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Reviews

Looking into the Void distribution

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GNU
Linux
Reviews

Void is an independent distribution and offers a rolling release approach to package management. There are many Void editions we can download. There are Void images for the BeagleBone and Raspberry Pi computers along with builds for 32-bit and 64-bit x86 machines. In addition, there are spins of Void for specific desktop environments and we can download images for Cinnamon, Enlightenment, MATE and Xfce flavours. I decided to begin my trial with the 64-bit Cinnamon build of Void. The download for the Cinnamon image is 454MB in size.

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Top 5 Linux First Person Shooter Games Play On Steam

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Linux
Reviews
Gaming


top 5 Linux First person shooter games

Among many Games categories 'First Person Shooter' FPS for short has been choice of majority of gamers. If you were using Windows in past then you would've heard of FPS games Halo, Titalfall, Call Of Duty, Blackshot and many more. But.. Do we have such exciting First Person Shooter games for Linux. Well, there are many. Here I am going to list Top 5 Linux First Person Shooter games. Check them out and have fun on Linux.

Read At LinuxAndUbuntu

An Everyday Linux Review Of openSUSE 13.2

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Reviews
SUSE

There are people out there that will want all of the verbose options, giving access to every available installation option but maybe there could be a general installer and a custom installer to make it easier for the masses.

To be honest I found the openSUSE installer more difficult than the Anaconda installer that is shipped with Fedora and that has taken heaps of criticism over the years. Now I would say that the Fedora installer has greatly improved but the openSUSE installer still has some way to go.

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Leftovers: Screenshots

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Reviews

BQ Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition review: A promising start

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Reviews

The first 'production' smartphone running the Ubuntu operating system is finally here. Designed and marketed by the Spanish company BQ (not to be confused with the Chinese company BQ Mobile) and made in China, the first Ubuntu Phone is based on the 4.5-inch BQ Aquaris E4.5, which normally ships with Android 4.4. Included with the BQ Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition are two copies of the quick-start guide (in four languages each, one of the eight being English), a charger (with a built-in two-pin continental mains plug) and a 1-metre USB-to-Micro-USB cable. A comprehensive User Manual is available for download from the BQ website. The list price for the Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition, which is only available in the EU, is €169.90 (~£125).

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Parsix 7 Morphs GNOME Into a Better Desktop

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Reviews

Parsix GNU/Linux 7 is a feature-rich rendition of the GNOME desktop that you must take for a spin regardless of how you feel about the GNOME desktop.

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Lenovo ThinkPad T450s Broadwell Preview

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Reviews

This is a "first impression" review. I've had the system in my hands for all of about twenty-four hours and am still exploring and forming more solid opinions. Also any problems I had likely do have solutions, but as I said: less than forty-eight hours of ownership so I haven't had a chance to. Linux-centric system review will follow this weekend / next week.

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Torvalds' temptress comes of age: Xfce 4.12 hits the streets

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Reviews

Torvalds, in a now-deleted Google Plus post, had called Xfce "A step down from GNOME 2, but a huge step up from GNOME 3".

Xfce's biggest problem seems to be that no one sticks with it. Torvalds soon moved back to GNOME and, after experimenting with Xfce, Debian also went back to using GNOME as the default for the upcoming Debian Jessie.

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ODROID C1 review

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Android
Reviews

The ODROID C1 is a true alternative to the Raspberry Pi 2. It costs the same but brings Gigabit Ethernet, the option of using a high-speed eMMC storage module, and support for Android!

The Single Board Computer (SBC) movement is still going strong and with the recent release of the Raspberry Pi 2, it doesn’t seem as if it will lose any of its current momentum. The key selling point of the Raspberry Pi has always been its price. While there are lots of other companies that make these nimble little boards, there aren’t that many who seem to be able to match the Pi’s price point. Of course, some of the boards are only slightly more expensive than the Pi and do offer more functionality. For example, the MIPS Creator CI20 costs just $65 and includes built-in Wi-Fi and 8GB of on-board storage, two things missing from the Pi.

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