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Reviews

Huawei’s first Android Wear watch is a beautiful yet basic timepiece

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Android
Reviews

Huawei isn't exactly the first company that comes to mind when you think of stylish connected devices. The Chinese manufacturer has delved into wearables with its TalkBand series, but those were slow to come to the US and their fitness tracker-meets-Bluetooth-headset capabilities were peculiar. Now Huawei wants to test the waters of Google's wearable OS with its new smartwatch, simply dubbed the Huawei Watch, and it's a solid first attempt at Android Wear.

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GNOME 3.18 lands with Google Drive, integrated Linux firmware updates, new apps

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GNOME
Reviews

GNOME 3.18 includes a variety of other improvements. It now supports automatic brightness control, using a light sensor on your laptop to adjust the backlight to save battery life. Multi-touch gestures aren’t just for touch screens anymore—they can be used on a laptop touchpad under the new Wayland graphical server. Selecting, copying, cutting, and otherwise editing text with a touch screen is much improved. Scrolling has been improved, and you can now activate automatic scrolling by right-clicking a scrollbar.

Want to try it yourself? GNOME 3.18 will soon arrive as part of Fedora 23, currently in beta, but scheduled to be released on October 27. Download the Fedora Workstation 23 beta image to try it today.

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Hands on with Google's Nexus 5X, 6P Android Marshmallow mobes

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Android
Reviews

Google has updated its Nexus smartphone range with two new handsets powered by the latest build of Android, codenamed Marshmallow.

"Nexus is for Android because we've designed it," Google's newish CEO Sundar Pichai told the press at Tuesday's launch in San Francisco, meaning that the new phones have been designed to squeeze the most out of Android 6.0 aka Marshmallow. Hopefully for Google that will have customers asking it for s'more (sorry).

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Also: Pixel C: Google has a crack at the fondleslab-with-keyboard game

ScudCloud, Slack Client For Linux Install In Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Fedora

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Linux
Reviews
Ubuntu
HowTos


ScudCloud, Slack Client For Linux Install In Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Fedora

Slack has completely changed the way that we used to communicate to one and other. Slack allows to join multiple teams and talk to them effectively without any distraction. But Slack can be more handy, if you've Slack client in your Linux (No more web app), but slack does not have any official client for Linux. But thanks to ScudCloud!

Read At LinuxAndUbuntu

Review: Silent Circle Blackphone 2 Sub Title: Privacy Please

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Android
Reviews

The Blackphone 2, the second device from the Swiss company Silent Circle, is unique. It promises a fully private experience, with advanced security features, deep permissions management, and encrypted voice, text, and video chat built in. The phone, which runs a heavily modified version of Android, lets you fiddle with the most granular permissions settings of all your apps, giving you a level of privacy control that far exceeds that of regular Android phones. And when you make a call, send a text, or fire up a videoconference, your communications travel encrypted across Silent Circle’s private cloud VPN, better protecting you from spies.

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ASUS ZenWatch 2 review

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Android
Reviews

If you stop and think about it, we've actually been in need of a decent starter watch for Android Wear. Something that doesn't cost $300 (or more). Something that gets you the basic Android smartwatch experience without breaking the bank.

The LG G Watch used to be that watch. More display on your wrist than watch-looking watch, it can be had for around $100 these days. But it doesn't look like much. That's where the ASUS ZenWatch 2 definitely trumps it. And it does so for a paltry sum.

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VectorLinux Light Has That Old-School Linux Feeling

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Reviews

VectorLinux has no live session releases to let users try it out. Not having a live session is a severe disservice. It is also a big inconvenience in determining if the OS works on your gear. This illustrates everything that is wrong with VectorLinux's distribution approach. It reinforces everything that detractors say about Linux being hard to install and confusing to set up.

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Huawei Watch Review, the classiest Android Wear smartwatch available right now

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Android
Reviews

The stainless steel body of the Huawei Watch screams the utmost premium quality, adding a touch of class to your wrist, all the while fooling everyone into believing that you’re wearing a traditional watch. Little do they know that you’re wearing a computer on your wrist. This sought after feature has an obvious draw to a particular audience that wishes to practice a bit of form over function.

I did not miss Qi charging and I did not miss having a built in ambient light sensor. The Huawei Watch is most likely the best in class that Android Wear has to offer right now, even though there are a few aspects of the watch that might not be suitable for everyone. If you don’t mind the lack of an ambient light sensor and you don’t mind the need for a propriety charger, the elegance of the Huawei Watch makes this smartwatch a must have for anyone looking to purchase a premium smartwatch right now.

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Blackphone 2 Review: A Slick But Very Expensive Prophylactic For Your Android Security Woes

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Android
Reviews
Security

The Blackphone is a fine device. It’s attractive, it’s fast. There’s a wonderful array of easy-to-use security settings, surpassing anything on the market, whilst much of the good work is done by the Silent Circle crew patching vulnerabilities and issuing updates. For dilettantes of the privacy and security spheres, or anyone who wants good protection from digital threats with little fuss, the Blackphone 2 is an ideal choice.

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Leftovers: Reviews/Screenshots

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Reviews
  • Live Voyager X2 - Screencast and Screenshots
  • Apricity OS 09.2015 Beta Screenshot Tour
  • Exploring the magic of Mageia 5

    Mageia, a community distribution forked from the now-discontinued Mandriva project, released Mageia 5 a few weeks ago. The new version of Mageia ships with updated software packages and UEFI support. (Secure Boot is not supported at this time.) The development team provided a good deal of documentation with the new version, supplying release notes, a summarizing release announcement and errata to guide us through potential problems. The Mageia distribution is available in many different builds and editions. There are plain installation discs, live discs (offered in GNOME and KDE editions) and discs for network installations. Each of the download options is available in 32-bit and 64-bit x86 builds.

  • A review of the Mageia 5 Linux distro
  • Ubuntu MATE 15.10 Beta 2 Screenshot Tour - A Modern OS for Conservative Users

    The stable version of Ubuntu MATE Wily Werewolf (15.10) is almost here and we just received the final Beta. We now take a closer look at this Ubuntu flavor and see what's been happening in the past few months.

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More in Tux Machines

Singapore IT bosses turn to open source

In order to successfully compete in the age of the customer and continue to deliver world-class operational capabilities, senior IT decision makers from Singapore plan to focus on three IT and business priorities in the next 12 months. These include reducing cost and improving operational efficiency (78%); improving their organization’s ability to innovate (46%); and improving customer experience (46%). These three priorities have been reflected in respondents’ strategic IT initiatives in the next 12 months to transform both internal and customer facing technologies. Three-fourths (76%) identified integration of back-end systems-of-record with customer-facing mobile and web systems-of-engagement as a high or critical priority. More than half (56%) identified modernization of key legacy applications as a high or critical priority. Read more

Radisys Contributes Its LTE RAN Software to M-CORD

Linux and Linux Foundation

  • Linux 4.10 Released as First New Kernel of 2017
    After a one week delay, Linus Torvalds released the first new Linux kernel of 2017 on Feb. 19, with the debut of Linux 4.10. The Linux 4.9 kernel (aka 'Roaring Lionus'' was released back on Dec. 11. There was some talk in 2016 that seemed to indicate that Linux 4.10 would in fact be re-numbered as Linux 5.0 but that didn't end up happening. "On the whole, 4.10 didn't end up as small as it initially looked," Torvalds wrote in his release announcement. "After the huge release that was 4.9, I expected things to be pretty quiet, but it ended up very much a fairly average release by modern kernel standards." "So we have about 13,000 commits (not counting merges- that would be another 1200+ commits if you count those)," Torvalds added.
  • The Companies That Support Linux and Open Source: Mender.io
    IoT is largely transitioning from hype to implementation with the growth of smart and connected devices spanning across all industries including building automation, energy, healthcare and manufacturing. The automotive industry has given some of the most tangible examples of both the promise and risk of IoT, with Tesla’s ability to deploy over-the-air software updates a prime example of forward-thinking efficiency. On the other side, the Jeep Cherokee hack in July 2015 displayed the urgent need for security to be a top priority for embedded devices as several security lapses made it vulnerable and gave hackers the ability to remotely control the vehicle. One of the security lapses included the firmware update of the head unit (V850) not having the proper authenticity checks.
  • Open Source Networking: Disruptive Innovation Ready for Prime Time
    Innovations are much more interesting than inventions. The “laser” is a classic invention and “FedEx” is a classic innovation. Successful innovation disrupts entire industries and ecosystems as we’ve seen with Uber, AirBnB, and Amazon to name just a few. The entire global telecommunication industry is at the dawn of a new era of innovation. Innovations should be the rising tide in which everybody wins except what’s referred to as “laggards.” Who are the laggards going to be in this new era of open communications? You don’t want to be one. [...] It’s clear from this presentation that The Linux Foundation and its Open Source Networking and Orchestration portfolio of projects is driving real innovation in the networking ecosystem. Successful and impactful innovations take time as the disruptive forces ripple throughout the ecosystem. The Linux Foundation is taking on the complex task of coordinating multiple open source initiatives with the goal to eliminate barriers to adoption. Providing end-to-end testing and harmonization will reduce many deployment barriers and accelerate the time required for production deployments. Those interested in the future of open source networking should attend ONS 2017. No one wants to be a “laggard.”

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