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Reviews

Arch Linux Review in 2019

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Reviews

In constant development since 2002, Arch Linux isn’t new. It’s built up a large, loyal following of users who love Arch’s “Keep It Simple, Stupid” approach, where minimalism and choice reign supreme.

No Arch Linux installation is the same, and that’s the appeal to Arch users. It isn’t the friendliest Linux distro for beginners, but if you’re looking to truly understand what a Linux distro can do, Arch Linux could be for you.

At number 15 on the Distowatch popularity list over the past 12 months, Arch is also one of the most well-known Linux distros. Let’s find out why this minimalist distro continues to be popular.

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A Simple Review of GNOME 3.34

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GNOME
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That's all for now. As always, I love how simple and beautiful GNOME release announcement was. After testing in 3 days, I immediately like this version more than the previous one for the speed improvement and I hope Ubuntu and other distros adopt it soon. Ah, I forgot, regarding Ubuntu, good news for us: next October's Ubuntu Eoan Ermine will feature 3.34! Regarding GNOME, I don't know if this is coincidence or what, but this year's KDE Plasma is faster and smoother and so is GNOME. I think next GNOME 3.36 will be faster and better as well. Finally I would love to say thank you GNOME developers! You all did well in last 6 month.

How do you think about 3.34? Let me know in the comment section!

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Also: Internet Speed Indicator for GNOME 3.34

Chuwi AeroBook review: Testing 5 Linux distributions

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Linux
Reviews

Chuwi is likely not a brand familiar to many, though the Chinese firm has established its abilities in producing budget-focused notebooks and tablets—essentially, attempting to provide a full Windows experience at a price point of an average Chromebook. Chuwi's upmarket Chuwi Aerobook could be the right price for an Ultrabook form factor at a $500 price point.

Support for Linux on fundamentally consumer hardware has improved considerably over the last decade, largely preventing the need to perform extensive manual configuration. In 2019, minor compatibility issues—tiny papercut-like problems that are harder to actually solve—can pop up for specific hardware configurations. Depending on the return policies of your preferred marketplace, it might be impossible or cost-prohibitive to return a product like this if it doesn't work with Linux.

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BlackWeb 1.2

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Debian

BlackWeb is a penetration and security testing distribution based on Debian. The project's website presents the distribution's features as follows:

BlackWeb is a Linux distribution aimed at advanced penetration testing and security auditing. BlackWeb contains several hundred tools which are geared towards various information security tasks, such as penetration testing, security research, computer forensics and reverse engineering. Starting from an appropriately configured LXDE desktop manager it offers stability and speed. BlackWeb has been designed with the aim of achieving the maximum performance and minimum consumption of resources.

There are 32-bit (x86) and 64-bit (x86_64) builds of BlackWeb available on the distribution's website. I downloaded the 64-bit build which is 2.6GB in size. Booting from the media brings up a menu asking if we would like to try BlackWeb's live desktop, run the installer or run the graphical installer. Taking the live desktop options presents us with a graphical login screen where we can sign in with the username "root" and the password "blackweb".

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EndlessOS | Review from an openSUSE User

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EndlessOS is a distribution of Linux I have been watching from afar and almost dabbled with several times. Unfortunately for me and my biases, I didn’t take the time to get to know this distribution sooner. This is an incredibly interesting project that has been given a lot of time and care with plenty of thought. In no way should Endless ever be confused with a casual passion project. This is a serious, well designed and well thought out distribution of Linux that should be part of any Linux user’s growth in an open source enthusiastenthusiest.

Bottom line up front: Endless OS is a very interesting Linux distribution that has a specific target. I am not that target that I can appreciate. To refer to Endless as a Linux distribution does not do it justice as this is so much more. This is a Linux product. The “offline internet” and especially the Cooking application with the loads and loads of recipes built into it. There has obviously been a lot of thought that went into the user interface as this is incredibly polished. The presentation and holistic thoughtfulness in the user interface is not lost on me at all. The interface and the design intent is quite clear but is clearly not for me. I will stick with my more customizable KDE Plasma with my comfortable, leading-edge base that openSUSE Tumbleweed provides.@endlessglobalBottom line up front: Endless OS is a very interesting Linux distribution that has a specific target. I am not that target that I can appreciate. To refer to Endless as a Linux distribution does not do it justice as this is so much more. This is a Linux product. The “offline internet” and especially the Cooking application with the loads and loads of recipes built into it. There has obviously been a lot of thought that went into the user interface as this is incredibly polished. The presentation and holistic thoughtfulness in the user interface is not lost on me at all. The interface and the design intent is quite clear but is clearly not for me. I will stick with my more customizable KDE Plasma with my comfortable, leading-edge base that openSUSE Tumbleweed provides.

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Archman Linux: Pure Arch With Extra Flair

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Linux
Reviews

The distro's origin is Turkey. That by itself is not an issue, but the reach of the Archman community's language localization seems a bit short.

In numerous documentation and website displays, the use of English is a bit awkward. The flawed English does not seem to be a factor within the operating system itself though. Still, if you are struggling to deal with Arch idiosyncrasies, side-stepping some of the phraseology can add to the frustration.

Distros based on Arch Linux usually are not a good starting choice for newcomers to the Linux operating system. Users need a better handle on how Linux works to use Arch-based distros successfully. Considerable background reading is necessary for things to make sense with minimal frustration.

Arch Linux distros in general are not ideal operating systems for users with little Linux experience. Developers of distros such as Archman Linux are trying to change that reputation. Archman Linux can be a good second OS to use as a tool for learning more about how Linux works.

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Top 10 Best Professional Video Editors in 2019

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Reviews

Video editors are costly software, especially those are more advanced such as Adobe Premiere Pro. However, there are plenty of known/unknown Video Editors available which are totally free of cost and open sourced. Here we list 10 free video editors which might be useful for you and your use case.

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Review: Adélie Linux 1.0 Beta

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Adélie Linux is a young project which was recently added to the DistroWatch waiting list. The project strives for a minimal, clean and portable design that uses free software exclusively. The project's website describes Adélie as follows:
Adélie Linux is a free, libre operating environment based on the Linux kernel. We aim for POSIX compliance, compatibility with a wide variety of computers, and ease of use without sacrificing features, setting us apart from other Linux distributions.
Adélie uses the musl c library instead of the more commonly used GNU C Library. It also uses the classic SysV init software with the OpenRC service manager instead of the widely adopted systemd init suite. Adélie makes use of the APK package manager, which is very light and fast. APK is also used by Alpine Linux, though the two projects do not appear to share any specific code or utilities apart from the package manager. As mentioned above, Adélie's website claims the project uses only libre software. This makes it possible to audit and modify any part of the operating system. Adélie also supports a wide range of CPU architectures, including: PPC, PPC64, ARM64, PMMX (i586), and x86_64. The distribution is available in two builds: Full and Live. Live is smaller and can download packages from the network during the installation. The Full edition includes all required packages, suitable for off-line installs. The Live edition for 64-bit x86_64 is a mere 128MB in size while Full is 321MB. Both are relatively small for a modern OS. I downloaded the Full edition for my trial.

The live media boots to a text console very quickly. Adélie displays login information for the root account and an unprivileged account called "live". Neither of these two accounts are password protected on the live media. When we sign in we are told we can get useful information by installing a handbook package (adelie-handbook) First we need to get on-line though as the network is not connected by default. Once on-line, I could not find any package called adelie-handbook or any package with "handbook" in the name.

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A Comprehensive Intro to Darktable: A Free Lightroom Alternative

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Software
Reviews

Anthony Morganti of IAmMrPhotographer.com recently teamed up with photographer and fellow YouTuber Rico Richardson to produce a comprehensive introduction to the popular (and free) Lightroom alternative Darktable. If you’ve been wanting to try this open source RAW editor but don’t know where to start, this video is for you.

Richardson is an expert in Darktable who’s created many a tutorial for the RAW processing software over on his own channel. This 10 minute tutorial is a bit more broad than all that: a beginner’s guide that starts by showing you how to download the software off the Darktable website, moves into a detailed walkthrough of the user interface and available tools, and finishes off with a quick demonstration of Darktable’s powerful masking features in action.

If you already have Darktable downloaded, skip to the 3:58 mark to jump right into the UI; and if you already understand the import settings in the Lighttable tab, you can skip straight to the tools overview and editing demonstration around 7:20.

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A Dive Inside Cinnamon, an Overlooked Linux Desktop

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Linux
Reviews

Historically, Cinnamon development started after GNOME 3.X came out, a lot of things actually started after GNOME 3 came out in 2011: MATE was forked of GNOME 2 in an effort to keep the traditional desktop layout. Unity started to be developed by Canonical / Ubuntu. Mint developers, on the other hand, introduced a set of GNOME Shell extensions that tried to alter the behaviour of the shell to make it look like a traditional GNOME 2 desktop environment; An effort which seemed impossible to sustain with the API break between each new GNOME version, especially that it was still under heavy development back in the day. In the end, Mint developers forked the entire GNOME Shell stack and called it “Cinnamon”.

Nautilus, the default GNOME file manager was forked into “Nemo”. Mutter, the GNOME Shell’s compositor, was forked into “Muffin”, and a lot of similar libraries and apps were forked too.

Today, 8 years later, Cinnamon is almost nothing like the original GNOME Shell. It’s quite extendable, functional yet beautiful in its own traditional way that do not require you to get used to a new user experience each new version, but instead, just use your PC to do your actual work. Cinnamon 1.0 in terms of the general UI / UX is almost identical to Cinnamon 4.2 released few weeks ago. And the Linux community seems to forget that the silent majority would like such thing.

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