around-the-edges the operating system feels, then this is the best place to jump in.

The specifications are good on paper, and it looks stylish to boot. It’s an improvement on the BQ Aquaris E4.5, albeit not as big a one as it should be.

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Antergos – A Beginner-Friendly Arch-Based Distro

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Antergos is an Arch Linux-based distribution featuring a live environment and a user-friendly graphical installer. It aims to provide a pre-configured Arch environment “for everyone” with sane defaults which is easy to install and use, yet retains the flexibility and features of Arch Linux. According to Wikipedia, “The Galician word Antergos (meaning: ancestors) was chosen ‘to link the past with the present.’ ”

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Linux Mint 18.1 Is The Best Mint Yet

The hardcore Linux geeks won’t read this article. They’ll skip right past it… They don’t like Linux Mint much. There’s a good reason for them not to; it’s not designed for them. Linux Mint is for folks who want a stable, elegant desktop operating system that they don’t want to have to constantly tinker with. Anyone who is into Linux will find Mint rather boring because it can get as close to the bleeding edge of computer technology. That said, most of those same hardcore geeks will privately tell you that they’ve put Linux Mint on their Mom’s computer and she just loves it. Linux Mint is great for Mom. It’s stable, offers everything she needs and its familiar UI is easy for Windows refugees to figure out. If you think of Arch Linux as a finicky, high-performance sports car then Linux Mint is a reliable station wagon. The kind of car your Mom would drive. Well, I have always liked station wagons myself and if you’ve read this far then I guess you do, too. A ride in a nice station wagon, loaded with creature comforts, cold blowing AC, and a good sound system can be very relaxing, indeed. Read more

Make Gnome 3 more accessible for everyday use

Gnome 3 is a desktop environment that was created to fix a problem that did not exist. Much like PulseAudio, Wayland and Systemd, it's there to give developers a job, while offering no clear benefit over the original problem. The Gnome 2 desktop was fast, lithe, simple, and elegant, and its replacement is none of that. Maybe the presentation layer is a little less busy and you can search a bit more quickly, but that's about as far as the list of advantages goes, which is a pretty grim result for five years of coding. Despite my reservation toward Gnome 3, I still find it to be a little bit more suitable for general consumption than in the past. Some of the silly early decisions have been largely reverted, and a wee bit more sane functionality added. Not enough. Which is why I'd like to take a moment or three to discuss some extra tweaks and changes you should add to this desktop environment to make it palatable. Read more

When to Use Which Debian Linux Repository

Nothing distinguishes the Debian Linux distribution so much as its system of package repositories. Originally organized into Stable, Testing, and Unstable, additional repositories have been added over the years, until today it takes more than a knowledge of a repository's name to understand how to use it efficiently and safely. Debian repositories are installed with a section called main that consists only of free software. However, by editing the file /etc/apt/sources.list, you can add contrib, which contains software that depends on proprietary software, and non-free, which contains proprietary software. Unless you choose to use only free software, contrib and non-free are especially useful for video and wireless drivers. You should also know that the three main repositories are named for characters from the Toy Story movies. Unstable is always called Sid, while the names of Testing and Stable change. When a new version of Debian is released, Testing becomes Stable, and the new version of Testing receives a name. These names are sometimes necessary for enabling a mirror site, but otherwise, ignoring these names gives you one less thing to remember. Read more

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