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Reviews

Makulu's LinDoz Is a Smooth Windows-Cinnamon Blend

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Reviews

That technical issue aside, The MakuluLinux line is one of my favorites. Unlike typical distros, Makulu strays from some of the mainstream primary applications.

It also has a set of the most commonly used software preinstalled regardless of the desktop flavor selected. For example, it uses the WPS office suite.

If you fancy the Cinnamon desktop, you will feel right at home with MakuluLinux. If you cut your computing teeth on Microsoft Windows, you will be particularly enamored with the LinDoz Edition.

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An Everyday Linux User Review Of Peppermint OS 7 - Nice Ice Baby

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Linux
Reviews

I like to watch videos by the Linux Help Guy who has changed his Youtube channel to English Bob. He has always been an advocate for 2 distributions and they are Peppermint OS and Manjaro.

I have to say he is going to be over the moon when he tries this out for the first time.

It has been such an easy experience thus far and the theming is excellent. There isn't really all that much to review software wise but the way Peppermint integrates web applications with desktop applications is really nice.

I highly recommend this. One of the best distributions that I have reviewed recently.

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Fedora 24 Pushes Linux Boundaries

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Red Hat
Reviews

Fedora Linux is the community version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux, or RHEL. Fedora 24 is comprised of a set of base packages that form the foundation of three distinct editions: Fedora 24 Cloud, Fedora 24 Server and Fedora 24 Workstation.

Delayed four times during its development cycle, Fedora 24 includes glibc 2.23 for better performance, and improvements to POSIX compliance and GNU Compiler Collection 6. All base packages have been rebuilt with GCC 6, providing better code optimization across all Fedora 24 editions, and improving the overall stability of each addition.

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An Everyday Linux User Review Of PCLinuxOS 2016 MATE

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Linux
Reviews

PCLinuxOS was the first Linux distribution that really made Linux useable for the masses and then Ubuntu came along and kind of stole the show.

It has to be said though that this is a really nice distribution for the Everyday Linux User and I can happily recommend using it as I did the last time I reviewed PCLinuxOS.

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Linux recommendations for a novice: Trying out Linux Mint, Manjaro, and PCLinuxOS

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Reviews

My recommendation was a choice of three different distributions: Linux Mint MATE, Manjaro Xfce, or PCLinuxOS MATE. As I am a firm believer in "write about what you do, and do what you write about" (as opposed to "regurgitate press releases and try to sound important"), I went home and got out my own Samsung N150 Plus and loaded all three of those distributions on it.

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Fedora 24 Workstation Review: All Work and Very Little Play

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Red Hat
Reviews

Fedora 24 brings with it a number of technical improvements, software upgrades, and under the hood. It’s clear that the Fedora developers have been working closely with upstream sources to tightly integrate advances in everything from the kernel to GNOME, Systemd, NetworkManager, and GCC6 which have all been forged into a powerful core. However, that’s about where it ends.

When it comes to a being a full fledged desktop distribution, Fedora 24 falls a bit short, and that’s mostly due to the Fedora project’s limited repositories.

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Also: Fedora 24 Released With New Features, Download ISO Files Here

Review of Fedora 24

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Red Hat
Reviews

We run out of time to have a play around and do any kind of serious testing of the Boxes application. But we have been reading about it and understand it is a virtual machine package, designed to run sandboxed virtual machines. Yes, similar to Oracle VM VirtualBox. We intend to look more into the Boxes feature a little later down the track. So we will bring you more information on it soon.

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Antergos Linux One Of Best Arch Based Distros

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Linux
Reviews

One of the most difficult tasks for Linux newbies is to install Arch Linux. Unlike most of other Linux distributions, Arch Linux does not have graphical installer. It's completely CLI. Users have always been interested to use Arch based distros and luckily there are many. Antergos Linux is one the best, beautiful and sleek Arch based distros available.

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Android apps on Chromebook review: Is it ready for mainstream use?

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Android
Reviews

Is Android on Chromebook ready for mainstream use? Not quite yet. But, I can see it from where it is now. I've long thought that Chromebooks could replace Windows PCs. Now, with Android apps, I can see people choosing $200 Chromebooks over $400 Windows 10 laptops. Windows' last stronghold, the desktop, finally has some real competition.

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ReactOS 0.4.1 review - Cold fusion

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OS
Reviews

Duke Nukem, Half-Life 3, ReactOS. What do they all have in common? An extremely long development time. In this article, we will focus on the last, a project that started in 1996 as an attempt to provide a free, Windows-compatible operating system to the masses.

Fast forward 20 years, ReactOS is a living, breathing entity, having recently reached a semi-mature 0.4.1 release. Lots of stuff has been happening under the hood, enough to warrant some real-life testing. Anyhow, here be Dedoimedo's first stab at this interesting little system.

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More in Tux Machines

GNU: The GNU C Library 2.28 and Guix on Android

  • Glibc 2.28 Upstream Will Build/Run Cleanly On GNU Hurd
    While Linux distributions are still migrating to Glibc 2.27, in the two months since the release changes have continued building up for what will eventually become the GNU C Library 2.28. The Glibc 2.28 work queued thus far isn't nearly as exciting as all the performance optimizations and more introduced with Glibc 2.27, but it's a start. Most notable at this point for Glibc 2.28 is that it will now build and run cleanly on GNU/Hurd without requiring any out-of-tree patches. There has been a ton of Hurd-related commits to Glibc over the past month.
  • Guix on Android!
    Last year I thought to myself: since my phone is just a computer running an operating system called Android (or Replicant!), and that Android is based on a Linux kernel, it's just another foreign distribution I could install GNU Guix on, right? It turned out it was absolutely the case. Today I was reminded on IRC of my attempt last year at installing GNU Guix on my phone. Hence this blog post. I'll try to give you all the knowledge and commands required to install it on your own Android device.
  • GNU Guix Wrangled To Run On Android
    The GNU Guix transactional package manager can be made to run on Android smartphones/tablets, but not without lots of hoops to jump through first.

Node.js 10.9 and npm milestone

  • Open Source Node.js Hits v10, with Better Security, Performance, More
    Speaking of which, the brand-new Node.js 10.0 is expected to soon support npm version 6 (currently Node.js ships with npm 5.7.x). The company npm Inc., which maintains the npm software package management application, today announced that major update, called npm@6. The npm company said its JavaScript software installer tool includes new security features for developers working with open source code.
  • Announcing npm@6
    In coordination with today’s announcement of Node.js v10, we’re excited to announce npm@6. This major update to npm includes powerful new security features for every developer who works with open source code. Read on to understand why this matters.

Openwashing: Sony, Scality and Ericsson

Voyage/Open Autonomous Safety (OAS) Now on GitHub

  • Voyage open-sources autonomous driving safety practices
    Dubbed Open Autonomous Safety, the initiative aims to help autonomous driving startups implement better safety-testing practices. Companies looking to access the documents, safety procedures and test code can do so via a GitHub repository.
  • Open-Sourcing Our Approach to Autonomous Safety
    Without a driver to help identify and mitigate failures, autonomous vehicle systems need incredibly robust safety requirements and an equally comprehensive and well-defined process for analyzing risks and assessing capabilities. Voyage models its safety approach after the ISO 26262 standard for automotive safety, taking the best practices from the automotive industry and applying them to autonomous technology. The automotive industry continues to reach for new levels of safety in manufacturing vehicles, and we are inspired by that approach.
  • Startup Voyage Wants to Open Source Self-Driving Car Safety
    Under what the company calls its Open Autonomous Safety initiative, Voyage is publishing information on its safety procedures, materials, and test code in a series of releases. The goal is to create an open-source library of safety procedures that multiple companies can use as a standard, a Voyage blog post said.
  • This startup’s CEO wants to open-source self-driving car safety testing
    The initial release, which Voyage calls Open Autonomous Safety (OAS), will take the form of a GitHub repository containing documents and code. The functional safety requirements are Voyage's interpretation of the ISO 26262 standard for automotive safety, updated for autonomous vehicles. "This is our internal driving test for any particular software build," says Cameron. "It lets us evaluate our designs and look for the different ways they can fail in the real world."