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Reviews

Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Yoga: impressions, bugs, workarounds, and thoughts about the future

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Linux
Reviews

My new laptop arrived last week and I’ve been using it since then! Here are my impressions so far of the Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Yoga (gen 4), and how it compares to my old laptop, a 2016 HP Spectre x360...

I wish I could say that it’s been a pleasant, trouble-free experience and that I’m loving my new computer. In truth, getting the ThinkPad X1 Yoga to function well enough to comfortably write this post took several frustrating days of poring over documentation, filing bug reports, tweaking config files, and altering kernel parameters. On top of that, it’s still not quite there yet and is worse than my old laptop in several ways despite costing twice as much money. The high DPI scaling issues are our fault in KDE, and we need to do better, but that’s just the tip of the iceberg. The problems run throughout the entire software stack. Simply put, this is not acceptable in 2020. We need to up our game of partnering with hardware makers to ship FOSS operating systems by default. Everything I’m going through with this computer is the kind of problem that should be caught by paid Linux QA teams so that it can be fixed before the hardware is released to customers.

I continue to believe that we will get nowhere until more hardware comes with a Linux-based OS pre-installed. People shouldn’t have to deal with this kind of nonsense! My wife has been happily using KDE Neon on her laptop for two years, but I had to do the initial installation. Normal people want their computers to just work, not endlessly fiddle around with settings to make things functional that should have been so out of the box in the first place.

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Pop!_OS Review: Optimized Ubuntu for Creative Professionals

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Pop!_OS 20.04 is a beautiful operating system. It allows you to optimize your workflow with automatic window tiling and has lots of other neat features such as a handy extensions app, an effective application launcher and switcher, and Flatpack package management support. If you choose to install this OS, you will also appreciate the automatic firmware updates and improved graphics support.

Admittedly, you may have to spend some time getting used to the automatic window tiling feature. It is quite useful when you do, however. Optimizing the space that windows take up on your screen is something you may overlook, but it saves you from having to constantly drag around windows.

Overall, this distribution strikes me as one which can help a busy professional manage all of their various tasks efficiently. If you are keen to use the Unity desktop instead of Gnome on Ubuntu, you should also check out UMix.

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Review: KISS 1.9.11

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Linux
Reviews

This past week I had a chance to look at a project I have been hoping to find time to try for a while now, KISS. The project's website describes KISS as follows...

An independent Linux distribution with a focus on simplicity and the concept of less is more. The distribution targets only the x86-64 architecture and the English language.

The KISS project appears to be aiming to create a very minimal operating system with a simple design. One that is transparent and can be both audited and understood relatively easily. The default environment is quite small and minimal in terms of features. Default tools tend to be written in shell scripts rather than binary programs, making it possible for administrators to quickly view and edit the utilities.

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Tails OS – An Actionable Guide for Regular Folks

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One of the great things about Tails is that you can create your own Tails USB Stick or DVD and try it for yourself. And since it is free software, all it will cost you is the USB Stick or DVD you install it on.

In the next few sections, we’ll talk about the process of creating and configuring a Tails System using a USB Stick. We won’t walk you through the process step by step, as the details depend on the type of computer you install from and the media you are going to install to.

We do encourage you to create your own Tails System by following the instructions on the Download and Install Tails page that applies to your situation.

Once we’re done, you’ll be able to see for yourself how Tails and its included software work.

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[Video] What's New in Linux Lite 5.0 OS - Possible Windows replacement

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Reviews

A video walkthrough of Linux Lite 5.0. Have a look.
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Linuxfx 10: A Smart, Easy Way to Transition From Windows

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Linux
Reviews

Linuxfx is a great OS to run on older computers. It does not need very advanced hardware. A dual-core rig with a minimum of 2 GB of RAM is enough to run the system without lags or sluggishness.

However, you will experience far superior performance if your hardware exceeds the minimum requirement. The sweet spot is at least 4 GB RAM and 16 GB of free disk space.

Installation is a no-brainer as well. It is a fairly straightforward process that takes around 5 minutes.

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Review of MODICIA O.S.

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Reviews

When it comes to unpopular distros, people often question reliability as a factor. MODICIA O.S. is not a mainstream distro like RHEL, Debian, or SUSE Linux, etc., but is not backed by any large company. This leads many to believe that off-meta distros are just low-quality “discount” systems that will break apart after some time.

Well, that is not the case with MODICIA O.S. The dev team behind Modicia Web Design and Development has been working to spread Linux since 1998. Devs use it themselves for their multimedia production. The distro is built to meet user demands with ease.

The latest MODICIA O.S. 20.144 is based on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. This gives MODICIA a solid base for stability and community support. As for the desktop environment, it comes with a modified version of Xfce. MODICIA also comes with various tools by default; for example, office-related tools, browsers, and others.

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Zorin OS 15 – An Ultimate Linux Desktop Designed for Windows and macOS Users

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Reviews

In the advent of Linux’s grand entrance into the PC space back in 1993, has been an insurgency of operating systems and that time also happened to be the wake of a technological-oriented generation adopting computers at a much faster pace than ever before.

In the light of this fact, Debian took off grandly (two years after Linux was born) and through it, a staggering 200 independent distributions have poured out – thanks to Ian Murdock.

We can likewise say thanks to Canonical/Ubuntu for driving the concept of user-friendliness and usability for the “normal human” which other distros like Linux Mint et ‘al have perfected over the years to the extent at which it is more than reliable in this day and age.

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Let’s Discover Xubuntu 20.04 With Xfce 4.14; A Review

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One of the most gorgeous flavors of Ubuntu is Xubuntu, which is shipped by default with the Xfce desktop. Xfce is a very practical desktop environment that not only “just works”, but is also beautiful in its own characteristic way.

Xubuntu 20.04 is the first LTS release to ship with Xfce 4.14, making it also the first LTS to fully experience the power of GTK 3 after it was imported from GTK 2 taking around 4 years of continuous work. The amounts of updates between Xubuntu 18.04 and 20.04 is huge.

We’ll take you today in a tour in Xubuntu 20.04, what are its features and what bugs or issues you may face if you consider switching to it.

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Dell XPS 13 and XPS 13 Developer Edition—side-by-side review

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Physically, the only difference between the XPS 13 Developer Edition and the plain-vanilla XPS 13 we'd already tested is the color—where the Windows system had the optional, $50 more-expensive "Alpine White" interior, the Developer Edition system used the standard "Black."

In theory, the outsides are different, too—the Windows machine's exterior was "Frost White" and the Linux machine's is "Platinum Silver." But in most lighting, you'd be hard pressed to tell the two apart without opening them up.

There were some significant hardware differences, as well—you can't buy the regular XPS 13 with more than 16GiB RAM in it, while the XPS 13 Developer Edition can be spec'd up to 32GiB. Our particular XPS 13 DE also had a 4K UHD+ touchscreen, instead of the 1920x200 FHD+ touchscreen on our Windows system—but that, like the color, can be configured the same on either version.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed vs. Leap 15.2 vs. Jump Alpha Benchmarks

Following the recent alpha debut of the openSUSE Jump distribution for testing that is working to synchronize SUSE Linux Enterprise with openSUSE Leap, there was an inquiry made about the performance of it. So for addressing that premium member's question, here are some benchmarks carried out recently of the latest openSUSE Leap 15.2 against the openSUSE Jump in its early state against the rolling-release openSUSE Tumbleweed. Read more

today's howtos

Ubuntu Touch OTA-13 Released With More Phones Supported, UI Improvements

The UBports community has announced the release of Ubuntu Touch OTA-13 as their newest over-the-air update to this Ubuntu mobile operating system. With Ubuntu Touch OTA-13 now supported are the Sony Xperia X/XZ/Performance and OnePlus 3/3T devices. This is on top of around one dozen other devices from the LG Nexus 4/5 to earlier OnePlus devices, FairPhone 2, Nexus 7, and different Meizu and BQ devices from the early days of the Ubuntu Touch effort at Canonical. Read more Direct: Ubuntu Touch OTA-13 release Also: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 649