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Reviews

Mageia 5 Graphics Woes With Intel Broadwell HD Graphics

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MDV
Reviews

For the most part my Linux benchmarking of Intel Broadwell systems currently in the form of the ThinkPad X1 Carbon and Intel Broadwell NUC have been going great. Major Linux distributions tested on this latest-generation Intel hardware have been going well, but the first major failure I've run into on Broadwell was when firing up Mageia 5 Beta 3.

In trying to decide what new Broadwell Linux tests to run, I decided on a large Linux distribution comparison using the Intel BOXNUC5I3RYH with Core i3 5010U processor and HD Graphics 5500. When booting up Mageia 5 Beta 3 x86_64 this morning was the first time I experienced show-stopping failure of Linux on this NUC, where as Ubuntu and Fedora were running fine.

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PCLinuxOS, A User Friendly Linux Distribution

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Linux
PCLOS
Reviews


PCLinuxOS Linux distribution

PCLinuxOS is one of the many distributions that exist in the world of Linux, but this caught my attention when I installed it on my computer. Let's take a look at PCLinuxOS, a distro that is user friendly.
 

Read at LinuxAndUbuntu

Bodhi Linux 3.0.0 Released – Detailed Review and Installation Instructions

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Linux
Reviews

Bodhi GNU/Linux is a Ubuntu-based distribution designed especially for Desktop computing and is best known for its elegant and lightweight nature. The Distribution philosophy is to provide a minimal base system that can be populated with the applications as per user’s choice. The base System only include those applications which are essentially required viz., ‘Etecad‘ File Manager, ‘Midori‘ web browser, ‘Terminology‘ terminal emulator, ePhoto and ePad. Apt or AppCenter can be used to download and install lightweight applications in one go.

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Sony SmartWatch 3 review: Android Wear can be remarkably unremarkable

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Android
Reviews

Android Wear feels like it's nowhere near its full potential and that the only thing holding it back is Google. You could say there's a kind of courage in doggedly sticking with simplicity, in refusing to rush out functionality that would give it feature parity with the as-yet unreleased Apple Watch. I'd love to know if the developers inside Google are standing on that principle or just waiting to see how people react to what Apple has made.

In the meantime, we have unassuming watches like Sony's SmartWatch 3. Even if you're part of the tiny sliver of users to whom it's designed to appeal, you have to admit that there's nothing really special about it.

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Korora Comes Bursting With Extras

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Red Hat
Reviews

The GNOME desktop is well integrated into the Korora distro. Korora 21 also is available with the Cinnamon, KDE and Xfce desktops. Korora developers did an awesome job tweaking the integration of each desktop into the distro's performance. You must download each ISO file separately. Like most full-service Linux distros, Korora no longer includes all of the desktop options in one humongous ISO.

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LibreOffice 4.4 review – Finally, it rocks

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LibO
Reviews

LibreOffice is the flagship office suite for Linux. It’s also quite popular with Windows users. As a free, open-source and cross-platform solution, LibreOffice allows people to enjoy the world of writing, spreadsheets, presentations and alike without having to spend hefty sums of money. The only problem till now was that it didn’t quite work as advertised. Microsoft Office support was, for the lack of a better word, lacking.

Version 4.4 is out, and it promises a great deal. A simplified interface, new looks, much improved proprietary file format support. Sounds exciting, and as someone who has lambasted LibreOffice for this very reason in the past, I felt compelled to give this new edition its due rightful try. On top of Plasma 5 no less. So let’s see.

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Video Phone Review and Wider Thoughts

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Reviews
Ubuntu

I recorded and posted a video with a detailed review of the bq Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu phone, complete with wider commentary on the scopes and convergence strategy and the likelihood of success.

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Review: Nvidia's Android-powered Shield tablet is actually great for gaming

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Reviews

Nvidia followed that device up this past summer with what it calls the "Shield Tablet," an 8-inch device built to be a solid tablet, but with a clear focus on gaming. I've had one here for the last week, kicking the tires. And, let me tell you, it makes both an incredible tablet and an astoundingly good game console.

Let's get the "tablet-y" stuff out of the way first.

The Shield Tablet has an 8-inch, 1920x1200 display, which looks stupidly good and sports relatively big (for a tablet) stereo speakers on the front. Inside, it has 2 gigs of RAM, a beefy CPU, and it runs the latest and greatest version of Android (5.0,

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Softpedia's Screenshot Tours

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Reviews
  • Bodhi Linux 3.0.0 Officially Released, Uses the Numix Icons - Screenshot Tour

    Softpedia was the first to announce today, ahead of the official announcement, that the final release of the highly anticipated Bodhi Linux 3.0.0 computer operating system is available for download. Exactly 12 hours after our blog post, Jeff Hoogland officially announced the immediate availability of Bodhi Linux 3.0.0 for PCs and Chromebooks.

  • Bridge Linux LXDE 2015.02 Screenshot Tour

    The last screenshot tour blog post in the Bridge Linux 2015.02 series is for the LXDE (Lightweight X11 Desktop Environment) edition, which appears to be the most resource friendly of all Bridge Linux flavors.

  • Frugalware Linux 2.0 Officially Released with MATE 1.8.1

    The Frugalware Developer Team proudly announced the immediate availability for download of the Frugalware Linux 2.0 computer operating system, a general purpose and independent GNU/Linux distribution that has been created from the ground up for people who are not afraid of text mode.

MakuluLinux 2.0 Cinnamon

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Reviews

I think it is easy to get excited about Makulu as the distribution offers a lot. Users are given a modern, feature rich desktop (Cinnamon), a lot of useful software, including VLC, the WPS suite, a rich settings panel and easy to use backup utility. Multimedia is well supported and the operating system (when run on a physical machine) performed well. Plus users have access to a huge supply of software in the Debian repositories. I was a little surprised at some of the choices offered. For example, offering us WPS over LibreOffice is an unusual choice for an open source operating system. It's not a bad choice necessarily, just uncommon. Likewise, the focus on gaming (providing Steam and PlayOnLinux) is an interesting choice. The theme, with its focus on rich, 3-D icons, is also strange, but a welcome breath of fresh air when compared against the stark utility of GNOME or the flat, washed out look of recent KDE releases.

I suppose what really stands out about Makulu is it is an open source operating system that does not shy away from including proprietary applications when the developers feel those are the right tools for the job. It is a philosophy that may disappoint proponents of free software, but I have to admit it seems a practical path, one which is likely to attract people transitioning from Windows to Linux.

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Linux on Servers

Debian, Devuan, and Ubuntu

  • My Free Software Activities in April 2016
    I handled a new LTS sponsor that wanted to see wheezy keep supporting armel and armhf. This was not part of our initial plans (set during last Debconf) and I thus mailed all teams that were impacted if we were to collectively decide that it was OK to support those architectures. While I was hoping to get a clear answer rather quickly, it turns out that we never managed to get an answer to the question from all parties. Instead the discussion drifted on the more general topic of how we handle sponsorship/funding in the LTS project.
  • Initial Planning For Ubuntu 16.10 Today At UOS
    Beyond the announcement that Ubuntu 16.10 won't ship with Mir and Unity 8 by default, many other items were discussed for the Ubuntu 16.10 release due out in October.
  • Ubuntu 16.10 Isn't Going To Use Mir / Unity 8 By Default
    Well, another setback for Unity 8 and Mir. Kicking off the Ubuntu Online Summit for Ubuntu 16.10, it's been confirmed that the Unity 8 desktop and Mir display server will not be the default for the desktop spin. Similar to the current situation with existing Ubuntu releases, Unity 8 and Mir will be available as an opt-in feature for users wanting to upgrade their desktop, but Unity 7 and the faithful X.Org Server is planned to be the default for Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak.
  • Devuan Beta Release
    After two years in development, a beta release of the Devuan distro has made it into the world (Devuan is a registered trademark of the Dyne.org foundation). Devuan is a very Debian-ish distro. In fact, it basically is Debian, with one notable absence. Devuan doesn't use systemd. In fact, that's its main claim to fame. Devuan was created to offer an alternative to Debian fans who were alienated by the controversial switch to systemd.

Leftovers: OSS

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