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Reviews

Linux Mint 2.2

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Linux
Reviews

masuran.org: According to the Linux Mint homepage, Linux Mint's purpose is to produce an elegant, up to date and comfortable GNU/Linux desktop distribution. In this review, I will take a look at Linux Mint 2.2 (codename Bianca) and see how the Linux Mint team delivers.

PCLinuxOS 2007 : Cool Looking Linux Distribution

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PCLOS
Reviews

linuxondesktop: PCLinuxOS is one of the finest Desktop Linux Distribution i have tried in past few years, it integrates some of the wonderful features of Mandriva Linux and adds a power pack collection of software. I have been a passionate user of Ubuntu and i can safely say if i had to recommend a Linux distro to someone new at computers it wont be Ubuntu but PCLinuxOS.

PCLinuxOS 2007 installation review and first impressions

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PCLOS
Reviews

Tryst with Linux: Never have I had such an incident free installation procedure before. Really! I’m not joking. There’s literally nothing much (in terms of problems) to report.

Xubuntu Gets Feisty

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Reviews
Ubuntu

linux devcenter: The third release of Xubuntu, the variant of Ubuntu with the lightweight Xfce desktop, appeared last month. Feisty Fawn (version 7.04) uses the final gold code of Xfce 4.4.0 rather than the release candidates in Edgy Eft (version 6.10) and Dapper Drake (version 6.06). I had very positive experiences with both Edgy and Dapper so I had very high expectations for Xubuntu Feisty Fawn.

Ubuntu 7.04 Review

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Software in Review: Ubuntu Linux continues to show steady improvement with version 7.04, but there's still room for improvement. Despite the handful of shortcomings in 7.04, this is the best release Ubuntu's yet had. If they didn't before, commercial GNU/Linux vendors should now feel quite threatened by Ubuntu Linux.

NeroLinux 3

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Software
Reviews

Techgage.com: It's hard to believe, but it's been just over two years since NeroLinux 2.0 was first released. At the time, it was a big step for Nero because the Linux market was already being hogged by k3b, X-CD-Roast and similar applications. The biggest kicker for consumers though, was the fact that in order to use the program, you had to purchase the full-blown edition for Windows which cost upwards of $80. So what is Nero trying to prove?

Review: PCLinuxOS 2007 Final release

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PCLOS
Reviews

Seopher: I've lost count how many times I've been here; sitting infront of Kwrite as I review the latest and greatest release from the PCLinuxOS team: PCLOS2007. It's been a long time coming and I've been getting increasingly anxious to see how this highly anticipated release performs. Let's see shall we!

New PCLinuxOS 2007 looks great, works well

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PCLOS
Reviews

Linux.com: PCLinuxOS is a live CD distribution that enables users to test Linux without actually having to install it. The highly anticipated new version, PCLinuxOS 2007, was released on Monday. Its intuitive selection of software, high level of stability and functionality, and the quality of the graphics make this the distribution's best release ever.

NVIDIA 100.14.06 Display Driver

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Software
Reviews

Phoronix: It was exactly one month ago that NVIDIA had delivered the 100.14.03 display driver and today we are reporting on yet another new beta driver in the 100.14.xx series. This time around we have our hands on the NVIDIA 100.14.06 graphics driver, which offers improved notebook support and fixes a variety of minor bugs.

PC-BSD 1.3.4 Review

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Reviews
BSD

All about Linux: FreeBSD along with OpenBSD and NetBSD form the triumvirate of BSD operating systems. Traditionally these BSDs are server centric operating systems - ie. those which are tuned to be run on a server rather than to be used by the end user as a desktop. Still, with a bit of tweaking and configuration, all the three of them can be used as viable desktop operating systems.

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