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Reviews

Sparky Linux 5.8

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Reviews

Today we are looking at Sparky Linux 5.8. This point release of Sparky 5 comes with LXQt 0.14.1, Debian Buster, Linux Kernel 4.19 and uses about 350MB of ram when idling.

Sparky Linux LXQt has become one of my favorites, as it has a modern feeling, with the latest of Qt and the stability of Debian, makes it one great combination. Enjoy!

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Direct/video: Sparky Linux 5.8 Run Through

Under an hour ago:

  • What?s next Sparky?

    As before, after releasing a new stable version of Sparky, there are a few changes to do.

    So…

    Sparky 4 “Tyche” is moved to oldstable line now.
    The latest 4.11 release is the last one of the 4 line, but it is still supported, the next 2 years about.

    Sparky 5 “Nibiru” just released, moving it from testing to stable line.
    The stable live/install media are available for i686, amd64 & armhf archs (the same as the older release).

Deepin 15.11

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Reviews
Debian

Today we are looking at Deepin 15.11. Deepin 15.11 is a fantastic release of Deepin, I couldn't find any faults and it just feels so much more stable, with Debian Buster and Kwin Window Manager.

One, of the newest features, which I noticed, I guess there will be mixed emotions is that they have now an optional built-in cloud service, currently only available in China, I don't know how secure it will be and exactly what it's purpose will be.

Another thing which I noticed is, that Deepin Driver Manager comes now pre-installed and their version of Crossover is upgraded to Crossover 18, available in the Software Center.

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Direct/video: Deepin 15.11 Run Through

Neon: A Wannabe Linux Distro For KDE Lovers

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KDE
Reviews

KDE Neon is a bit of an oddball Linux thing. Linuxland has an impressive collection of oddball things.

Neon looks and feels much like a Linux distribution, but its developers assert quite openly on their website that Neon is not a real Linux distro. It just installs and functions like one -- sort of.

That can make deciding to use it a little confusing. Neon appears to be a Linux operating system. It boots your computer. It displays a full desktop environment. It runs *some* applications so you can go about your computing tasks much like using any other -- ahh -- real Linux distribution.

That last part is a clue to what makes KDE Neon different.

Getting somewhat technical for a minute, KDE Neon is more of a specialty offering than a fully endowed operating system. Other distros support a wide range of applications from the same software format type.

For example, Ubuntu runs .Deb formatted packages from the Debian Linux family. All .Deb packages will run on Ubuntu- and other Debian-based distros. Which desktop environment is used does not matter, be it KDE, Xfce, GNOME or whatever.

Ditto for RPM-based Linux distributions, like Fedora and Red Hat. All you need is a package management tool or knowledge of the commands for apt, yum or pacman, depending on the distribution's Linux family. However, that is a skill set that lots of Linux users never had to learn.

Not so with KDE Neon. Neon runs only a specific category of KDE applications: the latest. Neon's developers assert that their "pseudo" distro does not support most other software. In fact, non-KDE packages most likely will not even install on Neon.

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Feren OS Next 19.07 Beta

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Today we are looking at Feren OS Next 19.07 Beta. Feren OS Next is Feren's distro in development, a work in progress, but it is improving a lot and this is a major release for this distro, as it is now called Beta.

It is based on Ubuntu 18.04.2, uses Linux Kernel 4.18 and KDE Plasma 5.16.3. It uses about 700MB of ram when idling.

Since the last point release, its highly customized features have been stabilized, not perfect yet as expected, and new features and graphical art has been added. It is truly becoming a beautiful and unique KDE Plasma distro.

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Original/video: Feren OS Next 19.07 Beta Run Through

Endeavour OS 2019.07.15

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Reviews

Today we are looking at the first stable release of Endeavour OS. It is a project that started to continue the spirit of the recently discontinued Antergos. The developing team exists out of Antergos developers and community members.

As you can see in this first stable release, it is far from just a continuing of Antergos as we know it. The stable release is an offline Calamres installer and it just came with a customized XFCE desktop environment. They are planning to have an online installer again in the future, which will give a person an option to choose between 10 desktop environments, similar to Antergos.

It is based on Arch, Linux Kernel 5.2, XFCE 4.14 pre2 and it uses about 500mb of ram.

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Direct/video: Endeavour OS 2019.07.15 Run Through

Feren OS 19.07

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Today we are looking at Feren OS 19.07. It is based on Linux Mint 19.1, so indirectly Ubuntu 18.04, which is supported until April 2023. It comes with Cinnamon and Nemo 4.0 and Linux Kernel 4.15. It uses about 1GB of ram when idling.

Feren Os is a highly customized version of Linux Mint, which is semi-rolling, it is as rolling as a Ubuntu LTS distro can be, yet it is a very stable and reliable, as well as beautiful and by each release just getting better and better.

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Direct/video: Feren OS 19.07 Run Through

Manjaro 18.0.4 Illyria Plasma review - Genius in disguise

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Reviews

Manjaro is a totally bi-polar distro. Utterly genius and silly at the same time. It does some things so well, it offers so much innovation, it has some rather unique features you don't get to see elsewhere, and then it spoils it with some visual inconsistencies, glitches with its bundled apps and very cumbersome package management. No AUR, fine, but what other options do common users have? How can ordinary non-CLI folks enjoy the likes of Chrome or Skype or whatnot on their boxen? There's a lot of progress - just read my Manjaro diaries over the years - but it's still all fragile balance, and the distro still needs to fully figure out its identity and direction.

The nonfree aspect of the live session should be highlighted. All in all, I'm pleased with the easy availability of everyday conveniences, the installer was neat, and there's a lot of original goodness in Manjaro, more than most other distros. But the network support needs some rework, there should be better identification or auto-configuration with hardware issues on so-called unfriendly platform, and the package management feels neglected. All in all, this is a very promising system. Manjaro 18.0.4 Illyria deserves something like 8/10, and I'll be following up with some customization tricks, plus maybe a review of another edition. That would be all for this rather lengthy review.

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Debian Linux 10 'Buster' Places Stability Ahead of Excitement

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Linux
Reviews
Debian

If you are relatively new to using Linux, Debian's design decisions will not pose obstacles to using it. If you insist on speedier application updates, you might spend excessive time grabbing newer versions from .deb repositories that are outside Buster's reach.

Get Debian 10 Buster ISO downloads here.

You will have plenty of time to resolve those issues. The developers have a long slog to the release of Debian 11, aka "Bullseye."

I can only hope that the next Debian upgrade comes a lot closer to hitting an improved bull's-eye that is less boring.

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Sparky Linux 4.11 LXDE

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Reviews

Today we are looking at Sparky 4.11 LXDE. It comes with the LXDE desktop environment which Lubuntu previously used, but it is no longer in development, the last release was two years ago but it is great to still have a supported Linux Distro which is using it.

The main feature, of this release, is that it changed the repository from Debian Stable to Old-Stable, so still, Debian 9 which tells me that they won't keep it going for long, but it will still be supported for 2 years, like Debian 9.

It uses about 300 MB of ram when idling and Linux Kernel 4.9 which is dated but playing with the distro, the apps can be a bit slow to open up the first time but perfectly workable and for old machines or any machine for which you want to use all the system resources for your work and the minimum for your system.

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Direct/video: Sparky Linux 4.11 LXDE Run Through

OpenSUSE Leap 15.1 - A dream come untrue

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Reviews
SUSE

OpenSUSE Leap 15.1 is significantly better than the first edition. It fixes tons of the problems that the previous version had. But then, it still retains lots of problems and introduces some new ones. You get decent media and phone support, but it's not a perfect record. Network support is average, and overall, the hardware compatibility with the 2010 Pavilion machine is meh.

The installer is no longer as awesome as it used to be, the package management is quite broken, and the system wasn't stable enough to be fun and enjoyable, before or after my tweaks. The Plasma desktop is sweet, and while SUSE does have tricks most other distros don't have, like YaST, BTRFS, Snapper and such, it feels raw and jumbled and hastily put together. There were too many rough edges and errors and application crashes for me to consider this for serious work. Alas, my dream of using openSUSE in my production setup was dashed once again. All in all, Leap 15.1 deserves something like 4/10, a far cry from the legend it used to be. Maybe, maybe one day. But hey, at the current rate, 15.2 might be quite all right. We shall see.

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Openwashing by SUSE: Can You Have Open Source without True Partnership?

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Librem 5 August Update

We are preparing everything for the Librem 5 to be delivered soon, and its software will focus on the most critical applications a phone needs: calls, messages and web browsing. There are supporting projects that will be delivered too, like GNOME Settings, the shell, GNOME Initial Setup, and GNOME Contacts. So without further ado, let’s take a tour through the software we will deliver–as well as some other applications that have seen some major changes. Read more

low-memory-monitor: new project announcement

I'll soon be flying to Greece for GUADEC but wanted to mention one of the things I worked on the past couple of weeks: the low-memory-monitor project is off the ground, though not production-ready. low-memory-monitor, as its name implies, monitors the amount of free physical memory on the system and will shoot off signals to interested user-space applications, usually session managers, or sandboxing helpers, when that memory runs low, making it possible for applications to shrink their memory footprints before it's too late either to recover a usable system, or avoid taking a performance hit. It's similar to Android's lowmemorykiller daemon, Facebook's oomd, Endless' psi-monitor, amongst others Read more Also: New Low-Memory-Monitor Project Can Help With Linux's RAM/Responsiveness Problem

IBM: Kubernetes/OpenShift, OpenPOWER, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux for Developers

  • Red Hat Integration delivers new Kubernetes Operators and expands data integration capabilities with latest release

    We are pleased to announce the Q3 release of Red Hat Integration, which brings us further in our alignment around Red Hat OpenShift as the platform of choice for developing and deploying cloud-native applications across hybrid cloud environments, as well as helping customers get their integrations up and running easier and faster. As modern IT continues its rapid evolution, it becomes important that the cloud-native solutions supporting this transformation keep pace, enabling IT organizations to truly benefit from this constant innovation. To help customers take full advantage of this, we've updated, tested and certified every single component in Red Hat Integration with the latest version of OpenShift: Red Hat OpenShift 4.

  • The Linux Foundation Announces New Open Hardware Technologies and Collaboration

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced that the OpenPOWER Foundation will become a project hosted at The Linux Foundation. The project includes IBM’s open POWER Instruction Set Architecture (ISA) and contributed Source Design Implementations required to support data-driven hardware for intensive workloads like Artificial Intelligence (AI). OpenPOWER is the open steward for the Power Architecture and has the support of 350 members, including IBM, Google, Inspur Power Systems, Yadro, Hitachi, Wistron, Mellanox, NVIDIA, and Red Hat. The governance model within the Linux Foundation gives software developers assurance of compatibility while developing AI and hybrid cloud native applications that take advantage of POWER’s rich feature set and open compute hardware and software ecosystems. As the demand rises for more and more compute-intensive workloads like AI and in-memory analytics, commodity systems vendors have struggled with the looming predictions of the end of Moore’s Law. Central processing units (CPUs) may no longer handle the rising demands alone, and data-centric systems are built to maximize the flow of data between CPUs and attached devices for specialized workloads. By hosting OpenPOWER at The Linux Foundation, a cross-project, cross-community collaboration, it will accelerate development of hardware and software to support data-centric systems, by making it available to a growing global audience. “The OpenPOWER community has been doing critical work to support the increasing demands of enterprises that are using big data for AI and machine learning workloads. The move to bring these efforts together with the worldwide ecosystem of open source developers across projects at The Linux Foundation will unleash a new level of innovation by giving developers everywhere more access to the tools and technologies that will define the next generation of POWER architecture,” said Jim Zemlin, executive director at The Linux Foundation.

  • Raptor Computing Systems Planning To Launch New ATX POWER9 Board With OpenCAPI

    In addition to the news out of the OpenPOWER Summit in San Diego that the POWER ISA is going open-source and the OpenPOWER Foundation becoming part of the Linux Foundation, Raptor Computing Systems shared they plan to launch a new standard ATX motherboard next year that will feature OpenCAPI connectivity. Built off the successes of their Talos II high-end server motherboard and lower-cost Blackbird desktop motherboard designs, there is apparently a new motherboard design for POWER9 being worked on that could launch in early 2020.

  • Why you should be developing on Red Hat Enterprise Linux

    With a $0 Red Hat Developer membership, you get access to Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) at no cost. We have downloads available for RHEL versions starting as far back as 7.2, and as current as RHEL 8.1 Beta. The subscription costs nothing, and there are no additional costs for any of the software or content we make available through the program.

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