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Reviews

Book Review: Designing and Implementing Linux Firewalls and QoS using netfilter, iproute2, NAT, and L7-filter

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As is reminiscent of many of the books written by authors for Packt Publishing, the first chapter begins with descriptions and re-introductions to many of the basic networking concepts. These include the OSI model, subnetting, supernetting, and a brief overview of the routing protocols. Chapter 2 discusses the need for network security and how it applies to each of the layers of the OSI model.

Ubuntu Linux 6.06 Running on a Toshiba Satellite P20-801

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Ubuntu

From the offset I feel it necessary to say that this Toshiba notebook as I have found it is made for Ubuntu 6.06. The installation was distressingly simple and hassle free. The installation took just over 45 minutes with 1GB.

Xubuntu offers appealing desktop alternative

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Ubuntu

Sometime earlier this year my notebook, a low-end IBM R50e, got slow. It used to be reasonably zippy and Ubuntu worked extremely well on it. Then it just became downright sluggish and applications would often take ages to open. But having gone through the pain, and failure, of trying to install Ubuntu Edgy, I decided to look for an alternative.

Review: InnoTek’s VirtualBox

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Almost a month ago InnoTek, the co-developer of VirtualPC, released their Virtual Machine as Open Source. The software was formerly not targetted at desktop users, but that changed when it was released under the GPL. This review tries to shed some light on the question if VirtualBox can get some market share between Vmware and Qemu.

Nokia N800 Internet Tablet

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Nokia takes a second shot at building an Internet Tablet you'll actually want to use. Ars takes the new and improved N800 out for a spin, checking out the browser, its secret FM radio, and VNC (among other things). How does it stack up against its predecessor?

Ubuntu 7.10 Alpha 3 [Feisty herd 3] review and screenshots

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Downloading the iso was a little difficult to find the right download links. But then I checked out distrowatch who had a link to the iso directly. Ten hours later, it was done. I didn’t see anything different after booting from the cd.

Razer DeathAdder Gaming Mouse

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Recently Razer has been quick to push new products to market with not much time going by until a new gaming peripheral is out. What we are looking at today is the Razer DeathAdder. In this review, we will tell you whether this new gaming mouse can perform as well as the Razer Copperhead and Krait under Linux.

STUX live CD: Some technical difficulties

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STUX is a Slackware/Knoppix-powered live CD with the Morphix-like ability to build a custom ISO. While the combination has high potential, this implementation leaves something to be desired. It's worth the experience if you enjoy using new distributions, but if you're looking to replace your current desktop OS, look elsewhere.

A quick look at KNOPPIX 5.1.1

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Linux
Reviews

Because I've just received my copy of LXF90 (March 2007), and its DVD includes the Beryl-aware KNOPPIX 5.1.1, I thought I should give it a try. This is the second time in my life when I boot into KNOPPIX. I usually dislike live distros.

Book review: Beginning GIMP - From Novice To Professional

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So, you want a free software image manipulation program? You’ve always wanted to be able to smooth out your own photos? You’ve downloaded the GIMP, but when you open the program to have a go you just get intimidated? You can work out some of it, but you really want to optimise your use, and feel like you aren’t just wandering about in the dark? Where should you turn in this situation? Well your first stop should definitely be Beginning GIMP, From Novice to Professional by Akkana Peck.

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With Android One, Google puts itself firmly back in the OS' driving seat

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