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AeroCool AeroPower black/silver line 550W

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Hardware
Reviews

Something new from the "I want, I want" dept.:

The power supply unit is the heart of every system and power demands keep on continuously rising on a daily basis. This certain fact requires that you will require something stronger regrettably to many enthusiasts. Why not combine something stronger with great aesthetics while upgrading? AeroCool has an answer for your next power supply upgrade, the AeroPower black/silver line 550W power supply unit.

Movietime: XXX: State of the Union

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Movies
Reviews
-s

Starring Samuel L. Jackson's wig and Ice Cube's fake "attitude", this film lives up the legacy of the first Triple X, and even surpassed it.

My Mutagenix Monday

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Linux
Reviews
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Mutagenix is a suite of four livecd variations from which to choose. It comes in basic Rescue CD, KDE 3.4, xfce, and gnome (freerock .2.0) versions ranging from 99mb to almost 600mb. Quite the bold undertaking for our hero I must say. He defines Mutagenix as "A dynamic and mutable variant of Linux; Any one of several LiveCDs based on Slackware and Linux-Live." Today, I thought I'd boot up two versions of the latest release, Mutagenix 2.6.10-1.

AMD Athlon 64 4800+ X2 - Dual Core CPU

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Hardware
Reviews

Today we’re a step closer to the launch of Athlon 64 X2 but it’s not here quite yet - you’ll have to wait until June for that pleasure. Until the official launch happens we won’t be able to get our hands on a fully fledged Athlon 64 X2 PC, so what we have here is a technical preview based on an AMD press kit of an Asus A8N SLI Deluxe motherboard, an Athlon 64 X2 4800+ and 1GB of Corsair 3200XL Pro memory.

A Damn Small Sunday

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Linux
Reviews
-s

Damn Small Linux released version 1.1 Thursday, May 5 with a few new features and some fixed bugs, yet still a 50MB download. Actually it's a 49.1 MB download. Also avaiable are bootable 128MB USB pen drives and an embedded on usb version (that will run from within a booted os without having to reboot specifically into dsl). I couldn't let this occasion sneak by without notice.

Revoltec Graphic Freezer and be quiet! Polar Freezer

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Hardware
Reviews

There are far too many VGA cards on the market at the moment, and most of them need good cooling solutions and some are made to need even better cooling solutions by the people using them. The answer comes from Revoltec and be quiet!, sister companies to each other, in the form of the Graphic Freezer and Polar Freezer respectively.

OpenOffice a Strong Competitor

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Reviews

It's weird how things can come back to bite you. Microsoft Corp. killed off the competition for office software suites and became a de facto monopoly in the area, with what result? The competition is back and, this time, it's free!

Cheaper laptops full of features

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Hardware
Reviews

When you're buying something as pricey as a new laptop, it takes courage to stray from the comfort of established names like Dell, IBM and Sony. And it's the sort of courage that can easily lead to "penny-wise, pound-foolish" regrets after the purchase.

ATI's Radeon X800 XL 512MB

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Hardware
Reviews

Is More Video Memory Worth the Money? You'll soon be seeing X800XL-based cards equipped with 512MB frame buffers. Is more memory the answer to our problems, especially since you don't get any more memory bandwidth, just a bigger data "parking lot?"

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today's howtos

Linux v5.1-rc6

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