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Tuesday, 15 Oct 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Daniel Stenberg: Me, curl and Dagens Nyheter

Filed under
OSS
Web

In the afternoon of October 1st 2019, I had the pleasure of welcoming Linus Larsson and Jonas Lindkvist into my home in Huddinge, south of Stockholm, Sweden. My home is also my office as I work full-time from home. These two fine gentlemen work for Sweden’s largest morning newspaper, Dagens Nyheter, which boasts 850,000 daily readers.

Jonas took what felt like a hundred photos of me, most of them when I sit in my office chair at my regular desk where my primary development computers and environment are. As you can see in the two photos on this blog post. I will admit that I did minimize most of my regular Windows from the screens to that I would accidentally reveal something personal or sensitive, but the plus side is that if you pay close attention you can see my Simon Stålenhag desktop backgrounds better!

Me and Linus then sat down and talked. We talked about my background, how curl was created and how it has “taken off” to an extent I of course could never even dream about. Today, I estimate that curl runs in perhaps ten billion installations. A truly mind boggling – and humbling – number.

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Programming: Python, Perl and More

Filed under
Development
  • Uploading Files to AWS S3 with Python and Django

    In the quest to build more interactive websites, we don't only relay information to users but also allow them to upload data of their own. This opens up more opportunities and more ways that our websites can serve the end-users.

    By allowing users to upload files, we can allow them to share photographs, videos, or music with others or back them up for safekeeping. We can also provide the functionality to manage files and convert them into other formats through websites instead of installing native apps.

    The rise of social media globally can be attributed to the ability of users to upload their files, mostly in the form of images and videos for other users to see and also as a means of communication. By enabling users to upload files to websites and platforms, means of communication have been enhanced and information can now be spread in very many different formats.

    In this post, we will explore how Django handles file uploading and how we can tap into and extend this functionality with cloud storage to suit our needs.

  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #390 (Oct. 15, 2019)
  • The Python range() Function

    Python’s built-in range function is handy when you need to perform an action a specific number of times. As an experienced Pythonista, you’ve most likely used it before. But what does it do?

  • Perl 6 renamed to Raku

    The pull request changing the name of Perl 6 to Raku has been merged. See the full text for more information. "This document describes the steps to be taken to effectuate a rename of 'Perl 6' to 'Raku', as described in issue #81. It does not pretend to be complete in scope or in time. To change a name of a project that has been running for 19+ years will take time, a lot of effort and a lot of cooperation. It will affect people in foreseen and unforeseen ways."

  • Top three mistakes with K-Means Clustering during data analysis

    In this post, we will take a look at a few cases, where KMC algorithm does not perform well or may produce unintuitive results.

  • Agile project management: 10 mistakes to avoid

    Agile project management holds a lot of promise for leaders. Those who have successfully made the switch in their organizations sing agile’s praises, like the ability to rapidly course-correct, release software faster, and create happier teams and customers. But if you’ve been working at it for a while and you still aren’t seeing the promised benefits, you might start to think that agile is more hype than substance, or that it isn’t right for your organization.

Coming up on October 21: First Bug Hunting Session for LibreOffice 6.4!

Filed under
Development
LibO

LibreOffice 6.4 is being developed by our worldwide community, and is due to be released in early February 2020 – see the release notes describing the new features here. Of course, we’re still early in the development cycle, so many more features are still to come!

In order to find, report and triage bugs, the LibreOffice QA team is organizing the first Bug Hunting Session for LibreOffice 6.4 on Monday October 21, 2019. Tests will be performed on the first Alpha version, which will be available on the pre-releases server a few days before the event. Builds will be available for Linux (DEB and RPM), macOS and Windows, and can be installed and run in parallel along with the production version.

Mentors will be available from 07:00 UTC to 19:00 UTC for questions or help in the IRC channel #libreoffice-qa and the Telegram QA Channel. Of course, hunting bugs will be possible also on other days, as the builds of this particular Alpha release (LibreOffice 6.4.0 Alpha 1) will be available until mid November. Check the Release Plan.

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Also: Microsoft Office for free? Try these great alternatives

Canonical/Ubuntu: Design and Web Team, Ubuntu ZFS Support, Weekly Newsletter

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Design and Web team summary – 11 October 2019

    This was a fairly busy two weeks for the Web & design team at Canonical. This cycle we had two sprints. The first was a web performance workshop run by the amazing Harry Roberts. It was a whirlwind two days where we learned a lot about networking, browsers, font loading and more. We also spent a day working on implementing a lot of the changes. Hopefully our sites will feel a bit faster. More updates will be coming over the next few months. The second sprint was for the Brand and Web team, where we looked at where the Canonical and Ubuntu brands need to evolve. Here are some of the highlights of our completed work.

  • Ubuntu ZFS support in 19.10: ZFS on root

    This is part 2 of our blog post series on our current and future work around ZFS on root support in ubuntu. If you didn’t yet read the introductory post, I strongly recommend you to do this first!

    Here we are going to discuss what landed by default ubuntu 19.10.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 600

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 600 for the week of October 6 – 12, 2019.

Audiocasts/Shows/Screencasts: Linux Headlines, ArcoLinux 19.10.1 Run Through and More

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • 2019-10-15 | Linux Headlines

    A double dose of Python, AWS credits for open source projects, a new kernel development course from the Linux Foundation, and an exciting release for KDE Plasma.

  • A Chat with Allan Jude | Jupiter Extras 22

    Brent sits down for an in-person chat with Allan Jude for a retrospective storytelling of his beginnings in BSD, his long history with podcasting, BSDNow and Jupiter Broadcasting, a beginner's guide to the benefits of FreeBSD, with technical nuggets and nostalgic bits throughout.

    Allan Jude wears many hats including FreeBSD developer and member of the FreeBSD Core team, ZFS expert, co-founder and VP Engineering at Klara Inc., co-founder and VP Operations at ScaleEngine Inc., host of BSDNow, former host of TechSNAP among many others.

  • Podcast.__init__: Andrew's Adventures In Coderland

    Software development is a unique profession in many ways, and it has given rise to its own subculture due to the unique sets of challenges that face developers. Andrew Smith is an author who is working on a book to share his experiences learning to program, and understand the impact that software is having on our world. In this episode he shares his thoughts on programmer culture, his experiences with Python and other language communities, and how learning to code has changed his views on the world. It was interesting getting an anthropological perspective from a relative newcomer to the world of software.

    [...]

    Software development is a unique profession in many ways, and it has given rise to its own subculture due to the unique sets of challenges that face developers. Andrew Smith is an author who is working on a book to share his experiences learning to program, and understand the impact that software is having on our world. In this episode he shares his thoughts on programmer culture, his experiences with Python and other language communities, and how learning to code has changed his views on the world. It was interesting getting an anthropological perspective from a relative newcomer to the world of software.

  • 2019-10-14 | Linux Headlines

    Perl 6 is renamed, AWS goes metal with ARM, OnionShare just got a big upgrade, and Google has a new security dongle.

  • ArcoLinux 19.10.1 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at ArcoLinux 19.10.1. Enjoy!

Red Hat: Red Hat Summit 2019, CFO Fired, Fedora 32, Dependency Analytics and Awards

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Top 10 highlights at Red Hat Summit 2019

    As we careen into Fall, we at Red Hat have had a few months to catch our breath after another fantastic Red Hat Summit. Which means… we're busy planning for next year's Red Hat Summit. As we get everything lined up for next year, let's take a look back at some of the highlights from our time in Boston.

    [...]

    Every year the Red Hat Innovation Awards recognize the technological achievements of Red Hat customers around the world who demonstrate creative thinking, determined problem-solving and transformative uses of Red Hat technology.

    The 2019 winners were: BP, Deutsche Bank, Emirates NBD, HCA Healthcare and Kohl's. In addition, HCA Healthcare was voted the 2019 Red Hat Innovator of the Year for its efforts to use data and technology to support modern healthcare. A cross-functional team of clinicians, data scientists and technology professionals at HCA Healthcare used Red Hat solutions to create a real-time predictive analytics product system to more accurately and rapidly detect sepsis, a potentially life-threatening condition.

  • Red Hat Sacks CFO Over Alleged Workplace Standards Violation

    Red Hat CFO has been shown the door in alleged workplace standards violation.

  • Red Hat Developers Eyeing CPU Thermal Management Improvements For Fedora 32

    Several Red Hat developers are looking at improving the CPU thermal management capabilities for Fedora Workstation 32 and in turn possibly helping Intel CPUs reach better performance.

    The change being sought for Fedora Workstation 32 would be shipping Intel's thermal daemon (thermald) by default with Fedora 32 and with that carrying various hardware specific configuration data for helping CPUs reach their optimal thermal/power limits. Intel's open-source thermal daemon can already be installed on most Linux distributions as a separate package but isn't normally shipped by default. With Fedora Workstation 32 it could be shipped by default for its goal of trying to keep CPUs operating in the correct temperature envelop and to reach maximum performance.

  • What’s new in Red Hat Dependency Analytics

    We are excited to announce a new release of Red Hat Dependency Analytics, a solution that enables developers to create better applications by evaluating and adding high-quality open source components, directly from their IDE.

    Red Hat Dependency Analytics helps your development team avoid security and licensing issues when building your applications. It plugs into the developer’s IDE, automatically analyzes your software composition, and provides recommendations to address security holes and licensing problems that your team may be missing.

    Without further ado, let’s jump into the new capabilities offered in this release. This release includes a new version of the IDE plugin and the server-side analysis service hosted by Red Hat.

  • Awards roll call: Red Hat awards, July 2019 - October 2019

    As we head into the new season, we?d like to spread the excitement by sharing some of our latest awards and industry recognition. Since our last roundup, Red Hat has been honored with accolades highlighting our unique culture, our creative and design work and our expansive product portfolio.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Proprietary Software Security and FOSS Patches

Filed under
Security
  • Compromised AWS API Key Allowed Access to Imperva Customer Data

    Imperva has shared more information on how [attackers] managed to obtain information on Cloud Web Application Firewall (WAF) customers, and revealed that the incident involved a compromised administrative API key.

  • Oil Refiner Reports Major IT Incident in Finland

    It’s not yet clear whether the cause is a malfunction or a cyber attack, according to spokeswoman Susanna Sieppi. The issue is under investigation, and it’s too early to estimate when the systems will be fixed, she said by phone.

  • WordPress 5.2.4 Security Release

    WordPress 5.2.4 is now available! This security release fixes 6 security issues.

    WordPress versions 5.2.3 and earlier are affected by these bugs, which are fixed in version 5.2.4. Updated versions of WordPress 5.1 and earlier are also available for any users who have not yet updated to 5.2.

  • Ubuntu Releases Patch for Major ‘sudo’ Security Exploit

    Canonical has issued an urgent security fix to the ‘sudo’ package in the Ubuntu archives following the discovery of a major security flaw.

    A critical fix has rolled out to all users of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, 18.04 LTS, 19.04 and 19.10 (and one assumes Ubuntu 14.04 ESR too) — just run a sudo apt upgrade to install it.

    But what about the flaw inquisition? Well, if you’re yet to hear about it I appreciate meditative disconnect from social media. The oft toxic waste pools of chatter were with wet with alarm — some manufactured, the rest well weighted — over CVE-2019-14287 when it was announced yesterday, October 14.

  • Security updates for Tuesday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (sudo and xtrlock), openSUSE (sudo), Red Hat (Single Sign-On), Slackware (sudo), SUSE (binutils, dhcp, ffmpeg, kernel, kubernetes-salt, sudo, and tcpdump), and Ubuntu (sudo).

Linux security hole: Much sudo about nothing

Filed under
Linux
Security

There's a lot of hubbub out there now about a security hole in the Unix/Linux family's sudo command. Sudo is the command, which enables normal users to run commands as if they were the root user, aka the system administrator. While this sudo security vulnerability is a real problem and needs patching, it's not nearly as bad as some people make it out to be.

At first glance the problem looks like a bad one. With it, a user who is allowed to use sudo to run commands as any other user, except root, can still use it to run root commands. For this to happen, several things must be set up just wrong.

First the sudo user group must give a user the right to use sudo but doesn't give the privilege of using it to run root commands. That can happen when you want a user to have the right to run specific commands that they wouldn't normally be able to use. Next, sudo must be configured to allow a user to run commands as an arbitrary user via the ALL keyword in a Runas specification.

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Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) Enters Final Freeze Ahead of October 17th Release

Filed under
Ubuntu

As of October 10th, the Ubuntu 19.10 release is officially in Final Freeze, the last step of its development stage, which means that only release critical bugs affecting the ISO images or the installers will be accepted in the archives. Release Candidate images are also now available for testing to ensure an uneventful and smooth release.

"We will shut down cronjobs and spin some RC images late Friday or early Saturday once the archive and proposed-migration have settled a bit, and we expect everyone with a vested interest in a flavour (or two) and a few spare hours here and there to get to testing to make sure we have another uneventful release next week," said Adam Conrad.

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KDE neon 5.17

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux

KDE neon 5.17 is out. You can upgrade your existing KDE neon User Edition install or install fresh from an ISO image or run the Docker image. Featuring Plasma 5.17 it is packed full of new features according to OMG Ubuntu.

Read more

Games: The Universim, POSTAL 4: No Regerts, RPCS3, Shadow of the Tomb Raider, Games Archive and X-Plane

Filed under
Gaming
  • City building god sim 'The Universim' will now let you launch rockets with satellites into orbit

    The Universim is slowly turning into a city building god game truly worth playing, with the Sky High update now available expanding the game into planetary orbit.

    Being able to actually launch things into space is a stepping stone towards visiting other planets. Currently, the Cosmodrome will allow you to send up Defence Satellites that will enable ground to air defences for your Defence Towers. So now you have a reasonable chance to take down meteors and other threats from space.

  • POSTAL 4: No Regerts released into Early Access, Linux version likely in future

    Running With Scissors are back, with a surprise release of POSTAL 4: No Regerts on Steam and a Linux version is looking likely in future.

    Naturally, someone posted on Steam to ask about the possibility of Linux support. This is something that happens a lot but here it's a bit different. RWS already supported Linux with multiple previous Postal releases.

  • PlayStation 3 emulator RPCS3 is coming along quickly with their August progress report up

    Delayed as usual due to the progress reports being done by contributors, the team working on the PlayStation 3 emulator RPCS3 have another post up to show off more incredible progress.

    To start with, they have again changed how they list what games are playable and not with the removal of games that won't work due to servers being shut down. They said even if RPCS3 becomes 100% complete, they wouldn't work unless someone accurately emulated and hosted servers for them. With that in mind, they also did a lot of testing of games that previously only went in-game to see how many are now properly playable. Thanks to all the testing, the Playable category has jumped up to 1,426 titles!

  • Shadow of the Tomb Raider Definitive Edition arrives on Linux on November 5th

    Feral Interactive have finally confirmed the Linux release date for Shadow of the Tomb Raider after announcing it for Linux back in November last year.

    They've said today it will officially release as "Shadow of the Tomb Raider Definitive Edition" on November 5th! Looking around at dates, technically this is the earliest we've seen any of the newer Tomb Raider series arrive on Linux. The first Tomb Raider came to Linux in 2016 after an original 2013 release, with Rise of the Tomb Raider arriving on Linux 2018 after an original 2016 release and we get the final game in the reboot trilogy next month!

  • The Internet Archive website has added another 2,500 MS-DOS games

    Another point scored for game preservation. The Internet Archive have added another 2,500 MS-DOS games you can play right in your browser.

    In their official announcement, they said that while they've added a few more to their collection here and there this is the biggest yet and it ranges from "tiny recent independent productions to long-forgotten big-name releases from decades ago".

  • 2,500 More MS-DOS Games Playable at the Archive

    Another few thousand DOS Games are playable at the Internet Archive! Since our initial announcement in 2015, we’ve added occasional new games here and there to the collection, but this will be our biggest update yet, ranging from tiny recent independent productions to long-forgotten big-name releases from decades ago.

  • Vulkan support is not far away now for the flight sim X-Plane 11, physics & flight model updates coming

    X-Plane 11, the detailed flight simulator is finally closing in on an update that will bring in Vulkan support as detailed in a new developer blog post.

7 Linux Applications You Should Start Using Right Now

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

Linux used to be the go-to operating system among the tech-savvy crowd. Because back in the day, it was a lot more demanding to use. Now Linux has modern, user-friendly distributions such as Ubuntu and Mint. The application repository they have in common has matured too. Customizing it to your heart’s desire is now easier than ever before. And this should be the end goal — to mold the OS into a tool that’s custom-tailored to your needs. So if you haven’t already, consider installing the following types of applications.

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Firefox’s New WebSocket Inspector

Filed under
Moz/FF

The Firefox DevTools team and our contributors were hard at work over the summer, getting Firefox 70 jam-packed with improvements. We are especially excited about our new WebSocket inspection feature, because you told us in feedback how important it would be for your daily work.

To use the inspector now, download Firefox Developer Edition, open DevTools’ Network panel to find the Messages tab. Then, keep reading to learn more about WebSockets and the tricks that the new panel has up its sleeve.

But first, big thanks to Heng Yeow Tan, the Google Summer of Code (GSoC) student who’s responsible for the implementation.

Read more

Windows 10 vs. Linux OpenGL/Vulkan Driver Performance With Intel Icelake Iris Plus Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

With picking up the Dell XPS 7390 with Intel Core i7-1065G7 for being able to deliver timely benchmarks from Intel's long-awaited 10nm+ Icelake generation, one of the first areas we have been testing is the Iris Plus "Gen 11" graphics performance. In this article are our initial Windows 10 vs. Linux graphics performance numbers for Ice Lake.

For this very first Intel Iris Plus Gen11 graphics testing are results from Windows 10 compared to Ubuntu 19.10. Ubuntu Linux was benchmarked with its stock driver stack comprised of Mesa 19.2.1 as well as opting for the "Iris" Gallium3D driver and also testing Mesa 19.3-devel both with the default i965 OpenGL driver and the Iris Gallium3D driver. Of course, for the Vulkan tests on Linux is their sole "ANV" Vulkan driver.

The Dell XPS 7390 was equipped with the Intel Core i7-1065G7 Ice Lake processor and its Iris Plus Graphics, 2 x 8GB LPDDR4 3733MHz memory, 500GB Toshiba NVMe solid-state drive, and 1920x1200 panel.

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Coffee Lake embedded PC has six USB 3.0 ports and GbE with BMC

Filed under
Linux

Trenton Systems is prepping a compact, Linux-friendly “Ion Mini PC” with 8th or 9th Gen Coffee Lake options and up to 32GB DDR4, SATA, DP, 6x USB 3.0, and 3x GbE, including one BMC-linked port for out-of-band, remote management.

Trenton Systems has released a photo and preliminary documentation for an Ion Mini PC due to begin sampling by the end of the month. Although this Mini-ITX-based, 178 x 173 x 36mm system is a bit larger than what we typically consider to be a mini-PC these days, it packs in a lot of features including 6x USB 3.0 ports and a Gigabit Ethernet port linked to a Baseboard Management Controller (BMC) chip for remote, out-of-band management of networking connections.

Read more

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android
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More in Tux Machines

Canonical/Ubuntu: Design and Web Team, Ubuntu ZFS Support, Weekly Newsletter

  • Design and Web team summary – 11 October 2019

    This was a fairly busy two weeks for the Web & design team at Canonical. This cycle we had two sprints. The first was a web performance workshop run by the amazing Harry Roberts. It was a whirlwind two days where we learned a lot about networking, browsers, font loading and more. We also spent a day working on implementing a lot of the changes. Hopefully our sites will feel a bit faster. More updates will be coming over the next few months. The second sprint was for the Brand and Web team, where we looked at where the Canonical and Ubuntu brands need to evolve. Here are some of the highlights of our completed work.

  • Ubuntu ZFS support in 19.10: ZFS on root

    This is part 2 of our blog post series on our current and future work around ZFS on root support in ubuntu. If you didn’t yet read the introductory post, I strongly recommend you to do this first! Here we are going to discuss what landed by default ubuntu 19.10.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 600

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 600 for the week of October 6 – 12, 2019.

Audiocasts/Shows/Screencasts: Linux Headlines, ArcoLinux 19.10.1 Run Through and More

  • 2019-10-15 | Linux Headlines

    A double dose of Python, AWS credits for open source projects, a new kernel development course from the Linux Foundation, and an exciting release for KDE Plasma.

  • A Chat with Allan Jude | Jupiter Extras 22

    Brent sits down for an in-person chat with Allan Jude for a retrospective storytelling of his beginnings in BSD, his long history with podcasting, BSDNow and Jupiter Broadcasting, a beginner's guide to the benefits of FreeBSD, with technical nuggets and nostalgic bits throughout. Allan Jude wears many hats including FreeBSD developer and member of the FreeBSD Core team, ZFS expert, co-founder and VP Engineering at Klara Inc., co-founder and VP Operations at ScaleEngine Inc., host of BSDNow, former host of TechSNAP among many others.

  • Podcast.__init__: Andrew's Adventures In Coderland

    Software development is a unique profession in many ways, and it has given rise to its own subculture due to the unique sets of challenges that face developers. Andrew Smith is an author who is working on a book to share his experiences learning to program, and understand the impact that software is having on our world. In this episode he shares his thoughts on programmer culture, his experiences with Python and other language communities, and how learning to code has changed his views on the world. It was interesting getting an anthropological perspective from a relative newcomer to the world of software. [...] Software development is a unique profession in many ways, and it has given rise to its own subculture due to the unique sets of challenges that face developers. Andrew Smith is an author who is working on a book to share his experiences learning to program, and understand the impact that software is having on our world. In this episode he shares his thoughts on programmer culture, his experiences with Python and other language communities, and how learning to code has changed his views on the world. It was interesting getting an anthropological perspective from a relative newcomer to the world of software.

  • 2019-10-14 | Linux Headlines

    Perl 6 is renamed, AWS goes metal with ARM, OnionShare just got a big upgrade, and Google has a new security dongle.

  • ArcoLinux 19.10.1 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at ArcoLinux 19.10.1. Enjoy!

Red Hat: Red Hat Summit 2019, CFO Fired, Fedora 32, Dependency Analytics and Awards

  • Top 10 highlights at Red Hat Summit 2019

    As we careen into Fall, we at Red Hat have had a few months to catch our breath after another fantastic Red Hat Summit. Which means… we're busy planning for next year's Red Hat Summit. As we get everything lined up for next year, let's take a look back at some of the highlights from our time in Boston. [...] Every year the Red Hat Innovation Awards recognize the technological achievements of Red Hat customers around the world who demonstrate creative thinking, determined problem-solving and transformative uses of Red Hat technology. The 2019 winners were: BP, Deutsche Bank, Emirates NBD, HCA Healthcare and Kohl's. In addition, HCA Healthcare was voted the 2019 Red Hat Innovator of the Year for its efforts to use data and technology to support modern healthcare. A cross-functional team of clinicians, data scientists and technology professionals at HCA Healthcare used Red Hat solutions to create a real-time predictive analytics product system to more accurately and rapidly detect sepsis, a potentially life-threatening condition.

  • Red Hat Sacks CFO Over Alleged Workplace Standards Violation

    Red Hat CFO has been shown the door in alleged workplace standards violation.

  • Red Hat Developers Eyeing CPU Thermal Management Improvements For Fedora 32

    Several Red Hat developers are looking at improving the CPU thermal management capabilities for Fedora Workstation 32 and in turn possibly helping Intel CPUs reach better performance. The change being sought for Fedora Workstation 32 would be shipping Intel's thermal daemon (thermald) by default with Fedora 32 and with that carrying various hardware specific configuration data for helping CPUs reach their optimal thermal/power limits. Intel's open-source thermal daemon can already be installed on most Linux distributions as a separate package but isn't normally shipped by default. With Fedora Workstation 32 it could be shipped by default for its goal of trying to keep CPUs operating in the correct temperature envelop and to reach maximum performance.

  • What’s new in Red Hat Dependency Analytics

    We are excited to announce a new release of Red Hat Dependency Analytics, a solution that enables developers to create better applications by evaluating and adding high-quality open source components, directly from their IDE. Red Hat Dependency Analytics helps your development team avoid security and licensing issues when building your applications. It plugs into the developer’s IDE, automatically analyzes your software composition, and provides recommendations to address security holes and licensing problems that your team may be missing. Without further ado, let’s jump into the new capabilities offered in this release. This release includes a new version of the IDE plugin and the server-side analysis service hosted by Red Hat.

  • Awards roll call: Red Hat awards, July 2019 - October 2019

    As we head into the new season, we?d like to spread the excitement by sharing some of our latest awards and industry recognition. Since our last roundup, Red Hat has been honored with accolades highlighting our unique culture, our creative and design work and our expansive product portfolio.

today's howtos