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Reviews

The Best Free And Open Source Photo Managers For Linux – Review And Comparison

Filed under
Linux
OSS
Reviews

Cheap smartphones and digital cameras – the principal factor of digital revolution. Every man can create a personal collection with gigabytes or even terabytes of multimedia content, and online services like the Google Photos or Flickr can help to save them. Clouds are good, but sometimes the local work with multimedia is more speedy and effective. Photo manager can organize your chaos and highlight the best or the worst material with tags and rating; some software also have some photo editing features: red eyes, contrast and defects correction, colors and shadows level. If you are working with RAW formats, the photo manager can make your life easier with image processing and converting to popular formats; some photo managers have also video support. In this review I want to tell about the best software that can be run on Linux and other operating system.

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Nextbit Robin Review

Filed under
Android
Reviews

Crowdfunding isn’t a new concept and while many projects do fail to see the light of day, just occasionally, we’re treated to a project that has the potential to alter the way we use technology. The problem of limited storage is one that affects the growing number of devices that launch without microSD card expansion, but American company Nextbit has a unique solution to this growing problem with its Nextbit Robin smartphone.

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Glitches Mar Makulu's Appeal

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Makulu 10 Xfce edition continues developer Jacque Raymer's track record of pushing the limits with useful and innovative features to keep his distro line a step ahead of the crowd.

He released Makulu 10 Xfce this week after more than 12 months in the making. The focus on this build is stability, speed and social integration. After spending several frustrating days chasing away glitches, I found that the Xfce edition can claim success with two of those three goals.

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PCLinuxOS: the walking dead

Filed under
PCLOS
Reviews

If you thought that this review would continue with the usual sections like keyboard setup, list of applications, network drive connectivity and so on, I must disappoint you.

My time with PCLinuxOS KDE 2014.12 finished at that point. I see no reason to test a distribution that is so narrow-minded that it cannot allow users outside of the US to use it out of the box, and that does not bother with updating their core ISO image. There are plenty of distributions that work much better than PCLinuxOS.

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XStream Desktop 153

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Reviews

Launching XStream's system installer brings up a series of text screens. Each screen displays a group of fields or menus we a can navigate with the page up/down keys and the function keys. The installer begins by asking us on which hard disk we want to install XStream. We are then given the option of using the entire disk or installing XStream on a specific partition. Once we have selected a free partition, we are asked to provide a hostname for our computer. We are then given the option of automatically setting up networking using DHCP or we can set up our network card by manually providing network settings. We then select our time zone from a list and confirm the system clock has the correct time. The following screen gets us to create a password for the root account and set up a new user account for ourselves. The installer copies its files to our hard drive and then gives us the option to either view the installation log or quit. Taking the latter option returns us to the menu where we can run the installer, access a command line shell or reboot.

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More distro tests on Lenovo G50

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Reviews

How are we doing here? Well, okay. Not stellar, but not bad either. New technology will always take time getting adopted and implemented properly. For instance, UEFI is no longer an issue. But I am more worried about in-between-release inconsistency in the quality of drivers for the network and power management rather than the fact something works or not. Things that suddenly break are far more serious.

Provided they work in the first place. Of the three major distro families, Red Hat is out of the picture. Ubuntu suffers from Wireless hiccups. Well, all of them really, to be honest. Bluetooth remains unreliable. And there are some other issues and problems. I won't be comparing to Windows, because it really makes no sense. In fact, early on, Windows 10 had some major difficulties with the hardware, too.

All in all, if you are keen on using Linux, statistically, your initial boot luck stands at about 75%, the probability of failing when it comes to networking is about 0.3, and if you need strong smartphone or Bluetooth support, you will be disappointed. Ubuntu clearly leads overall, which is kind of expected, haters be hating. Anyhow, this is where we stand, end of 2015 early 2016, a laptop that is less than one year old. If you are looking for the latest and greatest, hardware and Linux wise, the initial ride could be a little rough and tough. But definitely quite doable and fun. Provided you choose Ubuntu. Hard facts, 30+ distros tested. Hint: This is not the end of it. Far from it. We'll get some more funky distros under our belt, or my name isn't Sam. Maybe even Fedora. Who knows. Hint. See you around, fellas.

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Also: LLVM Clang 3.8 Compiler Performance Benchmarks

How To Disable Touchpad While Writing Article Or Documentation In Ubuntu/Linux Mint Or Derivatives Linux

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
Ubuntu
HowTos

I am a blogger so most of my time goes in writing articles and tutorials. One problem that I have been facing while typing is that my palm comes in contact with the touchpad and the cursor moves somewhere else on the screen or editor and my article is all messed up. I even have to rethink and rewrite sometime when many lines have got deleted due to this problem. But finally I have found the solution to this problem. Here is how you can fix this.

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RebeccaBlackOS 2016-02-08 Review. Why? Because it’s Friday.

Filed under
OS
Reviews

These are the types of problems found in an independent distro build from scratch. I cannot understand how a system built on Debian could be this buggy and apparently have zero VM support which Debian comes with by default. I can take some solace in the fact that it was built by one person and that one person is a Rebecca Black fan but as far as a Linux Distribution is concerned there is not much here. Some could say “Well its not supposed to be taken as a serious Distribution.” True except it is listed and kept up with on DistroWatch therefor it should be held as a system ready distribution especially when it was not released as a beta or an RC. If this distribution is ever going to be considered a real platform it has a long way to go. I give it about as many thumbs down as the Rebecca Black Friday video.

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Blackberry Priv review: Finally succumbs to Android, and does well!

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Android
Reviews

To start, the Priv is an Android device with a physical keyboard — this is unique (but not the first). The screen slides up to reveal the 4-row keypad which, incidentally, also doubles up as a trackpad (similar to the BlackBerry passport). The screen is a 2k resolution amoled unit with gorgeous colours and deep blacks. It slides out with a satisfying (and sometimes addictive) spring-loaded action. It also curves slightly on both sides and this allows for some 'edge' functionality like a single line battery indicator and slide out actions. Under the keypad, you'll see the speaker grill. On top, there is a slot each for a nano SIM and micro SD. The micro USB port and 3.5mm audio out are on the bottom edge. Power button is on the left while the volume rocker is on the right. Around the back is a familiar glass weave design — it looks like carbon fiber but is soft to the touch, resists fingerprints and is very durable.

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Vector Linux 7.1 Light

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Reviews

If you find yourself needing a new firefox but your computer and glibc is too old, Vector Linux 7.1 light will fit the bill. People who are more comfortable with a SysV style init over systemd will breathe a sign of relief. All in all VL 7.1 is a viable choice for users who wish to continue using their older computers with a modern web browser.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS: Meteoric Rise of Open Source, Document Foundation, Facebook U-Turn, Collaborative Knowledge Foundation, Slovenia Open Data

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    The adoption and integration of open-source technologies have rapidly usurped the closed-source incumbents, so much so that investors are pouring record amounts of money into open-source software investments.
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    Thursday, 28th September 2017 will be a special day – not only is it the seventh birthday of The Document Foundation, but we will also be running an “Ask me (us) Anything” session on Reddit – specifically, the /r/linux subreddit.
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    Faced with growing dissatisfaction about licensing requirements for some of its open-source projects, Facebook today said it will move React, Jest, Flow, and Immutable.js under the MIT license next week. "We're relicensing these projects because React is the foundation of a broad ecosystem of open source software for the web, and we don't want to hold back forward progress for nontechnical reasons," said Facebook engineering director Adam Wolff in a blog post on Friday. Wolff said while Facebook continues to believe its BSD + Patents license has benefits, "we acknowledge that we failed to decisively convince this community."
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    This week, eLife and Collaborative Knowledge Foundation announced a partnership “to build a user-driven, open-source submission and peer-review platform” aimed at improving on existing industry models. Working together, the two organisations “hope to accelerate progress in delivering a modern, fast and user-driven system,” they said in a press release. “The project will be designed to help streamline communications between authors, editors and reviewers at all stages of the submission and review process.”
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End of Debian-Administration.org and 32-bit Support in Manjaro Linux

  • Retiring the Debian-Administration.org site
    So previously I've documented the setup of the Debian-Administration website, and now I'm going to retire it I'm planning how that will work.
  • Manjaro Linux Discontinues 32-bit Support
    You might already know that I love Manjaro Linux. And as an ardent Manjaro Linux fan, I have a bad news for you. Recently, Philip, the lead developer of Manjaro Linux, announced that the project would be dropping support for the 32-bit architecture. He said that the reason for the move was “due to the decreasing popularity of i686 among the developers and the community”.

Android Leftovers

Red Hat and Fedora: Patent Promise and Fedora Community

  • Red Hat Enlarges Its Open Source Patent Promise Umbrella
    Red Hat on Thursday announced major enhancements to the Patent Promise it first published 15 years ago, with the intention of providing new protections to innovation in the open source community. In its 2002 Patent Promise, Red Hat vowed not to pursue patent infringement actions against parties that used its covered Free and Open Source Software, or FOSS, subject to certain limitations. The current Patent Promise reaffirms the 2002 pledge and extends the zone of non-enforcement.
  • Red Hat breaks new ground with open source Patent Promise
    Red Hat has decided to revise its 2002 Patent Promise that originally signalled the company’s intention not to enforce its patents against free and open source software. The company, which is famed for its open source approach, had laid out in its original promise that it was designed to discourage patent aggression against free and open source software. The updated version not only reaffirms this but “extends the zone of non-enforcement.”
  • Two Docs Workshops at Flock 2017
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  • Join the Magazine team
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