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Reviews

5 Lightweight Linux For Old Computers

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Linux
Reviews

Do you have old computer? Have you kept your old computer somewhere in a rack? So this is the time to take it out and start using it. In this article I will walk you through the list of 5 Lightweight Linux distributions that you can install and use on old computers. All of these 5 Linux distributions require less resources therefore can be run on old desktops or laptops. So without any further delay let's dive in.

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If You Like Fedora, You'll Love Korora

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Linux
Reviews

Korora's use-it-out-of-the-box philosophy is one of the reasons the distro keeps getting better. If you want a better, more user-friendly Linux distro that reaches beyond Fedora's enterprise appeal, you can't go wrong with any of Korora's five desktop versions. It leaves little for users to desire and makes choosing another distro unnecessary to get your preferred interface.

Korora stays true to its mission. It promised an easier Linux for new users without sacrificing either power or features for seasoned Linuxers.

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Hands-On: First impressions of the Raspberry Pi 3

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Reviews

That's enough for the first evening with the new Raspberry Pi 3. The verdict, so far, is very positive. It's fast, it has added a couple of important new features, the most important of which is built-in WiFi, and it is still compatible with the previous Raspberry Pi models. What more could you ask for?

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Weirdest Ubuntu MATE Review EVER!

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Reviews
Ubuntu

In a recent video, I gave my viewers a fun walk-through sharing what makes Ubuntu MATE awesome and why I think it’s the perfect distro for newcomers. To that end, here are some of the important highlights of the video included in this article.

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ReactOS – Fake Or Potential Windows Alternative? Review And Extended Test Drive Of Latest Release

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OS
Reviews

After 10 years of development was released the new major release of ReactOS, this event was highlighted in the most biggest tech resources. But I’m not interested in just talk about release notes from “crazy Russian developers”, more interested is technical opportunities and possibilities.
Which architecture use React OS now, which hardware are supported, why users and developers might find it interesting, the degree of compatibility with Microsoft Windows? Is there a Windows-based copy with Unix-style? For these and other questions you can find the answers in this article (or ask new questions in comments).

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MX-15 review - Highway to rad

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Reviews

I'm impressed. Not like shiver me timbers, I'm dancing naked in front of a mirror while Manhunter plays in the background, but still quite amazed by what MX-15 offers. On the negative side, we have some visual inconsistencies, a geeky and slightly dangerous installer, a system area that needs shaping up, Fn buttons and volume (ground) control, and a few other space oddities.

Then, on the bright side, super fast, super lean, works great on modern hardware without hiccups or whining, excellent media and smartphone support, awesome battery life, a good collection of programs and wicked tools, and still more. Well, you know, you've just read the review, haven't you, you impatient conclusion-only pervs. Anyhow, really neat. MX Linux has come a long, long way since its early days. It is shaping up to be a really nice distribution, and my biggest fear at this point is that it will die, like so many other distros have died before reaching that critical mass moment.

To sum it up, if you're looking for something different, something less avant-garde, whatever that means, or rather, you're fed up with the love triangle of Ubuntu, SUSE and Fedora plus derivatives, then MX-15 might be what you want. Somewhat of an underdog, and a bit scruffy and mongrely at times, but I like the progress. I like the consistent approach. It's a key to greatness. 9/10. It sure has joined my watch shortlist. Worth testing and whatnot. But my fear of the future always remains, please prove me wrong. However, the present is happy, so start downloading and burning them coasters. Dedoimedo out.

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GNOME Tweak Tool Review - More Powerful than You Can Imagine

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GNOME
Reviews

GNOME Tweak Tool is a powerful application for the GNOME-powered Linux distributions, and it's too often overlooked.

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GNOME Maps Review - A GNOME App That Could Do Much More

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Reviews

GNOME Maps is a rather new application in the GNOME stack that doesn't do a lot but is really promising. Here is a quick look at the latest stable edition.

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Crowd-funded OpenShot 2.0 delivers graphic Linux package

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Reviews

While the cross platform aspect is nice, Windows and Mac OS both already have very capable, free video editors. The real winners here are Linux users who now have an editor that's on par with Apple's iMovie (even more powerful than recent versions of iMovie) and bears considerable resemblance to the industry-standard Final Cut Pro.

As I noted in my review of video editors for Linux, OpenShot was once the go-to standard for video editing on GNOME-based distros. And now with 2.0, OpenShot is back and better than ever.

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Review: System76 Lemur

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GNU
Linux
Reviews

Linux workstations are like recumbent bicycles. Most people agree they’re the most efficient and ideal solution, but the only people you ever see using them are tinkerers and bearded wizards.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Linux 4.15, Linux 4.16, and Linux Foundation's CNCF and CII

  • Linux 4.15 Gets Fixed To Report Current CPU Frequency Via /proc/cpuinfo
    A change recently in the Linux kernel led the CPU MHz reported value via /proc/cpuinfo to either be the nominal CPU frequency or the most recently requested frequency. This behavior changed compared to pre-4.13 kernels while now it's been fixed up to report the current CPU frequency.
  • Linux 4.16 Will Be Another Big Cycle For Intel's DRM Driver
    We are just through week one of two for the Linux 4.15 merge window followed by eight or so weeks after that before this next kernel is officially released. But Intel's open-source driver developers have already begun building up a growing stack of changes for Linux 4.16 when it comes to their DRM graphics driver.
  • CNCF Wants You to Use 'Certified Kubernetes'
  • Open Source Threat Modeling
    Application threat modeling is a structured approach to identifying ways that an adversary might try to attack an application and then designing mitigations to prevent, detect or reduce the impact of those attacks. The description of an application’s threat model is identified as one of the criteria for the Linux CII Best Practises Silver badge.

Linux World Domination and Microsoft Corruption in Munich

Programming/Development: 'DevOps', NumPy, Google SLING

  • 5 DevOps leadership priorities in 2018
    This week, DevOps professionals gathered in San Francisco to talk about the state of DevOps in the enterprise. At 1,400 attendees, the sold-out DevOps Enterprise Summit has doubled in size since 2014 – a testament to the growth of the DevOps movement itself. With an ear to this event and an eye on the explosion of tweets coming out of it, here are five key priorities we think IT leaders should be aware of as they take their DevOps efforts into the new year.
  • NumPy Plan for dropping Python 2.7 support
    The Python core team plans to stop supporting Python 2 in 2020. The NumPy project has supported both Python 2 and Python 3 in parallel since 2010, and has found that supporting Python 2 is an increasing burden on our limited resources; thus, we plan to eventually drop Python 2 support as well. Now that we're entering the final years of community-supported Python 2, the NumPy project wants to clarify our plans, with the goal of to helping our downstream ecosystem make plans and accomplish the transition with as little disruption as possible.
  • Google SLING: An Open Source Natural Language Parser
    Google Research has just released an open source project that might be of interest if you are into natural language processing. SLING is a combination of recurrent neural networks and frame based parsing. Natural language parsing is an important topic. You can get meaning from structure and parsing is how you get structure. It is important in processing both text and voice. If you have any hope that Siri, Cortana or Alexa are going to get any better then you need to have better natural language understanding - not just the slot and filler systems currently in use.