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Reviews

Review: KDE neon 5.9.1

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KDE
Reviews

It has been a while since I've done a review of a Linux distribution. Lately, I've seen a few reviews of KDE neon (the second word being intentionally written in lowercase), and some of them have praised it as being much better than Kubuntu (the traditionally KDE spin of Ubuntu). That got my attention, so I figured I should check it out.

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Samsung’s Chromebook Pro gives me hope in Chrome OS—thanks to Android’s help

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Android
Reviews

The market is about to be flooded with a new wave of Chromebooks, all focused on Android apps. Chrome OS and Android were always meant for different devices, but now OEMs are making Chromebooks that can deliver the best of both worlds. Google's Play Store has already come to some older Chromebooks, but Samsung's new Chromebook Plus and Pro models are the first that explicitly play up their Android compatibility.

These devices follow in the footsteps of the Asus Chromebook Flip, which was the first Chrome OS two-in-one back when the operating system didn't really lend itself to that type of hardware design. Now a convertible design is apt to run Chrome OS and Android apps on the same system, but this union of operating systems isn't perfect yet.

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An Everyday Linux User Review Of Fedora 25 - Oh No, So Many Problems

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Red Hat
Reviews

So where does that leave us?

I have always loved Fedora but I love music more and the amount of hassle and the amount of hoops I have had to jump through to try and get it working this time is just not worth the effort. The Google Chrome thing is also an issue for me. It works fine in openSUSE so why is it not working in Fedora?

Wayland seems to be performing well enough and I haven't experienced any problems that seem to be related to the graphical side of things.

Unfortunately I have witnessed far too many errors, notifications, application crashes and general pointless pain to be able to recommend Fedora 25. Fedora 23 worked great, 25 doesn't.

I recommend either CentOS or openSUSE for now.

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Remix OS: Is This the Droid You Were Looking For?

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GNU
Linux
Google
Reviews

Ever wanted to try Android on your PC but there weren’t any really usable projects? Now you can. Remix OS is an Android based operating system that’s designed to offer a full-fledged desktop PC-like experience. The developers have done a lot of work to implement many desktop-centric features such as multi-window multi-tasking. It offers a very familiar interface inspired by Windows, so the learning curve is not that steep. If you have used Android before, you will find yourself at home.

Remix OS is being developed by Jide Technologies, a company founded by three ex-Googlers, “with a mission to unlock the potential of Android in order to accelerate a new age of computing,” reads the “about us” page.

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OpenSUSE Leap 42.2 Gnome - Better but not really

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Reviews
SUSE

It is time to give Leap a second chance. Let me be extra corny. Give leap a chance. Yes. Well, several weeks ago, I reviewed the Plasma edition of the latest openSUSE release, and while it was busy firing all cannon, like a typical Stormtrooper, most of the beams did not hit the target. It was a fairly mediocre distro, delivering everything but then stopping just short of the goodness mark.

I will now conduct a Gnome experiment. Load the distro with a fresh new desktop environment, and see how it behaves. We did something rather similar with CentOS recently, with some rather surprising results. Hint. Maybe we will get lucky. Let's do it.

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Also new: Tumbleweed Snapshots Bring Users New Vulkan, 4.9.7 Kernel

Android Wear 2.0 review: Google's second swing at smartwatches

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Android
Reviews

Wear 2.0 is launching first on a pair of new watches from LG that were designed in conjunction with Google: the $349 Watch Sport and the $249 Watch Style. And if you happen to be one of those people who did buy an Android Wear watch before, it’s likely coming to your wrist, too.

The Watch Sport and Watch Style are meant to showcase all of the new features found in Wear 2.0, from Android Pay, to LTE connections, to the improved Google Assistant. They are the cutting edge of Google-powered watches, but they won’t be alone for long — you can expect many more Android Wear watches running the platform to arrive this year.

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LG K8 Review: The Best Looking Budget Android Phone Around

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Android
Reviews

The high-end segment of the smartphone space is dominated by Apple and Samsung. This has been the case for a good couple of years now, and most other OEMs seldom get a look in.

Apple shifted over 70 million iPhones during its last financial quarter; that is an insane number of units – even more so when you consider how much iPhones cost.

For this reason – and plenty more besides – many Android phone makers are focussing their efforts on the sub-£150 segment of the phone market. Here things are equally competitive, as tech brands constantly innovative and redefine what we consider to be a budget-friendly phone, but, importantly, there is no Apple and there’s more room to manoeuvre.

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Solus 2017.01.01.0: Impressive newcomer

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Reviews

Solus is an independent Linux distribution where the rising Budgie desktop was born. Despite the fact it is relatively a new Linux distribution, Solus brings many stunning features. The most interesting feature is, of course, the superstar Budgie desktop that has catalyzed another important project called Ubuntu Budgie. The newest version of Solus, Solus 2017.01.01.0, was released on January 2017 and offers us plenty of new and interesting things to look around.

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MX-16 Xfce: very close to the ideal

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Reviews

The MX Linux distribution is a relatively new name in the Linux world. However, its predecessors MEPIS and antiX were both popular some time ago. I even reviewed SimplyMEPIS 11.0 KDE back in 2012.

I am not very sure what MX means. Is it a reference to Mexico? Or to Moto-cross? Of just a hybrid of Mepis and antiX? You can comment your ideas below.

Debian Stable is the backbone of this distribution. It is Debian 8 Jessie version that was used as a base for the latest MX release.

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SalentOS Switchers Will Have No Regrets

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OS
Reviews

SalentOS is a Linux distro that easily can put a smile on your face. It is a flexible and accommodating desktop platform that balances demands on system resources with efficient performance.

SalentOS is not well known, but it has much to offer. This distro makes it easy to leave behind whatever other computing choice you currently use.

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Security Leftovers

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  • Open-source developers targeted in sophisticated malware attack
    For the past few months, developers who publish their code on GitHub have been targeted in an attack campaign that uses a little-known but potent cyberespionage malware. The attacks started in January and consisted of malicious emails specifically crafted to attract the attention of developers, such as requests for help with development projects and offers of payment for custom programming jobs. The emails had .gz attachments that contained Word documents with malicious macro code attached. If allowed to execute, the macro code executed a PowerShell script that reached out to a remote server and downloaded a malware program known as Dimnie.
  • A scramble at Cisco exposes uncomfortable truths about U.S. cyber defense
    When WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange disclosed earlier this month that his anti-secrecy group had obtained CIA tools for hacking into technology products made by U.S. companies, security engineers at Cisco Systems (CSCO.O) swung into action. The Wikileaks documents described how the Central Intelligence Agency had learned more than a year ago how to exploit flaws in Cisco's widely used Internet switches, which direct electronic traffic, to enable eavesdropping. Senior Cisco managers immediately reassigned staff from other projects to figure out how the CIA hacking tricks worked, so they could help customers patch their systems and prevent criminal hackers or spies from using the same methods, three employees told Reuters on condition of anonymity.
  • NTPsec: a Secure, Hardened NTP Implementation
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  • Zelda Coatings
    I assume that every permutation of scams will eventually be tried; it is interesting that the initial ones preyed on people's avarice and dishonesty: "I will transfer millions to your bank account, then you share with me" - with subsequent scams appealing to another demographic: "I want to donate a large sum to your religious charity" - to perhaps capture a more virtuous but still credulous lot. Where will it end ?

Tizen and Android

Linux and Linux Foundation

Mesa and Intel Graphics