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Reviews

BlueStar Linux 5.2.1

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Today we are looking at BlueStar Linux 5.2.1. This release of BlueStar is an Arch rolling distro and comes with Linux Kernel 5.2.1 and KDE Plasma 5.16.3 and uses about 700MB of ram when idling.

Bluestar Linux is a beautiful Arch/KDE distro that works great out of the box and is receiving a lot of love from their very active developer.

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Direct/video: BlueStar Linux 5.2.1 Run Through

One Mix 1S Yoga mini laptop Linux test

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Linux
Reviews

I took a loaded up a few different GNU/Linux distributions onto USB flash drives, booted into them (by pressing F7 on the One Mix 1S Yoga at the boot splash screen), and checked to see what works out of the box, and what doesn’t.

Here’s what I found.

Priced at about $440, the One Mix 1S Yoga is one of the most affordable laptops around with a screen size smaller than 7 inches.

But it’s also one of the newest models, and I’m not aware of any custom GNU/Linux distributions optimized for this particular computer yet. The folks behind Ubuntu MATE, for example, offer a custom version of that operating system that’s designed for UMPC (Ultra Mobile PC) computers including the GPD Pocket, GPD Pocket 2, GPD MicroPC, and Topjoy Falcon. But it doesn’t yet seem to support the One Mix 1S Yoga (the operating system loads fine, but some of the display tweaks don’t work).

Still, while the out-of-the-box experience with most Linux-based operating systems I’ve tested so far is imperfect, it’s also promising.

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Review: HexagonOS 1.0

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On the whole, Hexagon worked well for me. Hardware support was solid, performance was above average, the included applications worked well, and the settings were easy to adjust. I had very few complaints - just two really: my keyboard layout had to be adjusted and Hexagon did not automatically work well with VirtualBox. However, both of these issues were easily addressed.

With that being said, Hexagon appears to bring relatively little, technologically, to the experience over its parent. While running this distribution I sometimes forgot that I was not simply running Xubuntu with a dock installed. The custom utilities Hexagon provides (the software centre and the backup tool) both function, but are quite limited in what they can do for the user and this makes me disinclined to use them over other solutions like Deja Dup and GNOME Software.

It's probably too soon to judge what HexagonOS will become. Right now it's just at its 1.0 release, and appears to be a first attempt to take Xubuntu and customize it with a few changes. Hopefully future versions will try more new things, polish the custom applications and distinguish the distribution from its parent.

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ArcoLinux 19.07.11

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Today we are looking at the latest snapshot of ArcoLinux 19.07.11. We are looking at the main, edition, the XFCE release. It is based on Arch Linux, Linux Kernel 5.2, XFCE 4.12 and it uses about 600MB of ram when idling.

When I look at ArcoLinux, I can see just how much the developer loves this project and how much work he is putting into it. AcroLinux is clearly one of the best looking, and working great.

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Direct/video: ArcoLinux 19.07.11 Run Through

Sparky Linux 5.8

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Today we are looking at Sparky Linux 5.8. This point release of Sparky 5 comes with LXQt 0.14.1, Debian Buster, Linux Kernel 4.19 and uses about 350MB of ram when idling.

Sparky Linux LXQt has become one of my favorites, as it has a modern feeling, with the latest of Qt and the stability of Debian, makes it one great combination. Enjoy!

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Direct/video: Sparky Linux 5.8 Run Through

Under an hour ago:

  • What?s next Sparky?

    As before, after releasing a new stable version of Sparky, there are a few changes to do.

    So…

    Sparky 4 “Tyche” is moved to oldstable line now.
    The latest 4.11 release is the last one of the 4 line, but it is still supported, the next 2 years about.

    Sparky 5 “Nibiru” just released, moving it from testing to stable line.
    The stable live/install media are available for i686, amd64 & armhf archs (the same as the older release).

Deepin 15.11

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Reviews
Debian

Today we are looking at Deepin 15.11. Deepin 15.11 is a fantastic release of Deepin, I couldn't find any faults and it just feels so much more stable, with Debian Buster and Kwin Window Manager.

One, of the newest features, which I noticed, I guess there will be mixed emotions is that they have now an optional built-in cloud service, currently only available in China, I don't know how secure it will be and exactly what it's purpose will be.

Another thing which I noticed is, that Deepin Driver Manager comes now pre-installed and their version of Crossover is upgraded to Crossover 18, available in the Software Center.

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Direct/video: Deepin 15.11 Run Through

Neon: A Wannabe Linux Distro For KDE Lovers

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KDE
Reviews

KDE Neon is a bit of an oddball Linux thing. Linuxland has an impressive collection of oddball things.

Neon looks and feels much like a Linux distribution, but its developers assert quite openly on their website that Neon is not a real Linux distro. It just installs and functions like one -- sort of.

That can make deciding to use it a little confusing. Neon appears to be a Linux operating system. It boots your computer. It displays a full desktop environment. It runs *some* applications so you can go about your computing tasks much like using any other -- ahh -- real Linux distribution.

That last part is a clue to what makes KDE Neon different.

Getting somewhat technical for a minute, KDE Neon is more of a specialty offering than a fully endowed operating system. Other distros support a wide range of applications from the same software format type.

For example, Ubuntu runs .Deb formatted packages from the Debian Linux family. All .Deb packages will run on Ubuntu- and other Debian-based distros. Which desktop environment is used does not matter, be it KDE, Xfce, GNOME or whatever.

Ditto for RPM-based Linux distributions, like Fedora and Red Hat. All you need is a package management tool or knowledge of the commands for apt, yum or pacman, depending on the distribution's Linux family. However, that is a skill set that lots of Linux users never had to learn.

Not so with KDE Neon. Neon runs only a specific category of KDE applications: the latest. Neon's developers assert that their "pseudo" distro does not support most other software. In fact, non-KDE packages most likely will not even install on Neon.

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Feren OS Next 19.07 Beta

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Today we are looking at Feren OS Next 19.07 Beta. Feren OS Next is Feren's distro in development, a work in progress, but it is improving a lot and this is a major release for this distro, as it is now called Beta.

It is based on Ubuntu 18.04.2, uses Linux Kernel 4.18 and KDE Plasma 5.16.3. It uses about 700MB of ram when idling.

Since the last point release, its highly customized features have been stabilized, not perfect yet as expected, and new features and graphical art has been added. It is truly becoming a beautiful and unique KDE Plasma distro.

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Original/video: Feren OS Next 19.07 Beta Run Through

Endeavour OS 2019.07.15

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Today we are looking at the first stable release of Endeavour OS. It is a project that started to continue the spirit of the recently discontinued Antergos. The developing team exists out of Antergos developers and community members.

As you can see in this first stable release, it is far from just a continuing of Antergos as we know it. The stable release is an offline Calamres installer and it just came with a customized XFCE desktop environment. They are planning to have an online installer again in the future, which will give a person an option to choose between 10 desktop environments, similar to Antergos.

It is based on Arch, Linux Kernel 5.2, XFCE 4.14 pre2 and it uses about 500mb of ram.

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Direct/video: Endeavour OS 2019.07.15 Run Through

Feren OS 19.07

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Today we are looking at Feren OS 19.07. It is based on Linux Mint 19.1, so indirectly Ubuntu 18.04, which is supported until April 2023. It comes with Cinnamon and Nemo 4.0 and Linux Kernel 4.15. It uses about 1GB of ram when idling.

Feren Os is a highly customized version of Linux Mint, which is semi-rolling, it is as rolling as a Ubuntu LTS distro can be, yet it is a very stable and reliable, as well as beautiful and by each release just getting better and better.

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Direct/video: Feren OS 19.07 Run Through

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