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Reviews

An Everyday Linux User Review Of Elementary OS Freya

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Ubuntu

Elementary OS is a really nice Linux distribution and if you are a computer user who has no interest in learning about the command line and you just want to use your computer for playing music, videos and games then it is perfect.

The effort that has gone into the desktop environment really pays dividends as it really is easy to use. Couple this with the ease in which it is possible to set up printers, scanners, audio devices and other peripherals and you have a really good operating system.

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Test upcoming Bodhi Linux 3.1.0; Pre-Release is out now

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Bodhi is a Ubuntu based Linux distribution, known for being lightweight and highly customizable. It comes with Moksha Desktop Environment and uses lightweight windows manager known as Enlightenment. The installer for this operating system is hardly around 550 MBs in size and it installs pretty fast; because it comes with only minimal set of software applications pre-installed as it claims to give user full control on how to populate their system with their required applications after the installation. The development team is working on completing the next major release Bodhi 3.1.0, so they have made Pre-Release version of this distribution available for download and testing. In this way, dev team will be able to fix any reported bugs and users will be able to get familiar with the look & feel, and working of new operating system.

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Korora 22 (Gnome3) Review: Works Right Out Of the Box & Includes Lots of Apps

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Korora is an old GNU/Linux distribution (originated in 2005) that used to be based on ‘Gentoo’. But in 2007 the development of Korora was abandoned, yet in 2010, it was reborn, but this time it was based on ‘Fedora’, rather than ‘Gentoo’.

But to be honest with you, I’ve never had used ‘Korora’ before. Yet, after installing ‘Korora 22′ (based on Fedora 22) and using it for the past three days, it’s goals became pretty clear to me. It is this good looking ‘Fedora remix’ that strives to be the ‘Fedora’ that hosts a mild attitude & a sense of practicality, although good folks at ‘Fedora’ don’t have that luxury. In a world that’s dominated by ignorance & selfishness, their struggle is a difficult one. I admire their courage.

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Zorin OS 10 Released, A Friendly Linux Distribution For Beginnners

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Linux
News
Reviews


Zorin OS 10 Released, A Friendly Linux Distribution For Beginnners

Zorin OS is a friendly user interface Linux distribution that any beginner can hand on. Basing on Ubuntu gives full support to most hardware and reach to 40,000+ applications from software center. The latest Zorin OS 10 has been released recently with the new selection of default applications and other improvements. Let's know more about Zorin OS.
 

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Android One (second-generation) review

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Android
Reviews

With Lava pixel V1, Google has attempted to revolutionize the budget smartphone market again but has not been able to do so.

The phone does offer good design, excellent touch response, smooth performance and decent camera, however at the same time lacks full-HD screen, 4G connectivity and the latest processor - features that are already available in various phones in this budget segment. However, users who value stock Android and priority updates may find this one to be a good option.

At Rs 11,350 the smartphone fails to compete with Lenovo K3 Note, which is available at Rs 10,000 and offers better features including display, processor and camera. YU Yureka Plus also comes with better specifications at a lower price.

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Review of Ubuntu Phone – A Work Still Under Progress

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Ubuntu

However, what one must remember is that the Ubuntu Phone is still a work in progress. The company is issuing updates every month and is relying on its current user base regarding the feedback and ideas. Right now, only three Ubuntu phones are present in the market ranging from $186 to $328 roughly. Ubuntu has been in hibernation mode for the development of this OS for a long time and it looked like they might be consumer ready now, however, after seeing the Ubuntu Phone it looks like they might be far from that scenario right now.

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Zidoo's 'X1' is a $59 Android media box that touts its 4K prowess

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Android
Reviews

Bottom line, the Zidoo X1 checks all the boxes when it comes to streaming and playing local media. The X1 is affordable with an MSRP of $59 USD and comes with a one year warranty. Despite its paltry specifications, the X1 was able to handle pretty much all movie files and streaming duties. The only concern would be how well Zidoo would continue to support the device via software updates. While this doesn't quite beat pricing from the likes of the Chromecast or the MK808B it does provide more features. While this is my first time with an true Android media box, I found that the experience as pretty seamless when it was all set up. While the X1 was able to stand up the challenge of 4K, the real question is: when will see more 4K UHD content that is easily accessible.

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OnePlus 2 Review Roundup: Solid Android Smartphone And Fantastic Tag Price

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Reviews

The OnePlus 2 will not become available in the U.S. and Europe until Aug. 11, but the first reviews of the Chinese startup's second flagship smartphone are already in, and the verdict is a resounding thumbs up from most people who were lucky enough to be given a preview build.

When it comes to the OnePlus 2's design, reviewers agree that the device has a solid, comfortable build thanks to the textured sandstone panel on the back and the slight convex shape that curves right into the hands, while still evoking that premium feel with the aluminum frame holding up the device.

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5 Best Linux Desktop Environments With Pros & Cons

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Linux
Reviews


Picture

If you are new to Linux then I'm sure you are giving up lots of time choosing Desktop Environment of your Linux Distribution. You are probably thinking to give a try to each one of them but that's very time consuming. Edit - There are other good DEs also That's why I'm reviewing the 5 Best Linux Desktop Environments with the pros & cons. The article gives you what you should know for choosing a DE. So let's get started!

MKVToolNix Review - Powerful Tool to Split, Merge, and Convert MKV Files

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MKVToolNix is a set of tools that can be used on MKV files, which is a video format that grows ever more present in our daily lives. The application falls into a very crowded niche, and there is not much competition for it. Nonetheless, it's a useful app, and it would be nice to take a closer look at it.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS and Sharing/Standards Leftovers

  • Linux Announces New Open Network Automation Platform Project
    The Linux Foundation has announced the creation of the new Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) Project with the merger of Open Orchestrator Project (OPEN-O) and open source ECOMP. This new platform will help in designing, automating, orchestrating, and managing network services and virtual functions by creating a comprehensive and a harmonized framework that allows virtual network functions to be automated by using real-time, policy-driven software.
  • Open-Source Networking Is Coming of Age
    Service providers of all sizes and types should take note of some changes occurring across the open-source community—changes that promise to accelerate the adoption of software-defined networks (SDN). The first is a decision by AT&T to open source the ECOMP management and orchestration (MANO) framework it developed via the Linux Foundation. Through a variety of working groups, the foundation has been accelerating the development of core network function virtualization (NFV) software and associated SDN technologies. But a big piece missing from that equation has been the management plane.
  • CAVO Continues to Advance Open Source for Democracy [Ed: Remember what Microsoft did there]
    OSI Affiliate Member, the California Association of Voting Officials (CAVO), has shared some exciting news regarding their advocacy work in San Francisco: according to the San Francisco Examiner, the city of San Francisco is pushing forward with plans to develop their open source election system. In addition, the paper is reporting that the San Francisco Elections Commission voted unanimously on Feb 17th to request $4 million to fund the initial stages of the open source voting system. For many years board members of CAVO have been urging San Francisco to expedite, "the creation and deployment of a GPL v3 open source / paper ballot printing system that would set the standard for voting systems nationally." According to CAVO, currently only New Hampshire has deployed a voting system using open source software, Prime III.
  • Mozilla Acquires Pocket, Will Open Source Pocket Code
    Chances are you've heard the new: Mozilla has acquired Pocket, the go-to 'read it later' service, and says it plans to open-source Pocket code in due course.
  • The Speed Of LLVM's LLD Linker Continues Looking Good
    LLVM's LLD linker still isn't too widely used yet on Linux systems, but the performance of this linker alternative to GNU Gold and GNU ld are quite compelling. We've written many times before about the much progress and better performance of "the LLVM linker" while some new numbers were committed to the LLD documentation.
  • Welcome to Code.mil - an experiment in open source at the Department of Defense!
  • DoD Announces the Launch of “Code.mil,” an Experiment in Open Source
    The Department of Defense (DoD) announced the launch of Code.mil, an open source initiative that allows software developers around the world to collaborate on unclassified code written by federal employees in support of DoD projects.
  • An Introduction to Open Data Kit

Leftovers: Software

  • Linux Command Line Browser To Surf Internet
    Links is an open source text and graphical web browser with a pull-down menu system. It renders complex pages, has partial HTML 4.0 support (including tables and frames and support for multiple characters sets such as UTF-8), supports color and monochrome terminals and allows horizontal scrolling. It’s very useful for low resources computers because day by day the web pages are bigger and heavier. If your computer doesn’t have a suitable performance you’ll have some mistakes while you’re surfing. So, Links is much faster than any common web browser (with GUI) because it doesn’t load all the content of a website, for example, videos, flash, etc.
  • Stacer – The Linux System Optimizer You’ve Been Waiting For
    System optimizer apps are quite the thing on platforms such as Windows and Android. Their usefulness, however, is debatable considering how notorious they are when it comes to using system resources. On the Linux platform, however, we can almost always find the applications, a developer puts their time in developing to be mostly useful. Stacer is one such app created to better optimized your Linux PC in the sense that it packs quite the list of features you’d normally expect from an optimizer and more to give your system a refresh whenever you feel the need.
  • Ulauncher – A Lightweight Application Launcher for Linux
    Each Desktop environment has the own launcher and doing their job nicely but it take a while to launch the application whenever we are searching. Ulauncher is a lightweight application launcher that loads instant search results, usese low resources, and remembers your previous choices and automatically selects the best option for you. It’s written in Python and uses GTK as a GUI toolkit. When you are typing wrong application name, after few words or spelling, it will figure out what you meant. Use Ulauncher to open your files and directories faster with fuzzy search. Type ~ or / to start browsing. Press Alt+Enter to access the alt menu.

Linux Kernel and Graphics

Security News

  • Windows 10 least secure of Windows versions: study
    Windows 10 was the least secure of of current Windows versions in 2016, with 46% more vulnerabilities than either Windows 8 or 8.1, according to an analysis of Microsoft's own security bulletins in 2016. Security firm Avecto said its research, titled "2016 Microsoft Vulnerabilities Study: Mitigating risk by removing user privileges", had also found that a vast majority of vulnerabilities found in Microsoft products could be mitigated by removing admin rights. The research found that, despite its claims to being the "most secure" of Microsoft's operating systems, Windows 10 had 395 vulnerabilities in 2016, while Windows 8 and 8.1 each had 265. The research also found that while 530 Microsoft vulnerabilities were reported — marginally up from the 524 reported in 2015 — and 189 given a critical rating, 94% could be mitigated by removing admin rights. This was up from 85% in 2015.
  • Windows 10 Creators Update can block Win32 apps if they’re not from the Store [Ed: By Microsoft Peter. People who put Vista 10 on a PC totally lose control of that PC; remember, the OS itself is malware, as per textbook definitions. With DRM and other antifeatures expect copyright enforcement on the desktop soon.]
    The latest Windows 10 Insider Preview build doesn't add much in the way of features—it's mostly just bug fixes—but one small new feature has been spotted, and it could be contentious. Vitor Mikaelson noticed that the latest build lets you restrict the installation of applications built using the Win32 API.
  • Router assimilated into the Borg, sends 3TB in 24 hours
    "Well, f**k." Harsh language was appropriate under the circumstances. My router had just been hacked. Setting up a reliable home network has always been a challenge for me. I live in a cramped three-story house, and I don't like running cables. So my router's position is determined by the fiber modem in a corner on the bottom floor. Not long after we moved in, I realized that our old Airport Extreme was not delivering much signal to the attic, where two game-obsessed occupants fought for bandwidth. I tried all sorts of things. I extended the network. I used Ethernet-over-powerline connectors to deliver network access. I made a mystic circle and danced naked under the full moon. We lost neighbors, but we didn't gain a signal.
  • Purism's Librem 13 Coreboot Port Now "100%" Complete
    According to Purism's Youness Alaoui, their Coreboot port to the Librem 13 v1 laptop is now considered complete. The Librem 13 was long talked about having Coreboot over a proprietary BIOS while the initial models still had shipped with the conventional BIOS. Finally in 2017, they have now Coreboot at what they consider to be 100% complete for this Linux-friendly laptop.
  • The Librem 13 v1 coreboot port is now complete
    Here are the news you’ve been waiting for: the coreboot port for the Librem 13 v1 is 100% done! I fixed all of the remaining issues, it is now fully working and is stable, ready for others to enjoy. I fixed the instability problem with the M.2 SATA port, finished running all the tests to ensure coreboot is working correctly, fixed the headphone jack that was not working, made the boot prettier, and started investigating the Intel Management Engine issue.
  • Linux Update Fixes 11-Year-Old Flaw
    Andrey Konovalov, a security researcher at Google, found a use-after-free hole within Linux, CSO Online reported. This particular flaw is of interest because it appears to be situational. It only showed up in kernels built with a certain configuration option — CONFIG_IP_DCCP — enabled.