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Reviews

CompuLab's Fitlet Is A Very Tiny, Fanless, Linux PC With AMD A10 Micro

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GNU
Linux
Hardware
Reviews

CompuLab, the manufacturer of the Fitlet based in Israel, describes their new line-up as, "a fanless mini PC with high performance, excellent graphics, up to 4 LAN ports and 5 year warranty. filtet is among the smallest PCs available and packs more features than any similar PC...For those familiar with the Intel® NUC – fitlet is somewhat similar. Just much smaller, fanless, with more features, and more powerful than NUCs in its price range."

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A weekend spent cheating on Ubuntu with Fedora 22

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Red Hat
Reviews

Fedora is OK . It does all the things that you can do with the other distros no less and no more. One should never consider switching from say Centos to Fedora, but if you insist you can get all the three versions of Fedora here. I can promise you though, that the whole experience can be kind of underwhelming.

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Underrated Android: Asus ZenFone 2 An Impressive Unlocked Flagship Device At Budget Pricing

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Android
Reviews

The subsidized smartphone market is sort of a racket. Well, Okay, it’s not sort of a racket. It’s definitely a racket. Every time your phone starts feeling old or worn out, or if you’re jonesing for the latest superphone bling, most mainstream consumers have to consider dealing with their carrier’s “new every two” plan or some other scheme to lock you into a long term contract. So you’re stuck with potentially lousy coverage if you move or travel a lot to a new area, or if that carrier isn’t keeping up with competitive rates. It’s a catch-22 of course. How else are carriers going to offer reasonable prices on the latest premium smartphones, but to rope you in and make up the profit on service fees?

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Fedora 22 review - Fiascoed

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Red Hat
Reviews

And so, without any application testing, any customization, desktop effects, resource usage testing, and some other bits and pieces, we must bring the Fedora Twenty-Two KDE review to a halt. Because the distro is dead, and it can't cope with some simple updates and installs. Really a shame. It reminds me that Fedora is a testbed. But it used to be quite stable recently, and now, we're back in 2010.

I really am disappointed. I wish I had some better news for you, but this release simply doesn't cut it. It's riddled with bugs, even when it works, and then it stops working. Slow, laggy, average hardware compatibility including Nvidia problems, a less than ideal presentation layer, all in all, a rushed edition with no soul or passion. You can't fake those. Grade we must, and so Fedora 22 gets a very feeble 2/10. See you around.

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Also: A Quick Look At Fedora 22 “XFCE” | What’s New

Further Adventures in Calculate Linux

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Reviews

I've been experimenting in Calculate Linux lately because it offered a modern KDE without systemd or selinux installed by default, and perhaps a bit because of my nostalgia for Gentoo. Things got off to a rocky start, but after ironing out most of wrinkles and I'm finding myself right at home. I think you could too.

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Cinnamon 2.6 – a Linux desktop for Windows XP refugees

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Reviews

Cinnamon is best known as one of the two default desktops for Linux Mint, which is fast approaching its next major update. Mint 17.2 will include the brand new Cinnamon 2.6, just released, when delivered later this year.

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Dell Venue 10 7000 review: This isn't your average Android tablet

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Android
Reviews

As a Guy Who Reviews Android Devices™, I've been faced with a strange sort of conundrum lately: When someone asks me to recommend a 10-in. Android tablet, I haven't had a good answer.

Sure, there are plenty of options out there. But it's been quite a while since there's been one that's stood out for being really great. Most of the contenders come with at least one serious caveat, be it chintzy construction, less-than-perfect performance, or software that makes you want to strike yourself with the nearest blunt object. And suffice it to say, those kinds of things take significant tolls on what a device is like to use.

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Nvidia Shield Review: The Best Way To Experience Android TV

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Android
Reviews

Nvidia has built two Shield devices in the past, but their latest hardware to carry the brand differs a little since it’s the first non-portable in the lineup.

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First impressions of Chromixium OS 1.0

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Google
Reviews

My point is that people who are likely to enjoy Chromebooks and use their computers almost solely for accessing the web will probably find Chromixium quite useful. However, while it is technically possible to access more features and off-line software through Chromixium's application menu, the process is slow and awkward when compared with other desktop Linux distributions. Granted, Chromixium is still in its early stages, it just hit version 1.0, so the standalone features will probably improve in time. For now, I think Chromixium offers an interesting web-focused environment with the fallback option of using locally installed applications. The implementation has some rough edges at the moment, but I suspect it will get better in future releases.

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Linux Mint 17.1: Simplicity at Its Best

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Reviews

Linux Mint is a special kind of Linux distribution—one that has gone a very long way to hold true to the form, function, and spirit that has guided Linux for a very long time. While other distributions march into the shiny, touch-friendly world that is the future, Mint remains grounded in what has worked for decades. With just the slightest of tweaks, Mint has gone boldly into that good night while keeping a foot deeply planted in the familiar.

With it’s latest release, 17.1 “Rebecca”, Linux Mint retains all of that which is familiar and beloved by its long time followers and adds enough polish to help attract new users.

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Unimpressed with Ubuntu 16.10? Yakkety Yak... don't talk back

Before I dive into what's new in Ubuntu 16.10, called Yakkety Yak, let's just get this sentence out of the way: Ubuntu 16.10 will not feature Unity 8 or the new Mir display server. I believe that's the seventh time I've written that since Unity 8 was announced and here we are on the second beta for 16.10. Maybe that's why they named it Unity 8. Whatever the case, Unity 8 is available for testing if you'd like to try it. So far I haven't managed to get it working on any of the hardware I use, which goes a long way to explaining why it's not part of Ubuntu proper yet. Read more

Reiser4 Implements Mirror & Failover Support

Edward Shishkin, one of the last remaining Reiser4 developers and the one who has been leading this out-of-tree file-system the past few years, has implemented logical volumes support with support for mirrors (in effect, RAID 0) and failover support at the file-system level. Shishkin quietly announced on Sunday, "Reiser4 will support logical (compound) volumes. For now we have implemented the simplest ones - mirrors. As a supplement to existing checksums it will provide a failover - an important feature, which will reduce number of cases when your volume needs to be repaired by fsck." Read more

Exactly What Is OpenStack? Red Hat's Rich Bowen Explains

You've probably heard of OpenStack. It's in the tech news a lot, and it's an important open source project. But what exactly is it, and what is it for? Rich Bowen of Red Hat provided a high-level view of OpenStack as a software project, an open source foundation, and a community of organizations in his talk at LinuxCon North America. OpenStack is a software stack that went from small to industry darling at warp speed. It has three major components: The compute service runs the virtual machines (VMs), and it has a networking service and a storage service, plus a dashboard to run everything. OpenStack is only six years old, and was born as a solution devised by Rackspace and NASA to solve a specific problem. Read more

Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator: Muneeb Kalathil

I started using Linux when I was in school. But at that point, I was limited to Installation and running a few commands. I really started learning and growing my interest in Linux while I was working on my degree in Computer Applications. My first distribution was Red Hat CentOS. I spent many hours learning Linux and enjoyed it. Read more