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Reviews

Antergos Linux One Of Best Arch Based Distros

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Linux
Reviews

One of the most difficult tasks for Linux newbies is to install Arch Linux. Unlike most of other Linux distributions, Arch Linux does not have graphical installer. It's completely CLI. Users have always been interested to use Arch based distros and luckily there are many. Antergos Linux is one the best, beautiful and sleek Arch based distros available.

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Android apps on Chromebook review: Is it ready for mainstream use?

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Android
Reviews

Is Android on Chromebook ready for mainstream use? Not quite yet. But, I can see it from where it is now. I've long thought that Chromebooks could replace Windows PCs. Now, with Android apps, I can see people choosing $200 Chromebooks over $400 Windows 10 laptops. Windows' last stronghold, the desktop, finally has some real competition.

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ReactOS 0.4.1 review - Cold fusion

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OS
Reviews

Duke Nukem, Half-Life 3, ReactOS. What do they all have in common? An extremely long development time. In this article, we will focus on the last, a project that started in 1996 as an attempt to provide a free, Windows-compatible operating system to the masses.

Fast forward 20 years, ReactOS is a living, breathing entity, having recently reached a semi-mature 0.4.1 release. Lots of stuff has been happening under the hood, enough to warrant some real-life testing. Anyhow, here be Dedoimedo's first stab at this interesting little system.

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A Brief Look At Fedora 24

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Red Hat
Reviews

With the install done and the system rebooted, I was greeted with the default desktop. First impression? It's clean, and it looks nice. It's the exact same desktop, minus the changed wallpaper, that has been featured a few releases. But, for some reason, this new release just feels... cleaner. Maybe it's the crisper fonts the activity bar; maybe it's the darker wallpaper that pairs better with the black along the top; maybe I just like the new wallpaper more than past releases. Additionally, the animations feel smoother. I'm not sure if that's a side effect of Wayland, or if the developers sped up the animation speed slightly, but, whatever it is, I appreciate the slickness.

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10 Basic Linux Commands That Every Linux Newbies Should Remember

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Linux
Reviews
HowTos

Linux has a big impact on our Lives. At least, your android phone has Linux kernel on it. However, getting started with Linux just make you discomfort for the first time. Because on Linux, you usually should use terminal commands instead of just clicking the launcher icon (as you did on Windows). But don't worry, We will give you 10 basic Linux commands & important commands that will help you get started.

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Dell XPS 13 Skylake (2016) review: A lot for a Linux user to like

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Linux
Reviews

In the end I decided to put openSUSE on the laptop as it worked the best for me. I installed Arch Linux and couple of other distros in VirtualBox so I can play with them. I can run two VMs at the same time without any compromise on speed.

As far as the laptop goes, I love it. And I'll give it serious consideration when it comes time to replace my MacBook. The only issue that may hold me back is the lack of HiDPI support by many apps. But that will change with time.

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New Linux Lite Is a Powerhouse Distro in Disguise

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Linux
Reviews

Linux Lite 3.0 offers a great deal of flexibility and usability for both recent Microsoft Windows expatriots and seasoned Linux users. A new user application puts all of the needed information for using the distro in one spot. Just click on the topic and automatically view the information in a Web browser display.

All of the system controls and settings are located in the Settings option within the main menu display. Windows users will find a close similarity to the Control Panel in that OS. Even recent Linux newcomers will not need much exploring or head-scratching to navigate their way around Linux Lite.

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Ubuntu MATE 16.04: there is always room for improvement

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Who is the main audience of Ubuntu 16.04 MATE? From my point of view, these are people who started their Linux life a long time ago when GNOME 2 was one of few desktop environments available for Linux distributions. Since then, we have gotten a lot more players and forks on the "market".

Yes, MATE is better looking than GNOME 2 was a few years ago. But other desktop environments also did not stay the same during this time.

I used the Cinnamon desktop environment on Linux Mint for some time a year or so ago. For me, it was a much more convenient desktop environment than I found MATE to be in Ubuntu realization of it.

I also faced some crashes of different applications during my Live run of Ubuntu 16.04 MATE.

It all means that MATE team still has room for improvement.

Will I try Ubuntu MATE sometime in the future? Maybe. Let's see where history takes us.

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Android N 7.0 review - hands on, how to get it, best features, release date, name

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Android
Reviews

Bucking its usual trend, Google has been treating us to Developer Preview versions of its next mobile operating system, Android N. While its name is still yet to be officially decided, following Google I/O you're now able to try out Developer Preview 3, which Google is describing as the first beta-quality candidate.

As such, if you were sat on the fence as to whether or not to try it out on your main phone or tablet, now might be the time to jump in and get among the Beta fun. If you're already on the Beta, an OTA update should be rolling out to get you to the latest version. If you're looking to do a fresh install, instructions are below.

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BunsenLabs Linux

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Reviews

When I first started using BunsenLabs Linux I did not enjoy the experience. At first, it felt like installing Debian with a depressing theme and fewer features. The initial installation and configuration steps felt overly long and complicated. The Openbox environment lacked the features of fuller desktop environments while, at the same time, offering unwanted distractions such as Conky and extra virtual desktops. It would be fair to say the first two or three hours with Bunsen were unpleasant for me.

However, there was definitely a turning point during my trial. Around the start of the second day -- once I had a more colourful theme in place, the Conky packages had been banished and I had got into the habit of installing software I wanted from the application menu -- there was a point where I began to enjoy Bunsen. The distribution's hardware and multimedia support were top notch, performance and the interface's responsiveness were excellent and the applications available all worked properly. Openbox has enough configuration tools to make it flexible without being overwhelming. What really sold me on the distribution though was the way Openbox stayed out of my way, a feature I feel Debian's default desktop does not offer.

At the end of my trial, I still had some mixed feelings. As much as Bunsen grew on me, I couldn't help but feel the experience felt very much like installing Debian and adding the Openbox window manager as a session option. While Bunsen takes care of that step for us, it also adds several extra steps during the initial configuration that made me feel like going with plain Debian and installing Openbox might have been faster and easier.

In the end, I did grow to like Bunsen with its clean, fast user interface. I like the distribution's tweaks to Debian such as adding sudo and providing application menu installers. I think the initial welcome script should probably either be automated or ask all its questions up front and then go to work in the background. It took a while for me to get the interface looking the way I wanted it to and less like the inside of a mine shaft, but once I did the distribution provided a good set of default applications and desktop functionality.

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10 Best Open Source Forum Software for Linux

A forum is a discussion platform where related ideas and views on a particular issue can be exchanged. You can setup a forum for your site or blog, where your team, customers, fans, patrons, audience, users, advocates, supporters, or friends can hold public or private discussions, as a whole or in smaller groups. If you are planning to launch a forum, and you can’t build your own software from scratch, you can opt for any of the existing forum applications out there. Some forum applications allow you to setup only a single discussion site on a single installation, while others support multiple-forums for a single installation instance. In this article, we will review 10 best open source forum software for Linux systems. By the end of this article, you will know exactly which open source forum software best suites your needs. Read more

(K)Ubuntu: Playing' Tennis and Dropping 32-bit

  • Tennibot is a really cool Ubuntu Linux-powered tennis ball collecting robot
    Linux isn't just a hobby --  the kernel largely powers the web, for instance. Not only is Linux on many web servers, but it is also found on the most popular consumer operating system in the world -- Android. Why is this? Well, the open source kernel scales very well, making it ideal for many projects. True, Linux's share of the desktop is still minuscule, but sometimes slow and steady wins the race -- watch out, Windows! A good example of Linux's scalability is a new robot powered by Linux which was recently featured on the official Ubuntu Blog. Called "Tennibot," the Ubuntu-powered bot seeks out and collects tennis balls. Not only does it offer convenience, but it can save the buyer a lot of money too -- potentially thousands of dollars per year as this calculator shows. So yeah, a not world-changing product, but still very neat nonetheless. In fact, it highlights that Linux isn't just behind boring nerdy stuff, but fun things too.
  • Kubuntu Drops 32-bit Install Images
    If you were planning to grab a Kubuntu 18.10 32-bit download this October you will want to look away now. Kubuntu has confirmed plans to join the rest of the Ubuntu flavour family and drop 32-bit installer images going forward. This means there will be no 32-bit Kubuntu 18.10 disc image available to download later this year.

Suitcase Computer Reborn with Raspberry Pi Inside

Fun fact, the Osborne 1 debuted with a price tag equivalent to about $5,000 in today’s value. With a gigantic 9″ screen and twin floppy drives (for making mix tapes, right?) the real miracle of the machine was its portability, something unheard of at the time. The retrocomputing trend is to lovingly and carefully restore these old machines to their former glory, regardless of how clunky or underpowered they are by modern standards. But sometimes they can’t be saved yet it’s still possible to gut and rebuild the machine with modern hardware, like with this Raspberry Pi used to revive an Osborne 1. Purists will turn their nose up at this one, and we admit that this one feels a little like “restoring” radios from the 30s by chucking out the original chassis and throwing in a streaming player. But [koff1979] went to a lot of effort to keep the original Osborne look and feel in the final product. We imagine that with the original guts replaced by a Pi and a small LCD display taking the place of the 80 character by 24 line CRT, the machine is less strain on the shoulder when carrying it around. (We hear the original Osborne 1 was portable in the same way that an anvil is technically portable.) The Pi runs an emulator to get the original CP/M experience; it even runs Wordstar. The tricky part about this build was making the original keyboard talk to the Pi, which was accomplished with an Arduino that translates key presses to USB. Read more