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Reviews

A quick review of Knoppix 5.1, part 2

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Linux
Reviews

It's impossible to write a decent review of any complex distribution, let alone Knoppix. These few posts are a quick pass at features that caught my eye while I had Knoppix up and running. This time I'm going to look at two IDEs, Eclipse and MonoDevelop.

Mandriva Flash 2007: the unexpected gift

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MDV
Reviews

With the current technologies, a 2 GB USB stick is not expensive. This is why Mandriva thought of releasing Mandriva Flash on December 7, and they have chosen a high-quality 2 GB USB stick as a medium for it. I have recently received a complimentary Mandriva Flash for reviewing. I have used it for a few days, and here's what my experiences were.

A quick review of Knoppix 5.1

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Reviews

Knoppix 5.1.0 was released around late December 2006. Then version 5.1.1 was released in early January 2007, apparently to correct some rather serious flaws. There were stability issues as well. Knoppix 5.1.1 fixed that flaw and more, as well as making the overall 5.1 release a lot more stable. Knoppix 5.1.1 is the release to burn and boot.

Book Review: Live Linux CDs

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Reviews

I can still remember the wow factor when first seeing a copy of Knoppix booting up on a Windows machine. These days Knoppix is no longer alone, there are plenty of other Linux live CDs available. For those who've ever wondered how it all works or have entertained ideas of creating their own live CDs then Christopher Negus has put together a book that opens the lid on the arcane secrets involved.

Book Review: Designing and Implementing Linux Firewalls and QoS using netfilter, iproute2, NAT, and L7-filter

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Reviews

As is reminiscent of many of the books written by authors for Packt Publishing, the first chapter begins with descriptions and re-introductions to many of the basic networking concepts. These include the OSI model, subnetting, supernetting, and a brief overview of the routing protocols. Chapter 2 discusses the need for network security and how it applies to each of the layers of the OSI model.

Ubuntu Linux 6.06 Running on a Toshiba Satellite P20-801

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Reviews
Ubuntu

From the offset I feel it necessary to say that this Toshiba notebook as I have found it is made for Ubuntu 6.06. The installation was distressingly simple and hassle free. The installation took just over 45 minutes with 1GB.

Xubuntu offers appealing desktop alternative

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Sometime earlier this year my notebook, a low-end IBM R50e, got slow. It used to be reasonably zippy and Ubuntu worked extremely well on it. Then it just became downright sluggish and applications would often take ages to open. But having gone through the pain, and failure, of trying to install Ubuntu Edgy, I decided to look for an alternative.

Review: InnoTek’s VirtualBox

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Reviews

Almost a month ago InnoTek, the co-developer of VirtualPC, released their Virtual Machine as Open Source. The software was formerly not targetted at desktop users, but that changed when it was released under the GPL. This review tries to shed some light on the question if VirtualBox can get some market share between Vmware and Qemu.

Nokia N800 Internet Tablet

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Reviews

Nokia takes a second shot at building an Internet Tablet you'll actually want to use. Ars takes the new and improved N800 out for a spin, checking out the browser, its secret FM radio, and VNC (among other things). How does it stack up against its predecessor?

Ubuntu 7.10 Alpha 3 [Feisty herd 3] review and screenshots

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Reviews

Downloading the iso was a little difficult to find the right download links. But then I checked out distrowatch who had a link to the iso directly. Ten hours later, it was done. I didn’t see anything different after booting from the cd.

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