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Reviews

The friendly face of Linux Lite 2.6

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Reviews

I greatly enjoyed my time with Linux Lite 2.6. The distribution does a lot of things well, is easy to set up and use and the project offers us a lot of beginner friendly documentation. Linux Lite provides a great balance of speed, user friendliness, features and stability.

I like that Linux Lite manages to live up to its name by using few resources while still looking nice, the distribution manages to provide a stable base while shipping with up to date desktop applications and it offers good hardware support too. It is especially nice to see a distribution provide a control panel similar to the OpenMandriva Control Centre. This is one of the features I have most wanted to see adopted by distributions outside of the OpenMandriva family and it's nice to see Linux Lite take the lead on this one.

Lite ships with a good deal of functionality, providing users with most of the desktop software they are likely to need without, I'm happy to report, bogging down the application menu with a lot of extras, I feel a good balance was struck with regards to the default applications. Plus, I like that Lite offers us multimedia support out of the box.

Mostly, what I appreciated about Linux Lite was the distribution's sense of polish. I don't mean visually, though I did enjoy Lite's default look, I mean polish in the sense that the little details were addressed. Most distributions will have some small bugs or quirks or little annoyances. Perhaps too many notification messages or an application that won't launch or the software manager will not always run properly because PackageKit refuses to relinquish its lock on the package database. Linux Lite, by contrast, offered a smooth, pleasant experience. The one bug I ran into was with the system installer locking up when I attempted to use Btrfs as my root file system. Otherwise, I had a completely trouble-free experience with Lite. The documentation was helpful, the system was responsive, no applications crashed, there were no annoying notifications and the package manager worked as expected. I came away from my trial with Lite sharing the opinion that Linux Lite deserves more credit than it gets.

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Nexus 6P review: the best Android phone

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Android
Reviews

If you compare it to the other "premium" phones like the iPhone 6S, Galaxy S6, or Note 5, you're going to end up finding yourself putting a different set of things on your decision scales than before. With the Note 5: is a slightly better camera and a stylus worth $240 more, or would you rather have a clean Android experience? And the iPhone 6S: is iOS's superior app ecosystem and 3D Touch worth $150 more,7 or do you live in Google's ecosystem and want Google Now on Tap?

I'm not going to answer those questions for you here, only point out the remarkable fact that with the 6P, these are the questions now. Call it the premium category, call it the big leagues, call it whatever you what: the Nexus 6P and Google are competing at a different level than they did before. The Nexus was always a good Android phone, sometimes a great one, but never the best one.

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A Review Of Minimalist Hardcore Platformer INK

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Linux
Reviews

INK was released for Linux in August; two weeks after the Windows release. It took us a while to realize it was out though, so we first didn't cover it, and then forgot about it until now.

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Nexus 6P Review: This Is The Android Device That You’ve Been Waiting For

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Android
Reviews

But next year? Make your own phone, Google. You can do it. I feel like this is a massive competitive advantage for Apple. When you pick up one of the new iPhones, you can just tell that nobody had their grubby hands on any part of the device or OS design but Apple. It’s time to take the training wheels off for good, Google, and own the entire experience. After that, getting people to convert from other platforms will be a slam dunk.

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Android 6.0 Marshmallow review: Google Now is more important than ever

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Android
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After several days of using Marshmallow, you almost forget it's there: this feels more like Android 5.2 than 6.0. That's partly due to apps like Gmail and Google Maps getting updated separately, but partly due to the maturity of Android as a mobile OS. Perhaps from this point on, things like improved battery life, a smarter Google Now and a bunch of smaller tweaks will be big parts of each new edition of the software.

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Nexus 5X and Nexus 6P review: The true flagships of the Android ecosystem

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Android
Reviews

This year, we see a gap widening between Nexus devices and every other Android phone. If you're buying an Android device and want the fastest updates, the longest update support time, the best security program, zero crapware, the best software design, a cohesive app ecosystem, and the latest features from Google, you need to buy a Nexus. Every other Android phone pales in comparison to the Nexus 5X and 6P.

Before buying a Nexus meant you had to deal with a bad camera or poor battery life, but the Nexus 5X and 6P are the first Android devices with built with few-to-no compromises. The one thing you could complain about is the lack of wireless charging, but we can deal with that. The camera on a Nexus is finally good. The 12.3 MP cameras can hang with phones that are nearly twice the price of the 5X.

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BackBox Linux 4.4 review

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Linux
Reviews

BackBox Linux is a distribution that provides the best penetration testing, incident response, computer forensics, and intelligence gathering applications in a user-friendly desktop distribution.

It’s based on Ubuntu, but uses a resource-friendly desktop environment called Xfce.

BackBox Linux 4.4 was released a few days ago, barely three months after the release of BackBox 4.3.

This article presents a summary review of the latest edition – BackBox Linux 4.4, which is based on Ubuntu 14.04.3.

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Youtube-DL A Command-Line & GUI Youtube, Facebook, Dailymotion Videos Downloading Tool For Linux

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Linux
Reviews
HowTos


youtube-dl command-line & gui video downloader for linux

Youtube-DL is a command line tool, developed in Python to download videos from various popular websites including Youtube, Dailymotion, facebook, photobucket and many others. A list of supported video sites is available here. Youtube-dl downloads videos right from the terminal with simply understandble commands. If you like to work with terminal then I am sure you'll like youtube-dl.

Read At LinuxAndUbuntu

Hands-On with openSuSE Leap RC1: A walk through of the installer

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Reviews
SUSE

The openSuSE Linux 42.1 Leap Release Candidate 1 (whew, that was a mouthful) was made available on their download page yesterday (click on 'switch to Development Version' at the top of the page to get it). Although I will be running their Tumbleweed advanced development version on most of my computers, I am planning on keeping Leap on one or two of them, so I have been downloading and trying the pre-releases as Leap development has progressed.

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Also: openSUSE Leap 42.1 Release Candidate Brings Linux Kernel 4.1.10 LTS, LibreOffice 5

Android 6.0 Marshmallow review

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Android
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It's muddier than ever with Android 6.0. Now on Tap has the potential to give Google insight into apps, just like it knows everything about the web — as long as Google can keep it useful enough to entice users to long-press that home button. There might be privacy implications to worry about, though Google has insisted that it doesn't store that search data.

Assuming Google can improve Now on Tap (and quell privacy concerns), it might need to think about another rebranding. Google itself got a new logo, maybe Android is going to need a new name soon. The best candidate is obvious: Google OS.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Mesa's Shader Cache Will Now Occupy Less Disk Space
    Mesa previously had a hard-coded limit to not take up more than 10% of your HDD/SSD storage, but now that limit has been halved. In a change to Mesa 17.2-dev Git and primed for back-porting to Mesa 17.1, Timothy Arceri has lowered the cache size limit to 5% of the disk space. He noted in the commit, "Modern disks are extremely large and are only going to get bigger. Usage has shown frequent Mesa upgrades can result in the cache growing very fast i.e. wasting a lot of disk space unnecessarily. 5% seems like a more reasonable default."
  • Amazon EC2 Cloud Benchmarks vs. AMD Ryzen, Various AMD/Intel Systems
  • Epiphany 3.25.1 Released, Ported To Meson
    Epiphany 3.25.1 has been released as the latest update for GNOME's Web Browser in what will be part of GNOME 3.26 this September. Epiphany 3.25.1 has continued the trend by other GNOME components in porting to the Meson build system. With Epiphany 3.25.1, Meson is present and its Autotools build system has been removed.
  • Tumbleweed Snapshots Update Fonts, Perl, Python Packages
    openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots this week gave many newer versions of Perl and Python packages, but several other packages were updated in the repositories including some open fonts. Google and Adobe fonts were updated in snapshots 20170424 and 20170420 with google-croscore-fonts and adobe-sourcehansans-fonts being added to the repositories respectively.
  • 3 cool features in Ubuntu 17.04
    April showers bring May flowers, and fresh versions of Ubuntu too. Canonical’s latest official Ubuntu release—17.04—arrived this month after news of the death of Unity 8 and the return to the GNOME desktop in 2018. For now, Ubuntu is still shipping with its Unity desktop. I wrote earlier that most users who need stability and support over new features will probably want to stick with Ubuntu 16.04, which was released last April, until Ubuntu 18.04 arrives a year from now. However, there are a few small things in Ubuntu 17.04 that will appeal to users who are keen to get all the newest updates.
  • Linux Security and Isolation APIs course in Munich (17-19 July 2017)
    I've scheduled the first public instance of my "Linux Security and Isolation APIs" course to take place in Munich, Germany on 17-19 July 2017. (I've already run the course a few times very successfully in non-public settings.) This three-day course provides a deep understanding of the low-level Linux features (set-UID/set-GID programs, capabilities, namespaces, cgroups, and seccomp) used to build container, virtualization, and sandboxing technologies. The course format is a mixture of theory and practical.

more of today's howtos

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Microsoft Begs, Bugs, and Bug Doors

  • Don't install our buggy Windows 10 Creators Update, begs Microsoft
    Microsoft has urged non-tech-savvy people – or anyone who just wants a stable computer – to not download and install this year's biggest revision to Windows by hand. And that's because it may well bork your machine. It's been two weeks since Microsoft made its Creators Update available, and we were previously warned it will be a trickle-out rather than a massive rollout. Now, Redmond has urged users to stop manually fetching and installing the code, and instead wait for it to be automatically offered to your computer when it's ready.
  • Microsoft Word flaw took so long to fix that hackers used it to send fraud software to millions of computers
    A flaw in Microsoft Word took the tech giant so long to fix that hackers were able to use it to send fraud software to millions of computers, it has been revealed. The security flaw, officially known as CVE-2017-0199, could allow a hacker to seize control of a personal computer with little trace, and was fixed on April 11 in Microsoft's regular monthly security update - nine months after it was discovered.