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Reviews

How Handy HandyLinux Is?

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Reviews

HandyLinux 1.5 is a nice looking system. It reacts quickly to your actions, snappy and fast. It is more or less easy on resources: only about 250 Mb of memory when idle, though you might expect even less from the Debian+Xfce combination.

However, there are still some things for developers to look at. French roots are visible, menu can be extended for easier use, packages are missing or broken. That's not something you would expect from a distribution that claims to be "Powered by Debian".

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Review: KaOS 2014.04

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Reviews

This distribution caught my eye from a DistroWatch review. That review concludes that it isn't clear exactly what the goal of this distribution is. Looking at the website more, I can't say that it's any clearer to me either. All I can glean is that this distribution aims to please more experienced users with a rolling-release model, maintain a small base of packages so that those will be polished before use, and target newer computers by using KDE and only 64-bit releases. I'll have to try this distribution out to see if there is any more information regarding the target audience of this distribution. I tried KaOS on a live USB made with MultiSystem. Follow the jump to see what it's like.

After going past the boot menu, I was greeted by a scrolling wall of text. This gave way reasonably quickly to the KDE splash, which is customized for KaOS. This then gave way to the desktop. The first thing that I saw was a very nice simple welcome screen, which gave information about live session passwords, installed packages, and other things. For a live session, this is the kind of information I like seeing, and I wish most other distributions (aside from a few that do) would do that.

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New Screenshots

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Reviews

Mint 17: The best Linux desktop to date

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GNU
Linux
Reviews

Put it all together and you have a very fast, very secure, and very smooth and easy to use desktop. While other operating systems lately seem to be determined to make things harder for users—and no, I'm not just talking about Microsoft and Windows—Mint's developers keep improving an already superb desktop experiences.

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New Screenshots

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Leftovers: Screenshots

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Reviews

Quick Look: Unity for Arch

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Development
News
OSS
Reviews
Ubuntu
HowTos

A precursory glance at the above screenshot might give the impression that this is yet another Ubuntu Linux review. However, a closer look at the logo in the bottom left corner reveals that nothing could be farther from the truth. Today we’ll be taking a quick look at the Unity desktop environment on Arch Linux.

Quick Look: Linux Mint 17 Cinnamon

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Reviews

There’s quite a bit to look forward to in Linux Mint 17 Cinnamon. Changes in this release include Update Manager and Driver Manager improvements, Login Screen enhancements, a new Language Settings tool, tweaks to the Software Sources menu, and a redesigned Welcome Screen, among other things.

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Hands On: Linux Mint 17 Release Candidate

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Reviews

The Release Candidate for Linux Mint 17 (Qiana) was released a few days ago. A lot of people have been looking forward to this release, and I am one of them. So I have downloaded both the Cinnamon and MATE versions, and installed them on several of my laptops and netbooks. As is pretty much always the case with Mint, everything went very smoothly, and it all appears to work very well.

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The Slowmo Linux Desktop

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GNU
Linux
Reviews

Flickr user José put together this good-looking Linux Mint desktop. It features media controls and a simple launcher at the bottom. Here’s how he set it all up.

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More in Tux Machines

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Security Leftovers

  • DNS server attacks begin using BIND software flaw
    Attackers have started exploiting a flaw in the most widely used software for the DNS (Domain Name System), which translates domain names into IP addresses. Last week, a patch was issued for the denial-of-service flaw, which affects all versions of BIND 9, open-source software originally developed by the University of California at Berkeley in the 1980s.
  • Researchers Create First Firmware Worm That Attacks Macs
    The common wisdom when it comes to PCs and Apple computers is that the latter are much more secure. Particularly when it comes to firmware, people have assumed that Apple systems are locked down in ways that PCs aren’t. It turns out this isn’t true. Two researchers have found that several known vulnerabilities affecting the firmware of all the top PC makers can also hit the firmware of MACs. What’s more, the researchers have designed a proof-of-concept worm for the first time that would allow a firmware attack to spread automatically from MacBook to MacBook, without the need for them to be networked.

Brocade CEO: Transition To Open Source Will Be Difficult For Cisco

Communications CEO Lloyd Carney said traditional vendors like Cisco will have a tough time adapting to a more software-defined, open source space. That's because traditional vendors like Cisco's revenue streams are tied to closed architectures, Carney said. Read more