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Reviews

Budgeting Software Options to Keep Linux Users From Seeing Red

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Linux
Reviews

These six budget-manager solutions for Linux offer a varied range of features and user interfaces. Some of these Linux money applications are good starting products for users with little or no experience with this category of software or online service. Other titles give you all of the tools to manage your household and your small business budgets.

Some of them are easy to set up and use. Others are more involved and can be frustrating if you are not familiar with money managing procedures.

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Kubuntu 19.04 Disco Dingo - Rather solid

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KDE
Reviews

Kubuntu 19.04 Disco Dingo is a pretty solid distribution. It does have some rough edges and some glaring problems, like the Samba connectivity, the hiccup or three with the smartphones, the language localization, and the Dolphin icon thingie. But then, it also brings in a whole basket of nice polishes, improvements and fresh, original features, which balance out the rough patches.

Best of all, the ugly stuff can be tweaked and sorted out, which begs the question why did the distro ship with these by default? It wouldn't take much to spit-polish everything to perfection. Anyway, Plasma remains pretty and smart and slick, the system is fast and responsive and stable, you get a good bundle of programs, and it's a genuine enjoyment using this distribution. Given the fact 19.04 is a test bed of sorts, much like Zesty was, the level of fun is surprisingly high. But it does make me happy. Once again, I'm cautiously hopeful and optimistic, but even more so than I was with Cosmic. 8.5/10, so better prep them thumb drives for an adventure.

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Ubuntu 19.04: The Disco Dingo arrives and will really make your IT dept. happy

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Canonical recently released Ubuntu 19.04, the latest version of its flagship GNOME-based Linux desktop. But if you're a desktop user, you might be feeling a little left out.

The big points of emphasis in this latest release are on Ubuntu as a tool for infrastructure development, server deployment, and the good old Internet of Things. For the server version of Ubuntu, the OS ships with all the latest cloud computing tools. In fact, that's already available in optimized builds on the major cloud services.

Elsewhere, the latest version of the venerable Ubuntu desktop packs quite a few additional, tempting reasons to upgrade for Linux gamers. Ubuntu 19.04 makes the leap to the Linux kernel 5.x series, for instance, which offers much improved graphics support.

Despite all the talk of developer tools and enterprise deployment stacks—Canonical has even taken to calling Ubuntu the "leading OS for cloud operations" lately—Ubuntu 19.04 is ultimately a worthwhile upgrade for all. After spending some time with it recently, we found some nice updates to the desktop, too. So no matter your Ubuntu use case, 19.04 seems to offer users a faster, more polished desktop than its predecessors.

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My First impression at PlaMo

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KDE
Reviews

I remember how my admiration for android turned into disappointment when I got into android development. The realisation, with every new release the patches are built on the broken pieces of android was disheartening. And the water crossed the line when the whole system started disrespecting the users privacy!
Then, I fine day (mid-January 2019) I came to know about Plasma Mobile. When every other attempt at creating an open source mobile platform on the horizon failed, KDE came along with Plasma Mobile. So how could have I resisted to not to using it!

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Elive Elevates Linux With Enlightenment

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Linux
Reviews

Elive has a very minimal set of requirements. Of course, the more your computer exceeds these minimum specs, the better the performance will be.

Here is what you need: 300 MHz CPU with 128 MB of RAM.

The integration of Enlightenment in the Elive Linux distro is different from all of the other distros running the Enlightenment desktop that I sampled. It is more refined.

Elive provides animated elements like backgrounds, icons, widgets and the terminal. It makes possible an animated desktop with 3D effects without an accelerated graphics card. If you take the time to fiddle with its design controls, you can finesse its desktop appearance and functionality like a painter creating a scene on a canvas.

Elive is something different. Give this distro a trial run. It offers a new approach to computing productivity.

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Entroware Ares Review: An Awesome And Affordable All-In-One Ubuntu Linux PC

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Linux
Reviews
Ubuntu

I don't normally spoil the verdict in the lead paragraph of my reviews, but Entroware -- a European PC builder specializing in Linux machines -- has convinced me there's room for an All-in-One in my life. I've been using the company's Ares AIO for a few months, and it'll be a shame to ship it back as it's become a useful and attractive desk companion. The Ares is sleek, affordable and even with a "lowly" Intel Core i3 CPU it goes toe-to-toe with my trusty Dell XPS 13 9370.

So let's talk about it.

All-in-one PCs like the Ares consolidate the traditional computer tower into the monitor housing, meaning all the components are tucked behind the display. Designs like this are well-suited for the majority of more casual Linux users, or those who can get their working and playing accomplished without a dedicated GPU (the Ares' only weakness). For people short on space or simply craving a streamlined work environment, this is an elegant solution.

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[Review] Void Linux, a Linux BSD Hybrid

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Reviews

Like Solus, Void Linux is written from scratch and does not depend on any other operating system. It is a rolling release. Unlike the majority of Linux distros, Void does not use systemd. Instead, it uses runit. Another thing that separates Void from the rest of Linux distros is the fact that they use LibreSSL instead of OpenSSL. Void also offers support for the musl C library. In fact, when you download a .iso file, you can choose between glibc and musl.

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Review: ROSA Fresh R11

Filed under
MDV
Reviews

Some of these issues are related to security and encryption, which doesn't appear to be a first-class citizen in ROSA. The other issues I encountered were likely to be Plasma-specific. I suspect there may be a setting in Plasma that alters the behaviour of, say, notifications. For new users, though, finding settings in Plasma can be akin to Hansel and Gretel looking for bread crumbs in the woods. For instance, I found an "Event Notification and Actions" menu by searching for "notifications" in the main menu. The window lists "event sources" such as "Archive Mail Agent", "KDE e-mail client" and "KMail" and for each source you are presented with a "State", "Title" and (sometimes) a "Description". I honestly don't understand most of the settings and gave up trying to tweak how notifications are displayed.

Conclusions

From what I have read about ROSA I gather the distro's aim is to be a user-friendly system for everyday users. If that is indeed what ROSA aims for then it largely achieves that goal. It does have some rough edges though; there is plenty of polish and a lot to like but it never took long for some cracks to appear.

For me, the main area where ROSA fell short is software management. Rpmdrake is awkward to use and the urpmi package manager is likely to be daunting for most new users. A software centre with some curated applications and/or support for package formats such as Snaps and Flatpaks would be a welcome improvement.

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GNOME 3.32 is awesome, but still needs improvements in key areas

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GNOME
Reviews

Several paper cuts in GNOME lead to an ultimately unpleasant experience for end users, new and experienced alike. On their own, these issues may seem minor, but together they can lead to confusion and even annoyance. The sheer number of extensions that exist to cater to non-advanced use cases and their popularity are a clear sign of shortcomings in vanilla GNOME.

I felt it was prudent to point out areas of improvement especially considering that most popular Linux distributions ship with GNOME as their default experience (with or without changes). Ubuntu, Fedora et al., are first Linux Desktop experiences to many millions and it should be the best it can be.

You may disagree with many of the issues pointed out above, or may have different solutions. But the common thing is we all want GNOME to be better. I urge you to initiate discussions on the GNOME Community and file bug reports. The stage is yours.

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Xubuntu 19.04 Disco Dingo - A dawn of a renaissance?

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Xubuntu 19.04 Disco Dingo is a fairly decent release for the bi-annual non-LTS testbed. It's stable enough, sort of mature bordering on boring, fast when it needs to be, pretty when you make it, and gives a relatively rounded overall experience. But then, it also falls short in quite a few areas.

These look more like nuggets of apathy than deliberate omissions - networking woes with Samba and Bluetooth, customization struggle, less than adequate battery life, some odd niggles here and there. It just feels like a tickbox exercise rather than a beautiful fruit of labor, passion and fun. It is somewhat better than Cosmic, but it's nowhere near as exciting as Xfce (or rather Xubuntu) used to be three years back. 7/10, and worth testing, but don't crank your adrenaline pump too high.

P.S. If you're in Australia and having trouble reading this review, please flip your monitor upside down.

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More in Tux Machines

Five reasons Chromebooks are better than Windows laptops

Today, Windows users hold off for as long as possible before "updating" their PCs. Chrome OS users, on the other hand, have their systems updated every six weeks without a hitch. And, I might add, these updates take a minute or two instead of an hour or two. Chrome OS is also more secure than Windows. WIndows security violations pop up every blessed month. Sure, Chrome OS has had security holes, but I can't think of one that's been significantly exploited. Want a nightmare? Try migrating from an old Windows PC to a new one. Even if you're jumping from Windows 10 to Windows 10, there are no easy ways to do it. If you have a Microsoft account, rather than a local account, you must manually move your local files from third-party programs such as Photoshop On Chrome OS, you log in to your new Chromebook and -- ta-da! -- you're back in business. No fuss, no muss. Read more

Programming: Joget Operator, Python, LibreOffice, GNOME and KDE

  • Automating Low Code App Deployment on Red Hat OpenShift with the Joget Operator

    This is a guest post by Julian Khoo, VP Product Development and Co-Founder at Joget Inc. Julian has almost 20 years of experience in the IT industry, specifically in enterprise software development. He has been involved in the development of various products and platforms in application development, workflow management, content management, collaboration and e-commerce.

  • Python Histogram Plotting: NumPy, Matplotlib, Pandas & Seaborn

    In this course, you’ll be equipped to make production-quality, presentation-ready Python histogram plots with a range of choices and features. If you have introductory to intermediate knowledge in Python and statistics, then you can use this article as a one-stop shop for building and plotting histograms in Python using libraries from its scientific stack, including NumPy, Matplotlib, Pandas, and Seaborn.

  • PyCon 2020 Conference Site is here!

    Our bold design includes the Roberto Clemente Bridge, also known as the Sixth Street Bridge, which spans the Allegheny River in downtown Pittsburgh. The Pittsburgh Steelmark, was originally created for United States Steel Corporation to promote the attributes of steel: yellow lightens your work; orange brightens your leisure; and blue widens your world. The PPG Building, is a complex in downtown Pittsburgh, consisting of six buildings within three city blocks and five and a half acres. Named for its anchor tenant, PPG Industries, who initiated the project for its headquarters, the buildings are all of matching glass design consisting of 19,750 pieces of glass. Also included in the design are a fun snake, terminal window, and hardware related items. [...] As with any sponsorship, the benefits go both ways. Organizations have many options for sponsorship packages, and they all benefit from exposure to an ever growing audience of Python programmers, from those just getting started to 20 year veterans and every walk of life in between. If you're hiring, the Job Fair puts your organization within reach of a few thousand dedicated people who came to PyCon looking to sharpen their skills.

  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #382 (Aug. 20, 2019)
  • Python Qt5 - the QTimer class.
  • [LibreOffice GSoC] Week 12 Report

    It was The last week of GSoC program. Raal was working on testing all the project and the generated files and I help him by solving some bugs or add anything.

  • Sajeer Ahamed: Review | GSoC 2019

    I've been working on GStreamer based project of Gnome Foundation. GStreamer is a pipeline-based multimedia framework that links together a wide variety of media processing systems to complete complex workflows. The framework is based on plugins that will provide various codec and other functionality. The plugins can be linked and arranged in a pipeline. And most of the plugins are written in C. Now the developers are in an attempt to convert them to Rust which is more robust and easily maintainable. My task is to be a part of this conversion and to help fix issues related to this.

  • KDE's Onboarding Sprint: Making it easier to setup a development environment

    Suse were generous enough to offer two spacious and fully equipped offices at their headquarters to host the KDE sprints. We owe a special thanks and a big KDE hug to the OpenSuse team and in particular Douglas DeMaio and Fabian Vogt for being incredible hosts.

  • Third month progress

    I am here presenting you with my final month GSoC project report. I will be providing the links to my work at the end of the section. Final month of the work period was much more hectic and tiring than the first couple of months. I had been busy more than I had anticipated. Nonetheless, I had to write code which I enjoyed writing : ) . In the first half of this work period, I was focused on completing the left-over QDBus communication from the phase 2, which I did successfully. But as when I thought my task was all over, I was faced with some regression in the code, which I utilised my rest half a month to fix it. [...] As I had said above in the intro, I was faced with some real difficulty during the second half of the work period. As soon as I finished up QDBus thing, a regression was caused (Which I should have noticed before, my bad), helper was no longer started by the main application. I spent rest of the days brain-storming the issue but due to shortage of time, could not fix it. I plan to try fixing it in the next few days before GSoC ends(26th August), if I successfully do that, I will update the status here as well .

Games: Steam Play/Proton, GNU/Linux on Xbox, and UnderMine

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    This week marks one year since Valve rolled out their Proton beta for Steam Play to allow Windows games to gracefully run on Linux via this Wine downstream catered for Steam Linux gaming. It's been crazy since then with all of Valve's continued work on open-source graphics drivers, adding the likes of FAudio and D9VK to Proton, continuing to fund DXVK development for faster Direct3D-over-Vulkan, and many other infrastructure improvements and more to allow more Windows games to run on Linux and to do so well and speedy.

  • Turn your Xbox console into a home PC with this guide

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  • Action-adventure roguelike UnderMine now available in Early Access

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GNU Scientific Library 2.6 released

Version 2.6 of the GNU Scientific Library (GSL) is now available. GSL provides a large collection of routines for numerical computing in C. This release introduces major performance improvements to common linear algebra matrix factorizations, as well as numerous new features and bug fixes. The full NEWS file entry is appended below. The file details for this release are: ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gsl/gsl-2.6.tar.gz ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gsl/gsl-2.6.tar.gz.sig The GSL project homepage is http://www.gnu.org/software/gsl/ GSL is free software distributed under the GNU General Public License. Thanks to everyone who reported bugs and contributed improvements. Patrick Alken Read more