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Reviews

Ubuntu To Ship On Lenovo Thinkpad L450 In India - Welcome Ubuntu

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News
Reviews
Ubuntu


Ubuntu To Ship On Lenovo Thinkpad L450 In India - Welcome Ubuntu

I am very happy with the news that yesterday Canonical declared the launch of Ubuntu in India on Lenovo Thinkpad L450. Yes, you heard right! I was waiting for them to come in India and now wait is over! The laptops may be start shipping early this month. Let's take a deeper look at the Lenovo Thinkpad L450 on which Ubuntu is being shipped. Ubuntu Istiqbal/Swagat hai! (We welcome Ubuntu).

Read At LinuxAndUbuntu

Review bq Aquaris E5 - Ubuntu Edition

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Reviews
Ubuntu

The bq Aquaris E5 is solid device. On the software side there aren't any big issues. Also the hardware of the E4.5 and E5 is so similar that one is as good os the other when it comes to running the installed software.

Anyway the bq Aquaris E5 is still a device for Ubuntu enthisiasts. You'll a get a pretty good device for 200€. The price is only 30€ higher compared to the E4.5, but includes a bigger and better display.

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Purism Librem 13 Review

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Reviews

I want one. Maybe I've just spent too long on older hardware but it's nice to be able to use a laptop with modern specs without having to compromise on my Open Source and privacy ideals. The Librem 15 was definitely too big for me but while the Librem 13 is bigger than most of my personal laptops, it's about the same size as a modern Thinkpad X series (but thinner and lighter). I'm more than willing to add an inch or so to the width in exchange for such a nice, large, high-res screen. Even though my X200 is technically smaller, it's definitely heavier and just feels clunkier.

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ChaletOS 14.04.2 review - Digital white chocolate

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Reviews

ChaletOS is a Xubuntu-derived distribution, with very little to no publicity surrounding it. Even its official domain, a humble, unassuming Google sites page, does not offer too much information. I came across ChaletOS while reading Gizmo's Freeware forums, and I was hooked by its rather stylish, colorful looks.

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Also: SuperX 3.0 Grace review - Saving, ahem, grace

5 Best Linux Desktop Environments With Pros & Cons

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KDE
Linux
Reviews


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If you are new to Linux then I'm sure you are giving up lots of time choosing Desktop Environment of your Linux Distribution. You are probably thinking to give a try to each one of them but that's very time consuming. That's why here I'm reviewing the 5 Best Linux Desktop Environments with the pros & cons. The article gives you what you should know for choosing a DE. So let's get started!

Reat At LinuxAndUbuntu

Fedora 22: not obvious excellence

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Red Hat
Reviews

Fedora 22 GNOME felt very snappy for me. All windows opened and closed very quickly in the Live session. There were no bugs or crashes during my Live run. The system was stable.

However, I felt quite uncomfortable in the system itself. I think it is partially because I am not very familiar with GNOME 3, and its concept is not very close to my heart.

But I must admit that in many places Fedora 22 left the impression of something unfinished, still requiring polishing. I've never felt this in recent releases of Ubuntu or Linux Mint. Some applications like Weather or Map still lack features that we take for granted in similar web tools.

I wish the Fedora team success in improving their system in future releases, and see them soon!

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Review: Linux Mint 17.2 Release is Refreshed and Faster

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Linux
Reviews

Linux Mint 17.2 "Rafaela" MATE was launched last week and, as usual, I installed it on my machines to see how this distro is progressing. I found a refreshed, faster and more feature-rich distro that's well worth trying.

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Exploring Alpine Linux 3.2.0

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Reviews

Alpine Linux has become one of the most frequently requested distributions on my list of projects to review. Alpine is an independent distribution which, as the project's front page tells us, is "a security-oriented, lightweight Linux distribution based on musl libc and busybox." The project's About page goes into more detail: "Alpine Linux is a very simple distribution that will try to stay out of your way. It uses its own package manager, called apk, the OpenRC init system, script driven set-ups and that's it! This provides you with a simple, crystal-clear Linux environment without all the noise. You can then add on top of that just the packages you need for your project, so whether it's building a home PVR, or an iSCSI storage controller, a wafer-thin mail server container, or a rock-solid embedded switch, nothing else will get in the way."

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BQ Aquaris E5: An Ubuntu Edition Phone that severely disappoints

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Reviews
Ubuntu

I can't begin to tell you how saddened I am that I've had to write this. I wanted the Ubuntu Phone to completely blow me away and pull me from the Android platform with ease and grace. Instead, it solidified my opinion that jumping into the ring with Android and Apple is a fight that most aren't really ready to take up.

Please, Canonical, go back to the drawing board and return with a UI that makes sense... or simply return all of your focus on what you do best and leave the mobile platform to Google and Apple.

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Mageia 5 Linux Distro Offers New Tools, Improved Stability

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GNU
Linux
MDV
Reviews

The Mageia 5 Linux distribution, which launched June 19, provides new tools, improved stability and overall ease of use. The Mageia Linux distro was first formed in September 2010 as a fork of French Linux distribution Mandriva. While Mandriva as a commercial entity ceased operation in May of this year, Mageia is alive and well, continuing on its mission of creating a user-friendly desktop-focused Linux distribution. New features in Mageia 5 include support for Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI) hardware, which enables Mageia to run on a broader array of systems than previously. Historically, Mandriva was focused on the KDE Linux desktop as the default. In addition to KDE, Mageia offers users an easy installation choice of other desktops, including GNOME 3.14, Cinnamon 2.4.5 and Xfce 4.12. With Mageia 5, the Btrfs next-generation Linux file system is now fully supported, providing users with a robust file system capability. Helping users move from Microsoft's Windows operating system is also part of Mageia 5, which has a Windows settings import feature. eWEEK examines key highlights of the Mageia 5 Linux distribution release.

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Also: Mageia 5: I See no Change... and That's Good!

OpenMandriva Lx 2014.2 Screencast and Screenshots

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Brocade CEO: Transition To Open Source Will Be Difficult For Cisco

Communications CEO Lloyd Carney said traditional vendors like Cisco will have a tough time adapting to a more software-defined, open source space. That's because traditional vendors like Cisco's revenue streams are tied to closed architectures, Carney said. Read more