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Reviews

Moto 360 Sport review: Best Android Wear smartwatch for recreational runners

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Android
Reviews

The Moto 360 Sport is a solid Android Wear device for recreational runners who don't listen to music when they run and I award it an 8.0 rating.

If it played music as flawlessly as the Apple Watch, Samsung Gear S2 3G, or Sony SmartWatch 3 then I would consider buying one as my running watch. However, if you don't care about your heart rate and want an Android Wear device to run with and enjoy music then the older Sony SmartWatch 3 is the watch to buy.

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First Look at Solus 1.0, the Linux Operating System That Rules Them All

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Reviews

After a long wait and a few delays, the guys over at Solus, a groundbreaking Linux kernel-based computer operating system, have finally announced the release and immediate availability for download of Solus 1.0 on December 27, 2015.

Solus has been in development for quite some time now, and it was previously known to the world first as SolusOS, and then as Evolve OS. Because of some trademarking issues with the name Evolve, the distribution returned to its origins, and it is now dubbed Solus.

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First Look at Solus 1.0, the Linux Operating System That Rules Them All

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Reviews

LG Nexus 5X Review - Raw Android experience for the masses

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Android
Reviews

The collaboration between Google and LG dates from a few years ago when the Nexus 4 made it to market. Fast forward three years and the South Korean company launched the third Nexus smartphone in partnership with Google.

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Android Wear Review: Taking The FIGHT To Apple Watch In 2016

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Android
Reviews

Many were hoping that Android Wear would signal the true start of the smartwatch revolution, and while Google's effort is easily the best we've seen so far in this particular field, there are issues that could prevent it from catching on in the way some have predicted.

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Review: Mint 17.3 may be the best Linux desktop distro yet

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Linux
Reviews

Linux Mint 17.3 is the final Mint 17 release and should put to rest any worries about Mint's plan to stick with Ubuntu LTS releases for its base. Mint has done what it set up to do, namely improve the Cinnamon desktop to the point that it not only matches, but in many places far exceeds the user experience found in other options like GNOME, and especially, Unity.

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Fedora 23 Workstation review - Decent

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Red Hat
Reviews

Fedora 23 Workstation with the Gnome desktop is a very reasonable release. I am surprised first and foremost by the advancement in the Gnome framework. It's usable, and there's no reason to hate it anymore. This shows how objective and cool I am, and that my past resistance was all legit techno babble. When credits are due, I'm a bloody bank.

Indeed, self praise aside, Gnome has reached a point where it can be used. 'Tis a paradox, because it was perfect before being ruined, and now it's approaching the same level of usability it had years ago. But if we put the background story aside, yes, it's okay, and it makes sense on top of Fedora. The distro itself also works well. It's stable, robust, the hardware support is really good, all my peripherals were properly initialized, all the network protocols ate their bits and bytes without hiccups, and with some extra pimpage, you have a pleasant, friendly system that can serve entertainment as well as state-of-the-art functionality.

There's a lot more to be done. Easier access to codecs, extra software, better Nautilus support, better desktop usability without hacks, tweaks and special utilities. And yes, make the distro run on my Lenovo laptop. What's up with that. But given my experience this autumn, given my expectations, all considered, Fedora 23 is good. I am cautiously optimistic around Gnome 3, and maybe, just maybe, it could come back to the family and be nice and dandy once again. If you're looking for a refreshing change from the ordeal of pain we have been inflicted so far, you might want to give Fedora a spin. Grade: 8/10. Something like that.

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Also:

  • 2015 Elections Retrospective by Fedora CommOps

    The results are in! The Fedora Elections for the F23 release cycle of FESCo, FAmSCo, and the Council concluded on Tuesday, December 15th. The results are posted on the Fedora Voting Application and announced on the mailing lists. You can also find the full list of winning candidates below. Now that the recent Elections cycle is finished, the Fedora Community Operations team compiled an Elections Retrospective report of how the Elections went.

  • Most popular email clients among Fedora users

group test: Lightweight distros

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Reviews

If this were a group test of distros specifically for older hardware, then Slacko Puppy would have been top dog followed by TinyCore, which is lighter but has a more involved setup process. However, the real test of a lightweight distro is on a machine that’s not necessarily old, just not adequately stacked. This is why we rated the distros based on their performance on the dual-core netbook, and the table below reflects numbers as measured on this computer.

WattOS Mate edition was quick off the blocks, but lacked any useful apps. The LXDE edition of the distro does include VLC but loses snappiness. We’ve rated it lower than the slow-starting LinuxLite because at least the latter welcomes the user to a much richer desktop experience. In fact, LinuxLite would be a good distro to introduce new users to Linux.

This group test would have easily been won by LinuxLite. It’s one of the fastest distros and loads to a very usable desktop straight out of the box. But it loses out to SparkyLinux despite being faster because of its memory usage, which is almost twice that of the winner. However, if you have the RAM to spare, then LXLE is our favourite LXDE-based distro around and it’s even faster than SparkLinux’s LXDE flavour.

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Mohu BeBox review: An epic mashup of Bluetooth boombox and Android tablet

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Android
Reviews

Boomboxes were everywhere in the 1980s. Throw in eight D-cells and you had a portable, all-in-one stereo system with a single—or even a double—cassette deck and an AM/FM radio that could go anywhere around the house, in your back yard, or to the beach.

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Arch Linux

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Reviews

I have a lot of thoughts on Arch Linux, partially because the project is so unusual in the Linux ecosystem. One point that stands out is Arch has some of the best documentation in the Linux community. The wiki is a very valuable resource, not just for people who run Arch Linux, but for the community as a whole and the wiki is an essential read for people who wish to try Arch.

Another point is that getting up and running with Arch Linux is a bigger investment in time and effort than most other Linux distributions. With most mainstream distributions we can put in the installation media, click "Next" through some installation screens, set up a user account and we will soon have a feature-rich operating system. Arch feels less like a finished product, like openSUSE or Linux Mint, and more like a collection of components we can put together however we like. I would compare it to the difference between buying a toy car and buying a model kit where we paint the individual pieces and glue them together. Putting together the model takes a lot longer and requires some skill, but what we end up with includes just the pieces we used and in the colour we wanted.

The flip side to Arch taking a long time to set up is that, in theory, it will be possible to constantly update the distribution without re-installing. This may be of benefit to some people, especially those who like to stay on the bleeding-edge of software development. Rolling Arch forward gradually may be less work (over time) than updating to a new release of Fedora or Ubuntu every six months. However, Arch is not likely to remain as stable as Debian or CentOS over five years as some packages will almost certainly break during that time period. People looking to install-and-forget a distribution will probably be better off with a long-term-support release that will remain stable for years while people who want to keep up with the latest software changes may find Arch less work in the long run.

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Also: Arch Linux review: Is it worth installing?

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AndEX Puts Android Marshmallow 6.0.1 64-Bit on Your PC with GAPPS and Netflix

GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton has released a new build of his Android-x86 fork AndEX that leverages Google's Android Marshmallow 6.0.1 mobile operating system for 64-bit PCs with various updates and improvements. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Future Proof Your SysAdmin Career: Advancing with Open Source
    For today’s system administrators, the future holds tremendous promise. In this ebook, we have covered many technical skills that can be big differentiators for sysadmins looking to advance their careers. But, increasingly, open source skillsets can also open new doors. A decade ago, Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst predicted that open source tools and platforms would become pervasive in IT. Today, that prediction has come true, with profound implications for the employment market. Participating in open source projects -- through developing code, submitting a bug report, or contributing to documentation -- is an important way to demonstrate open source skills to hiring managers.
  • FreeType Improvements For The Adobe Engine
    With FreeType 2.8.1 having been released last week, a lot of new code landed in the early hours of today to its Git repository. The code landed includes the work done this summer by Ewald Hew for Google Summer of Code (GSoC 17) adding support for Type 1 fonts to the Adobe CFF engine. Type 1 is an older, less maintained font format.
  • Are You Fond Of HDR Photography? Try Luminance HDR Application In Ubuntu/Linux Mint
    Luminance HDR is an graphical user interface that is used for manipulation and creation of High Dynamic Range(HDR) images. It is based on Qt5 toolkit, it is cross-platform available for Linux, Windows and Mac, and released under the GNU GPL license. It provides a complete workflow for High Dynamic Range(HDR) as well as Low Dynamic Range (LDR) file formats. Prerequisite of HDR photography are several narrow-range digital images with different exposures. Luminance HDR combines these images and calculates a high-contrast image. In order to view this image on a regular computer monitor, Luminance HDR can convert it into a displayable LDR image format using a variety of methods, such as tone mapping.
  • Opera Web Browser Now Has Built-in WhatsApp and FB Messenger, Install in Ubuntu/Linux Mint
  • Enterprise open source comes of age
    In the age of digitalisation and data centre modernisation, open source has come of age. This is demonstrated by the growth that enterprise open source software provider SUSE has enjoyed over the last months. “SUSE is in good shape,” says Nils Brauckmann, CEO of SUSE. “In the last year, revenue grew at 21%, and it was profitable growth.” Business is positive going forward, he adds, with SUSE now part of the larger mothership Micro Focus group following the completion this month of the HPE Software spin merger. “Micro focus is now the seventh-largest pure-play software vendor in the world, with revenues approaching $4,5-billion,” Brauckmann points out.
  • Red Hat, Microsoft Extend Alliance to SQL Server
  • UbuCon Europe 2017
    I’ve been to many Ubuntu related events before, but what surprises me every time about UbuCons is the outstanding work by the community organising these events. Earlier this month, I was in Paris for UbuCon Europe 2017. I had quite high expectations about the event/location and the talks, especially because the French Ubuntu community is known for hosting awesome events several times a year like Ubuntu Party and Ubuntu install parties.
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today's howtos

Korora 26

  • Korora 26 is Here!
  • Linux Releases: “Lightweight” Tiny Core 8.2 And “Heavyweight” Korora 26 Distros Are Here
    Korora Linux distro is a derivative of popular Fedora operating system. It ships with lots of additional packages that are provided by Fedora community and helps the users to get a complete out-of-the-box experience. The developers of Korora Linux distro have just shipped Korora 26 “Bloat.” Bloat codename has been derived from the characters of the movie “Finding Nemo.”
  • Based on Fedora 26, Korora 26 Linux Debuts with GNOME 3.24, Drops 32-Bit Support
    Korora developer Jim Dean announced the release and general availability of the Korora Linux 26 operating system for personal computers, a release based on the latest Fedora Linux version and packed full of goodies. Dubbed "Bloat," Korora Linux 26 comes more than nine months after the release of Korora 25, it's based on Red Hat's Fedora 26 Linux operating system and ships with the latest versions of popular desktop environments, including GNOME 3.24. Also included are the KDE Plasma 5.10, Xfce 4.12, Cinnamon 3.4, and MATE 1.18 desktop environments, all of them shipping pre-loaded with a brand-new backup tool designed to keep your most important files safe and secure from hackers or government agencies.