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Reviews

Review: GoboLinux 017

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OS
Reviews

The GoboLinux project develops a distribution with an unusual goal: reorganizing the operating system's filesystem. The project introduces itself as follows:
GoboLinux is an alternative Linux distribution which redefines the entire filesystem hierarchy. In GoboLinux you don't need a package database because the filesystem is the database: each program resides in its own directory.
In other words, instead of a package manager placing executable files in /usr/bin, libraries in /usr/lib, and other resources in /usr/share, a program's files are all stored in one tree, such as /Programs/Firefox or /Programs/LibreOffice. This way the user, and package utilities, can remove software by deleting a single directory rather than keeping track of where individual files have been installed.

GoboLinux uses the the Awesome window manager, which provides a lightweight graphical interface. Version 017 of Gobo removes Python2 in favour of Python3, and also removes GTK2 for GTK3 on the ISO. Audio management is now handled by PulseAudio.

Gobo makes available one edition of the distribution for 64-bit (x86_64) computers. The download is 1.9GB in size. Booting from this media brings up a series of text-based menus. These menus ask us to select one of six languages from a list, then select our keyboard's layout. With these questions answered we are presented with a text console where we are automatically logged into the root account. A message appears above the command line prompt which lets us know we can run "startx" to open a graphical user interface. The text also explains how to launch the system installer from either the command line or from the Awesome window manager.

Opening the Awesome environment places a panel at the top of the screen. We can find an application menu in the upper-left corner and the system tray in the upper-right. The wallpaper is mostly black with abstract designs drawn on it. The background appears to be dynamically drawn rather than a fixed image. The volume icon is interesting in that clicking on it changes the colour of the icon (toggling between green and red) and this appears to mute audio.

The application menu in the live environment contains very few entries. Most of these manage or adjust the Awesome session. I feel it worth noting that to customize Awesome we need to edit a text file, there isn't any point-and-click settings panel. There is a menu entry to open the Awesome manual. Trying to access the manual caused a window to open for a second, then immediately crash without showing the requested documentation or an error.

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Ubuntu 20.04 Review

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Reviews

Finally, this is my review of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Focal Fossa on its Panorama, Power, and Life for all users divided in three parts after I used it in enough period of time. I go from the point of view of twelve years ago the legendary 8.04 Hardy Heron version and the slogan Just Work we easily find when installing this amazing operating system. Once one part finished, I will update this preface article until all parts finished. I am enjoying writing this and I hope you also enjoy this review series even better. Happy reading!

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Kubuntu 20.04 LTS - Bland but functional

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KDE
Reviews

Kubuntu has been reviewed here before, albeit in a comparison with the Fedora KDE spin in the KDE 4 days. Quite a while I know, and since I happen to like Plasma it's been on the cards to check out a few KDE-centric distributions once again. Kubuntu is one of the oldest official Ubuntu flavours from Canonical and should have become the default desktop offering long ago.

When talking about consistency and predictability for business and enterprise desktops, which is what's needed there, Ubuntu does not exactly look good. What could be less consistent than moving from Gnome 2 to Unity and then again to Gnome Shell in a matter of a few years? For the home user it does not matter much, most of us are jumping from distro to distro and between different environments as we see fit, but in business there's training involved, in particular with non-technical staff who may already have a hard time switching from other operating systems.

With that out of the way, let's begin. Kubuntu 20.04 is distributed as a 64 bit download for the amd/intel architecture only. I opted to get it via torrent as it does the checksum checking for us so we can be sure not to get a corrupted download. Then created the bootable USB stick. Kubuntu is distributed as a hybrid live installable image so we can check it out and test the hardware before committing.

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5 Best Python IDE and Code Editors

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Reviews

We list the 5 best Python code editor for Ubuntu/Linux and Windows in 2020.
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A Complete Look at the PineBook Pro

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GNU
Linux
Hardware
Reviews

For a $200 laptop though, I can’t really complain. The materials that compose this product are of durable quality, the components that make the device work are pretty beefy for the price tag, the keyboard is decent, and you can still do *most* of the things that you’re used to doing on a desktop. I can see the PBP or even the original Pinebook as a valuable resource for those that need computers in third-world countries. You may want to consider getting the PBP if you’re in need of a laptop.

With Apple making the move to make all of their Macs ARM-based as early as this year, the folks at Pine64 may have already set the precedent for us with their Pinebook lineup. There isn’t a doubt in my mind ARM-based devices will become more and more of a common thing within the next decade, and Pine64 is already paving that way for us, before Apple did, with the addition of easy customization, both on the hardware and software side. Thumbs up from me!

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Review: Devuan GNU+Linux 3.0.0

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GNU
Linux
Reviews

Devuan is a Debian-based distribution which removes systemd, along with dependencies on systemd, from the operating system. Devuan uses SysV init software by default and the release notes mention OpenRC is available as an optional service/runlevel manager while runit is in the repositories as an alternative init implementation.

Devuan 3.0.0 is based on Debian 10 and has builds available for the 32-bit (x86), 64-bit (x86_64), armhf, arm64, and ppc64el architectures. The project further makes available Desktop, Server, Minimal, and Net-install editions. We are also offered Live and Install flavours of media for most editions. In other words, Devuan follows Debian's example in having a lot of download options before we even begin the install process.

I thought it worth noting that while Debian's default install media does not include non-free firmware which is often used for wireless networking, and users who require non-free firmware need to download alternative media. In contrast, Devuan's editions all ship with non-free firmware and provide the option of removing it.

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UbuntuDDE | Review from an openSUSE User

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Reviews
SUSE
Ubuntu

UbuntuDDE is a satisfactory Desktop Environment. Would I say it is the most beautiful? No, not a chance. I think it is fine though. What bothers me most about it is the very limiting feeling I get from it. I don’t feel attached to the desktop. I don’t feel like it is mine and things like not all applications respecting the dark theme just added more to that pile.

Despite my experience with the desktop. I think you should give it a try, in a VM or on actual hardware. After all, your experience may be far different than mine. It could be all roses and puppy dogs or maybe Kawaii cats hiding and appearing. After all, I am a biased openSUSE Plasma user that wants his bacon fried to a certain perfection. My tastes are different than yours so you should explore and find your Desktop Home.

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Ubuntu Unity Distro: An Unofficial Desktop Revival

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Perhaps one of the most missed Linux desktop environments is Ubuntu Unity Desktop, developed by Ubuntu’s parent company, Canonical. It was either loved or hated by users otherwise endeared to the vastly popular Ubuntu Linux OS.

But now that it has been replaced by GNOME 3 as Ubuntu’s default desktop environment. An infant cottage industry of sorts has made a smattering of appearances and disappearances with replacement Unity integrations.

The Unity desktop was a radical change from more traditional desktop offerings. Its vertical panel was anchored to the left screen edge. It introduced a totally different graphical user interface at a time when the more standard GNOME 3 desktop was undergoing its own set of design changes.

Canonical introduced Unity some 10 years ago. After Ubuntu 18.04 LTS was released in early 2018, the developer abandoned Unity 7 in favor of the GNOME 3 desktop. That was mostly due to unsolved technical issues in getting the planned Unity 8 to run with the Mir display server with the planned replacement of the X Window System with Wayland for Ubuntu.

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Lubuntu 20.04 Is an Absolute Nightmare of a Linux Distribution

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Linux
Reviews
Ubuntu

So here ends the nightmare of Lubuntu 20.04.

We recommend not even wasting time and downloading this release, as it is full of errors and bugs as you have seen. It would be better to search for some XFCE or MATE powered distributions to try instead of this.

One would have hoped that the bugs we covered in the Lubuntu 19.04 review would be fixed by this release, but sadly, the bugs are increasing and not decreasing.

You can check our reviews for other flavors of Ubuntu 20.04 from this timeline...

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EasyOS 2.3 - The Modern Prometheus Tux

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OS
Reviews

EasyOS looks like a Frankenstein edition of Puppy, in a good way. But as an experimental project, it's also not something you want to inflict on your unsuspecting grandparents. Actually, it's not suitable for the majority of users, including nerds, because it does require a fair deal of manual labor early on. I guess that explains the difficulty in getting the image.

But if you think this happy madness ends there, you be mistaken. There's an even more Frankensteiny creation, and that's EasyPup! So there. Anyway, EasyOS 2.3 looks like a really ambitious and quite unique distro, and largely, it works great. If you're a tinkerer, I'd recommend you grab this and have a thorough go. Otherwise, it's worth waiting until it matures a bit more, the stack gets rock solid, and some of the usability niggles are resolved. All in all, something super cool and worth following. Stay tuned.

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