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Mesa 20.0 Released

  • mesa 20.0.0
    Hi list,
    
    I'd like to announce mesa 20.0.0 as available for download immediately. I'm very
    pleased that we could get all of the issues blocking the release nailed down
    quickly and make a release on time for once!
    
    This is a .0 release, and you may want to continue to to track 19.3.x until
    20.0.1 comes out in two weeks. 19.3.5 is planned to be the final 19.3 release
    and is planned for next Wednesday.
    
    Dylan
    
    Shortlog
    ========
    
    Alyssa Rosenzweig (3):
          pan/midgard: Fix missing prefixes
          pan/midgard: Don't crash with constants on unknown ops
          pan/midgard: Use fprintf instead of printf for constants
    
    Danylo Piliaiev (1):
          st/nir: Unify inputs_read/outputs_written before serializing NIR
    
    Dylan Baker (6):
          .pick_status.json: Update to 2a98cf3b2ecea43cea148df7f77d2abadfd1c9db
          .pick_status.json: Update to 946eacbafb47c8b94d47e7c9d2a8b02fff5a22fa
          .pick_status.json: Update to bee5c9b0dc13dbae0ccf124124eaccebf7f2a435
          Docs: Add 20.0.0 release notes
          docs: Empty new_features.txt
          VERSION: bump for 20.0.0 release
    
    Erik Faye-Lund (1):
          Revert "nir: Add a couple trivial abs optimizations"
    
    Francisco Jerez (6):
          intel/fs/cse: Make HALT instruction act as CSE barrier.
          intel/fs/gen7: Fix fs_inst::flags_written() for SHADER_OPCODE_FIND_LIVE_CHANNEL.
          intel/fs: Add virtual instruction to load mask of live channels into flag register.
          intel/fs/gen12: Workaround unwanted SEND execution due to broken NoMask control flow.
          intel/fs/gen12: Fixup/simplify SWSB annotations of SIMD32 scratch writes.
          intel/fs/gen12: Workaround data coherency issues due to broken NoMask control flow.
    
    Krzysztof Raszkowski (1):
          gallium/swr: simplify environmental variabled expansion code
    
    Marek Olšák (1):
          radeonsi: don't wait for shader compilation to finish when destroying a context
    
    Mathias Fröhlich (1):
          egl: Implement getImage/putImage on pbuffer swrast.
    
    Peng Huang (1):
          radeonsi: make si_fence_server_signal flush pipe without work
    
    Pierre-Eric Pelloux-Prayer (1):
          radeonsi/ngg: add VGT_FLUSH when enabling fast launch
    
    Tapani Pälli (2):
          glsl: fix a memory leak with resource_set
          iris: fix aux buf map failure in 32bits app on Android
    
    Thong Thai (1):
          Revert "st/va: Convert interlaced NV12 to progressive"
    
    Timothy Arceri (1):
          glsl: fix gl_nir_set_uniform_initializers() for image arrays
    
    luc (1):
          zink: confused compilation macro usage for zink in target helpers.
    
    
    
    git tag: mesa-20.0.0
    
  • Mesa 20.0 Released With Big Improvements For Intel, AMD Radeon Vulkan/OpenGL

    The Mesa 20.0 release switches to the new Intel OpenGL driver default, Vulkan 1.2 support for both AMD Radeon and Intel drivers, the RadeonSI OpenGL driver now has GL 4.6 compliance as part of switching to NIR, the Valve-backed ACO code-path for RADV is in much better shape, and many other improvements. See our Mesa 20.0 feature overview to learn about this big update.

  • Mesa 20.0 Is Imminent With New Intel OpenGL Default, Intel + RADV Vulkan 1.2, OpenGL 4.6 For RadeonSI

    With the release of Mesa 20.0 being imminent, here is a look at all of the new features for this first quarter update to the Mesa 3D stack for open-source OpenGL/Vulkan drivers. Highlights of the soon-to-be-out Mesa 20.0 are outlined below. Mesa 20.0 will be out as soon as today / this week unless delays happen over lingering bugs. - This is the first Mesa release where for those with Broadwell (Gen8) Intel graphics or newer the Intel Gallium3D driver is the new default for OpenGL support. This Intel Gallium3D driver is faster and in better shape than the i965 classic driver. That older OpenGL driver will stick around for supporting Haswell graphics and prior generations.

  • RADV Driver Adds VK_EXT_line_rasterization In Preparing For Eventual Vulkan CAD Apps

    Added to the Vulkan API last summer was VK_EXT_line_rasterization for line rasterization like employed by CAD applications. The open-source Mesa Radeon Vulkan "RADV" driver is now supporting this extension.

Antitrust Laws and Open Collaboration

If you participate in standards development organizations, open source foundations, trade associations, or the like (Organizations), you already know that you’re required to comply with antitrust laws. The risks of noncompliance are not theoretical – violations can result in severe criminal and civil penalties, both for your organization and the individuals involved. The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) has in fact opened investigations into several standards organizations in recent years. Maybe you’ve had a training session at your company, or at least are aware that there’s an antitrust policy you’re supposed to read and comply with. But what if you’re a working group chair, or even an executive director, and therefore responsible for actually making sure nothing happens that’s not supposed to? Beyond paying attention, posting or reviewing an antitrust statement at meetings, and perhaps calling your attorney when member discussions drift into grey zones, what do you actually do to keep antitrust risk in check? Well, the good news is that regulators recognize that standards and other collaboration deliverables are good for consumers. The challenge is knowing where the boundaries of appropriate conduct can be found, whether you’re hosting, leading or just participating in activity involving competitors. Once you know the rules, you can forge ahead, expecting to navigate those risks, and knowing the benefits of collaboration can be powerful and procompetitive. We don’t often get glimpses into the specific criteria regulators use to evaluate potential antitrust violations, particularly as applicable to collaborative organizations. But when we do, it can help consortia and other collaborative foundations focus their efforts and take concrete steps to ensure compliance. In July 2019, the DOJ Antitrust Division (Division) provided a new glimpse, in its Evaluation of Corporate Compliance Programs in Criminal Antitrust Investigations (Guidance). Although the Guidance is specifically intended to assist Division prosecutors evaluating corporate compliance programs when charging and sentencing, it provides valuable insights for building or improving an Organization’s antitrust compliance program (Program). At a high level, the Guidance suggests that an effective Program will be one that is well designed, is applied earnestly and in good faith by management, and includes adequate procedures to maximize effectiveness through efficiency, leadership, training, education, information and due diligence. This is important because organizations that detect violations and self-report to the Division’s Corporate Leniency program may receive credit (e.g. lower charges or penalties) for having an effective antitrust compliance program in place. Read more

today's howtos

Events: SUSECON, OpenShift Troubleshooting Workshop and Kubernetes Contributor Summit Amsterdam

  • Get Expert Guided Hands-On Experience at the SUSECON 2020 Pre-Conference Workshops

    Are you ready for SUSECON 2020? It’s coming up fast! Join us in Dublin Ireland from March 23 – 27 for a week packed with learning and networking.

  • Get Certified During SUSECON 2020

    Working in IT is not for the feint of heart; the work is demanding, and change is constant. Right now, your organization is undoubtedly seeking new ways to extend the value of their investment in IT and get more done faster.

  • The OpenShift Troubleshooting Workshop

    The first workshop in our Customer Empathy Workshop series was held October 28, 2019 during the AI/ML (Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning) OpenShift Commons event in San Francisco. We collaborated with 5 Red Hat OpenShift customers for 2 hours on the topic of troubleshooting. We learned about the challenges faced by operations and development teams in the field and together brainstormed ways to reduce blockers and increase efficiency for users. The open source spirit was very much alive in this workshop. We came together with customers to work as a team so that we can better understand their unique challenges with troubleshooting. Here are some highlights from the experience.

  • [Kubernetes] Contributor Summit Amsterdam Schedule Announced