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Reviews

Ubuntu Unity Remix 18.04: Quick Look, More Info & Download Links

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Reviews
Ubuntu

First, I like Unity. While I saw news about Unity 7 abandonment and Canonical's decision to use GNOME instead, I believed that someday a new Ubuntu with Unity 7 will come. The Ubuntu Unity Remix is now likely the answer to my expectation. So this new Unity 7 revival project makes me happy and I believe, many of you will be happy too. Second, my expectation is of course Ubuntu Unity Remix to become official flavor next year. Third, I hope the developers could provide 32bit version so the users using old computers can still use it. Fourth, finally, let us help the development of Ubuntu Unity Remix by informing the others about it or by directly joining the team. Thank you Ubuntu Unity Remix developers!

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Also: Fans of “Unity Desktop” Are Working on a New Remix

Hands On with Linux Mint 18.3 Cinnamon and MATE

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Linux
Reviews

This is a fundamentally good decision, considering the limited resources available to the Mint development team, and how different KDE is from Linux Mint's core distributions of Cinnamon and MATE. Not only at the user interface level but perhaps even more importantly at the development level, the libraries, the utilities and applications, pretty much everything is different. But that is not going to make this hurt any less for the long-time dedicated Mint KDE users.

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Ubuntu 17.10: Return of the GNOME

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GNOME
Reviews
Ubuntu

If you've been following the Linux world at all, you know this has been an entire year for spring cleaning. Early in 2017, Canonical stopped work on its homegrown Unity desktop, Mir display server, and its larger vision of "convergence"—a unified interface for Ubuntu for phones, tablets, and desktops.

And now almost exactly six years after Ubuntu first switched from GNOME 2 to the Unity desktop, that has been dropped, too. The distro is back to GNOME, and Canonical recently released Ubuntu 17.10, a major update with some significant changes coming to the popular Ubuntu Linux operating system.

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Review: Artix Linux

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Reviews

At the start of my trial, in fact for the first day or two, I was not a fan of Artix Linux. I'm not, generally speaking, in favour of installers that download packages over the Internet, especially when I plan to perform multiple installs. And the first time through my attempt to start with a minimal desktop environment resulted in me not having a working desktop at all. This is probably my fault as I must have missed a necessary package somewhere in the selection, but I think (since I was installing the LXQt edition) it would have made sense for the distribution to automatically install all the components necessary to run a minimal graphical environment.

Once the distribution was installed and running, I ran into a few bugs, such as the folder icon not opening the file manager and the VLC media player failing to run. These are relatively minor bugs in the big picture, but with such a minimal distribution any malfunctioning applications stand out. I also ran into a bug early on where the QTerminal window would open partly off the screen and could not be moved. I had to disable the "remember window position" option in QTerminal to get the window to open entirely on my display.

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Xubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark - The winter is ... meh

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Reviews
Ubuntu

I must say I'm a bit sad. Xubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark is nowhere near as good as its predecessor. It comes with a slew of bugs and regressions inherited from Ubuntu without any validations or checks. The experience is flawed, with middling hardware support, although the rest of the stack is quite reasonable. You get blazing performance, good looks, and decent overall out-of-the-box experience with media and gadgets.

However, that on its own means nothing - because when you compare to Zingy Zorba, this is a release that does everything slightly less well, and it comes with problems and issues we did not have before. Do we really need these hope-killing releases that undo all that's gone before? Xubuntu was really doing well, and then, wham, regressions. Seriously? Why? Anyway, 6/10. Worth testing - better than Ubuntu or Kubuntu of the autumn stock, but still not as good as what we've seen, known and love. Take care, fellow Tuxians.

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LinuxAndUbuntu Review Of Ubuntu MATE 17.10

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Ubuntu Mate 17.10 is a pretty stable and rock solid distribution which has got most things right. There is nothing unlikable about the distro. However, I feel it could have been a lot better if they had allowed 4 windows to be snapped on each corners and done something about the opaque top panel. The software included are very much standard and even though some of their names have been changed we all know what’s under the hood. Overall Experience has been good. Having already tested Ubuntu with Gnome 3, I can say that Ubuntu Mate 17.10 feels a lot faster and quicker in terms of GUI response.

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REVIEW: The OnePlus 5T is not only a bargain, it's the best Android phone you can buy at any price

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Android
Reviews

The new OnePlus 5T is an excellent smartphone, but thing about it stands out from the rest — its $500 price.

That amount is actually near the top of what OnePlus has charged for its past smartphones. But the price is hundreds of dollars cheaper than that of many other top-of-the-line devices. Indeed, many of the latest flagship smartphones, including Apple's iPhone X and Samsung's Galaxy Note 8, cost more than $900.

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OnePlus 5T review: Come for the value, not the excitement

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Android
Reviews

OnePlus isn't interested in holding back on specs, features or capabilities to make a big reveal of a new phone just once a year. The scrappy company has settled in on a refresh cycle every six months, with a big release followed by a mid-cycle bump to bring in the latest things it's been working on. The OnePlus 5T isn't meant to be an innovative leap of technology that blows your socks off — and honestly, none of its predecessors have been particularly groundbreaking, either.

Nope, the 5T is still about value, simplicity and being tuned for what the Android enthusiast crowd craves from its phones. At $479 there wasn't much about the OnePlus 5 you could find a flaw with. Now six months later with a bigger screen, new secondary camera, neat Face Unlock feature and a $20 price bump, it's a pretty easy equation to figure out.

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OnePlus 5T review—An outstanding combination of specs, design, and price

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Android
Reviews

After launching the OnePlus 5 earlier this year, OnePlus is back with an end-of-year upgrade for the device. The OnePlus 5T takes a winning formula—high-end specs with a low price tag and a metal body—and reworks the front of the phone to dedicate as much space as possible to the screen. This device has a new screen, a new button layout, a new fingerprint reader, and a new camera setup. It almost feels like a totally new device.

We liked the OnePlus 5 from earlier in the year, but, with the more modern design, OnePlus has fixed OnePlus 5's biggest downside. The result is something that is extremely compelling—a $500 phone that makes you question exactly why you'd give $800 to those other OEMs when this has nearly everything the more expensive phones have.

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Review: Fedora 27 Workstation

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Red Hat
Reviews

On the whole there are several things to like about Fedora 27. The operating system was stable during my trial and I like that there are several session options, depending on whether we want to use Wayland or the X display server or even a more traditional-looking version of GNOME. I am happy to see Wayland is coming along to the point where it is close to on par with the X session. There are some corner cases to address, but GNOME on Wayland has improved a lot in the past year.

I like the new LibreOffice feature which lets us sign and verify documents and I like GNOME's new settings panel. These are all small, but notable steps forward for GNOME, LibreOffice and Fedora.

Most of the complaints I had this week had more to do with GNOME specifically than Fedora as an operating system. GNOME on Fedora is sluggish on my systems, both on the desktop computer and in VirtualBox, especially the Wayland session. This surprised me as when I ran GNOME's Wayland session on Ubuntu last month, the desktop performed quite a bit better. Ubuntu's GNOME on Wayland session was smooth and responsive, but Fedora's was too slow for me to use comfortably and I switched over to using the X session for most of my trial.

Two other big differences I felt keenly between Ubuntu and Fedora were with regards to how these two leading projects set up GNOME. On Ubuntu we have a dock that acts as a task switcher, making it a suitable environment for multitasking. Fedora's GNOME has no equivalent. This means Fedora's GNOME is okay for running one or two programs at a time, but I tend to run eight or nine applications at any given moment. This becomes very awkward when using Fedora's default GNOME configuration as it is hard to switch between open windows quickly, at least without installing an extension. In a similar vein, Ubuntu's GNOME has window control buttons and Fedora's version does not, which again adds a few steps to what are usually very simple, quick actions.

What it comes down to is I feel like Ubuntu takes GNOME and turns it into a full featured desktop environment, while Fedora provides us with just plain GNOME which feels more like a framework for a desktop we can then shape with extensions rather than a complete desktop environment. In fact, I think that describes Fedora's approach in general - the distribution feels more like a collection of open source utilities rather than an integrated whole. Earlier I mentioned LibreOffice can work with signed documents, but Fedora has no key manager, meaning we need to find and download one. Fedora ships with Totem, which is a fine video player, but it doesn't work with Wayland, making it an odd default choice. These little gaps or missed connections show up occasionally and it sets the distribution apart from other projects like openSUSE or Linux Mint where there is a stronger sense the pieces of the operating system working together with a unified vision.

The big puzzle for me this week was with software updates. Linux effectively solved updating software and being able to keep running without a pause, reboot or lock-up decades ago. Other mainstream distributions have fast updates - some even have atomic, on-line updates. openSUSE has software snapshots through the file system, Ubuntu has live kernel updates that do away with rebooting entirely and NixOS has atomic, versioned updates via the package manager, to name just three examples. But Fedora has taken a big step backward in making updates require an immediate reboot, and taking an unusually long time to complete the update process, neither of which benefits the user.

Fedora has some interesting features and I like that it showcases new technologies. It's a good place to see what new items are going to be landing in other projects next year. However, Fedora feels more and more like a testing ground for developers and less like a polished experience for people to use as their day-to-day operating system.

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Educational-Oriented Escuelas Linux 5.6 Distro Released with LibreOffice 6.0

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