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Friday, 17 Aug 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Android Leftovers

Linux Scaling Benchmarks With The AMD Threadripper 2990WX In Various Workloads

While yesterday were the benchmarks showing how Linux games struggle to scale past a few CPU cores/threads, in this article is a look at the scaling performance of various applications/workloads under Linux up to 64 threads using the AMD Threadripper 2990WX. Here's a look at how the Linux performance changes in a variety of applications from one to sixty-four threads with this new HEDT processor. The benchmarks today are for mostly curiosity sake about Linux and the Threadripper 2990WX, particularly on the impact of 32 threads (cores) to 64 threads with SMT, etc. In the next few days is a much more interesting comparison and that is looking at the Windows Server 2019 vs. Linux performance on the Threadripper 2990WX at various SMT and CCX configurations. That should reveal a lot about Windows' scaling abilities given the immense interest this week in the Windows vs. Linux Threadripper performance. But for today are just these reference numbers. Read more

AryaLinux: A Distribution and a Platform

I’ll be honest, if you’re just a standard desktop user, AryaLinux is not for you. Although you can certainly get right to work on the desktop, if you need anything outside of the default applications, you might find it a bit too much trouble to bother with. If, on the other hand, you’re a developer, AryaLinux might be a great platform for you. Or, if you just want to see what it’s like to build a Linux distribution from scratch, AryaLinux is a pretty easy route. Even with its quirks, AryaLinux holds a lot of promise as both a Linux distribution and platform. If the developers can see to it to build a GUI front-end for the alps package manager, AryaLinux could make some serious noise. Read more

Lennart Jern: How Do You Fedora?

Lennart Jern is a Swedish-speaking Finn, who has been living in Umeå, Sweden, for about three years. He was born and raised in southern Finland where he obtained his master’s degree in applied mathematics. His time at university exposed Lennart’s true passion. “While at the university, I realized that computer science was really what I wanted to work with.” In order to follow his dream of working in computer science he moved to Sweden with his wife to pursue a master’s program in computer science. After a short while he had learned enough to land a job with a local startup. “I’m working with cloud/distributed systems, specifically with tools like kubernetes and OpenShift.” Lennart’s first contact with Linux was in 2006. Some of the computers in his high school were running OpenSuse. He installed Ubuntu’s Hardy Heron in 2008 and has been using Linux ever since. Read more

Devices/Embedded: Raspberry Pi, Librem and More

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • A Raspberry Pi-style computer you can build yourself: Blueberry Pi

    If buying a Raspberry Pi or one of the many other single-board computers available isn't a tough enough challenge, hacker Marcel Thürmer has sketched out enough details about his Blueberry Pi open-source hardware project to help the like-minded take things to the next level.

    As Thürmer wryly notes on the GitHub page where he's left the Blueberry Pi's schematics, this is just "another fruit single-board computer" based on the Allwinner V3s system on chip (SoC).

    However, while some single-board computer makers have open-sourced their hardware designs, unless you're building a large enough quantity, it's probably not worth the cost or effort.

  • Ethical aesthetics – Librem 5 design report #7

    You may have noticed that there is no obvious visual branding on the Librem laptops. While this was at first a technical limitation on the very first Librem model (back in 2015), the subtle and minimalistic branding that began on newer models in 2016 was a conscious design decision.

    Now, we’re hoping to refine the physical branding further.
    One reason for a minimalist design is aesthetic. Just like on a piece of hand-made jewelry, we wish the branding to be made in the form of an inconspicuous marking that doesn’t interfere with the natural beauty of the overall shape.

  • Intel launches seven NUCs with Coffee Lake and 10nm Canyon Lake CPUs

    Intel has launched five, barebones “Bean Canyon” NUC mini-PC kits equipped with 14nm, 8th Gen “Coffee Lake” CPUs starting at $299. It also unveiled two configured, Windows 10 equipped NUCs that tap its 10nm “Canyon Lake” chips.

  • Rugged, Linux-friendly embedded PC plugs you into the CANBus

    IEI announced an IP40-protected “DRPC-130-AL” DIN-rail computer with an Atom x5-E3930, CANBus, SATA, eMMC, 4x USB 3.0, dual HDMI and GbE, extended temperature support, and shock and vibration resistance.

    IEI’s fanless DRPC-130-AL may be the quintessential compact industrial embedded PC. Nothing much stands out except for the CANBus port, but IEI Technology has crammed a lot into a compact, 1.4 kg, 174 x 130 x 58.8mm chassis.

Games Leftovers

DXVK 0.70 is out with support for Direct3D 10 over Vulkan in Wine

Filed under
Gaming
  • DXVK 0.70 is out with support for Direct3D 10 over Vulkan in Wine

    DXVK [GitHub] continues the amazing progress towards helping Linux gamers play their favourite Windows-only games on Linux.

    Just released minutes ago, DXVK 0.70 adds in the previously announced Direct3D 10 support (more info here). In addition to this, it also adds in support for the D3D11.1 ClearView method and D3D11.1 extended double instructions.

  • DXVK 0.70 Released With Initial Direct3D 10 Over Vulkan Support

    Just in time for any weekend Linux gamers, a new release of DXVK is available that maps the Direct3D API to Vulkan for allowing faster Windows gaming performance under Wine.

    DXVK started out with a focus on supporting the Direct3D 11 API and it's been doing a wonderful job at supporting a massive collection of D3D11 Windows games running at great speeds under Wine+DXVK thanks to Vulkan. Recently it started adding Direct3D 10 support using a small wrapper. With today's DXVK 0.70, it's the initial release that includes this preliminary Direct3D 10 support.

Linux Scaling Benchmarks With The AMD Threadripper 2990WX In Various Workloads

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

While yesterday were the benchmarks showing how Linux games struggle to scale past a few CPU cores/threads, in this article is a look at the scaling performance of various applications/workloads under Linux up to 64 threads using the AMD Threadripper 2990WX. Here's a look at how the Linux performance changes in a variety of applications from one to sixty-four threads with this new HEDT processor.

The benchmarks today are for mostly curiosity sake about Linux and the Threadripper 2990WX, particularly on the impact of 32 threads (cores) to 64 threads with SMT, etc. In the next few days is a much more interesting comparison and that is looking at the Windows Server 2019 vs. Linux performance on the Threadripper 2990WX at various SMT and CCX configurations. That should reveal a lot about Windows' scaling abilities given the immense interest this week in the Windows vs. Linux Threadripper performance. But for today are just these reference numbers.

Read more

AryaLinux: A Distribution and a Platform

Filed under
Linux

I’ll be honest, if you’re just a standard desktop user, AryaLinux is not for you. Although you can certainly get right to work on the desktop, if you need anything outside of the default applications, you might find it a bit too much trouble to bother with. If, on the other hand, you’re a developer, AryaLinux might be a great platform for you. Or, if you just want to see what it’s like to build a Linux distribution from scratch, AryaLinux is a pretty easy route.

Even with its quirks, AryaLinux holds a lot of promise as both a Linux distribution and platform. If the developers can see to it to build a GUI front-end for the alps package manager, AryaLinux could make some serious noise.

Read more

Lennart Jern: How Do You Fedora?

Filed under
Red Hat
Interviews

Lennart Jern is a Swedish-speaking Finn, who has been living in Umeå, Sweden, for about three years. He was born and raised in southern Finland where he obtained his master’s degree in applied mathematics. His time at university exposed Lennart’s true passion. “While at the university, I realized that computer science was really what I wanted to work with.” In order to follow his dream of working in computer science he moved to Sweden with his wife to pursue a master’s program in computer science. After a short while he had learned enough to land a job with a local startup. “I’m working with cloud/distributed systems, specifically with tools like kubernetes and OpenShift.”

Lennart’s first contact with Linux was in 2006. Some of the computers in his high school were running OpenSuse. He installed Ubuntu’s Hardy Heron in 2008 and has been using Linux ever since.

Read more

Security: WebAssembly, HTTP Tokens and More

Filed under
Security
  • The Problems and Promise of WebAssembly

    WebAssembly is a format that allows code written in assembly-like instructions to be run from JavaScript. It has recently been implemented in all four major browsers. We reviewed each browser’s WebAssembly implementation and found three vulnerabilities. This blog post gives an overview of the features and attack surface of WebAssembly, as well as the vulnerabilities we found.

    [...]

    Overall, the majority of the bugs we found in WebAssembly were related to the parsing of WebAssembly binaries, and this has been mirrored in vulnerabilities reported by other parties. Also, compared to other recent browser features, surprisingly few vulnerabilities have been reported in it. This is likely due to the simplicity of the current design, especially with regards to memory management.

    There are two emerging features of WebAssembly that are likely to have a security impact. One is threading. Currently, WebAssembly only supports concurrency via JavaScript workers, but this is likely to change. Since JavaScript is designed assuming that this is the only concurrency model, WebAssembly threading has the potential to require a lot of code to be thread safe that did not previously need to be, and this could lead to security problems.

    WebAssembly GC is another potential feature of WebAssembly that could lead to security problems. Currently, some uses of WebAssembly have performance problems due to the lack of higher-level memory management in WebAssembly. For example, it is difficult to implement a performant Java Virtual Machine in WebAssembly. If WebAssembly GC is implemented, it will increase the number of applications that WebAssembly can be used for, but it will also make it more likely that vulnerabilities related to memory management will occur in both WebAssembly engines and applications written in WebAssembly.

  • Detecting Bomb And Guns Using Normal WiFi: Researchers Find A New Way

    The test was able to give out accurate results on 15 different objects ranging in there different categories — Metal, liquid, and non-dangerous items.

    While it’s not clear whether the government will adopt and use the newly developed tracking method in public places, this certainly looks like the best way to stop guns and bombs get into school premises.

  • What OpenShift Online customers should know about L1TF OpenShift SRE Security

    On Aug. 14, 2018, information was released about another set of “speculative execution” issues with Intel microprocessor hardware known as “L1 Terminal Fault”. As with earlier issues like Spectre and Meltdown, this information was coordinated with the release of updated software solutions to help mitigate the issue.

    At the time the embargo was lifted, the OpenShift SRE team worked to begin remediation (detailed below) on all OpenShift Online clusters. All Pro clusters finished remediation shortly before 18h00 EDT August 14, 2018. All Starter clusters were patched as of 23h30 EDT August 14, 2018.

  • L1TF (AKA Foreshadow) Explained in 3 Minutes from Red Hat
  • Google bod wants cookies to crumble and be remade into something more secure

    A key member of the Google Chrome security team has proposed the death of cookies to be replaced with secure HTTP tokens.

    This week Mike West posted his "not-fully-baked" idea on GitHub and asked for comments. "This isn't a proposal that's well thought out, and stamped solidly with the Google Seal of Approval," he warns. "It's a collection of interesting ideas for discussion, nothing more, nothing less."

    So far, people are largely receptive to the idea while pointing to the complexities that exist in trying to replace something that has become an everyday part of online interaction.

  • Mozilla Recommend a Privacy Extension That Is Tracking Your Web History

    Web Security, a Firefox extension with over 200,000 current users, tracks every website users visit and stores that information on a German web server.

    The extension was recommended by Mozilla in a blog post last week about add-ons that improve users’ privacy. Mozilla has since edited the post, removing Web Security.

Programming: Perl, Python, CRAN

Filed under
Development
  • Garbage collection in Perl 6

    In the first article in this series on migrating Perl 5 code to Perl 6, we looked into some of the issues you might encounter when porting your code. In this second article, we’ll get into how garbage collection differs in Perl 6.

    There is no timely destruction of objects in Perl 6. This revelation usually comes as quite a shock to people used to the semantics of object destruction in Perl 5. But worry not, there are other ways in Perl 6 to get the same behavior, albeit requiring a little more thought by the developer. Let’s first examine a little background on the situation in Perl 5.

  • An introduction to the Django Python web app framework

    In the first three articles of this four-part series comparing different Python web frameworks, we covered the Pyramid, Flask, and Tornado web frameworks. We've built the same app three times and have finally made our way to Django. Django is, by and large, the major web framework for Python developers these days and it's not too hard to see why. It excels in hiding a lot of the configuration logic and letting you focus on being able to build big, quickly.

    That said, when it comes to small projects, like our To-Do List app, Django can be a bit like bringing a firehose to a water gun fight. Let's see how it all comes together.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: RcppArmadillo 0.9.100.5.0

    A new RcppArmadillo release 0.9.100.5.0, based on the new Armadillo release 9.100.5 from earlier today, is now on CRAN and in Debian.

    It once again follows our (and Conrad's) bi-monthly release schedule. Conrad started with a new 9.100.* series a few days ago. I ran reverse-depends checks and found an issue which he promptly addressed; CRAN found another which he also very promptly addressed. It remains a true pleasure to work with such experienced professionals as Conrad (with whom I finally had a beer around the recent useR! in his home town) and of course the CRAN team whose superb package repository truly is the bedrock of the R community.

Red Hat News/Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat

Cloudgizer: An introduction to a new open source web development tool

Filed under
OSS
HowTos

Cloudgizer is a free open source tool for building web applications. It combines the ease of scripting languages with the performance of C, helping manage the development effort and run-time resources for cloud applications.

Cloudgizer works on Red Hat/CentOS Linux with the Apache web server and MariaDB database. It is licensed under Apache License version 2.

Read more

James Bottomley on Linux, Containers, and the Leading Edge

Filed under
Linux

It’s no secret that Linux is basically the operating system of containers, and containers are the future of the cloud, says James Bottomley, Distinguished Engineer at IBM Research and Linux kernel developer. Bottomley, who can often be seen at open source events in his signature bow tie, is focused these days on security systems like the Trusted Platform Module and the fundamentals of container technology.

Read more

TransmogrifAI From Salesforce

Filed under
OSS
  • Salesforce plans to open-source the technology behind its Einstein machine-learning services

    Salesforce is open-sourcing the method it has developed for using machine-learning techniques at scale — without mixing valuable customer data — in hopes other companies struggling with data science problems can benefit from its work.

    The company plans to announce Thursday that TransmogrifAI, which is a key part of the Einstein machine-learning services that it believes are the future of its flagship Sales Cloud and related services, will be available for anyone to use in their software-as-a-service applications. Consisting of less than 10 lines of code written on top of the widely used Apache Spark open-source project, it is the result of years of work on training machine-learning models to predict customer behavior without dumping all of that data into a common training ground, said Shubha Nabar, senior director of data science for Salesforce Einstein.

  • Salesforce open-sources TransmogrifAI, the machine learning library that powers Einstein

    Machine learning models — artificial intelligence (AI) that identifies relationships among hundreds, thousands, or even millions of data points — are rarely easy to architect. Data scientists spend weeks and months not only preprocessing the data on which the models are to be trained, but extracting useful features (i.e., the data types) from that data, narrowing down algorithms, and ultimately building (or attempting to build) a system that performs well not just within the confines of a lab, but in the real world.

Windows Games On Linux and Linux Gaming Performance

Filed under
GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Windows Games On Linux? Valve May Be Working On New “Steam Play” Tool

    Even though there are quite a few Linux-based distro options for gamers, hardcore gamers often go back to Windows to play the games they love. SteamOS from Valve, the most popular gaming Linux distro, seems to be making headlines from time-to-time, but things have been quiet for some time.

  • A Look At Linux Gaming Performance Scaling On The Threadripper 2950X

    On Monday when the launch embargo expired on the Threadripper 2950X and Threadripper 2990WX I hadn't run any gaming benchmarks since, well, most games even on Windows can't scale out to 32 threads let alone 64 threads... Especially on Linux. It's far more practical getting these Threadripper 2 processors if you want to compile with 32 or 64 make jobs -- among many other common multi-threaded Linux workloads -- versus using this $899 or $1799 processor for a Linux gaming system. But if you are curious how Linux games scale with the Threadripper 2950X, here are some benchmark results when testing both AMD Radeon and NVIDIA GeForce graphics.

Kernel: Linux 4.19 and Security Aspects

Filed under
Linux
  • Some Of The Smaller Features Hitting The Linux 4.19 Kernel This Week

    Here is a look at some of the smaller features landing in the Linux 4.19 kernel this week in a variety of different subsystems.

  • Linux Kernel Diverts Question To Distros: Trust CPU Hardware Random Number Generators?

    In a controversial move, the Linux kernel will be pushing the question off to distribution vendors on whether to put trust in CPU hardware random number generators.

    Google's Ted Ts'o sent out the random subsystem updates this week for the Linux 4.19 kernel merge window. In addition to the recent change of better protecting entropy sent in from user-space, the decision on whether to trust the CPU hardware random number generators like Intel's RdRand will now be left up to the Linux distribution vendors or end-users having the final say in overriding that decision.

  • L1TF / Foreshadow Mitigations Land In Linux 4.18 / 4.17 / 4.14 / 4.9 / 4.4 Kernel Update

    Linux stable maintainer Greg Kroah-Hartman has released new updates across the Linux 4.18, 4.17, 4.14, 4.9, and 4.4 kernel channels to address the recently exposed L1 Terminal Fault "L1TF" / Foreshadow Meltdown-like CPU vulnerability affecting Intel processors.

    Linux 4.4.148, 4.9.120, 4.14.63, 4.17.15, and 4.18.1 are all out this morning with their principal changes in these patch releases being the inclusion of L1TF/Foreshadow mitigation. As covered already, the default behavior is to carry out conditional L1D flushes on VMENTER, but there are kernel knobs available for always forcing L1 cache flushes on VMENTER and the full protection of disabling SMP/HT support.

  • Linux 4.19 Goes Ahead And Makes Lazy TLB Mode Lazier For Small Performance Benefit

    Last month I wrote about lazy TLB mode improvements on the way to the mainline kernel and this week the changes were indeed merged for the in-development Linux 4.19 kernel.

ASUS Begins Offering Linux-Based Endless OS On Select Laptops

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

It has been a while since ASUS last offered any Linux options for laptops, but they appear to have a new effort underway with Endless OS.

For those that remember Eee PC from a decade ago, ASUS used to offer some Linux laptops/netbook options that back was using Xandros Linux during the netbook fad...

Read more

Games: Fell Seal: Arbiter's Mark, Orwell, Megaquarium, Moonlighter

Filed under
Gaming

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • libinput's "new" trackpoint acceleration method

    This is mostly a request for testing, because I've received zero feedback on the patches that I merged a month ago and libinput 1.12 is due to be out. No comments so far on the RC1 and RC2 either, so... well, maybe this gets a bit broader attention so we can address some things before the release. One can hope.

    [...]

    Because basically every trackpoint has different random data ranges not linked to anything easily measurable, libinput's device quirks now support a magic multiplier to scale the trackpoint range into something resembling a sane range. This is basically what we did before with the systemd POINTINGSTICK_CONST_ACCEL property except that we're handling this in libinput now (which is where acceleration is handled, so it kinda makes sense to move it here). There is no good conversion from the previous trackpoint range property to the new multiplier because the range didn't really have any relation to the physical input users expected.

  • 15 Tips On How to Use ‘Curl’ Command in Linux
  • Disassembling JITed code in GDB
  • PSA: Workaround for a working MTP

    KDE Connect is awesome, we all know that. But sometimes you still want (or need) to acces the files on your Android phone via a good old USB cable. And to do so, you need a working implementation of the MTP protocol.

    Many people on bugzilla complain that the MTP support in Plasma is just broken. And indeed the MTP implementation we have has always been ignoring a fundamental limitation of MTP: the protocol doesn’t allow parallel operations, unlike the old Android USB mass storage did. In practice, if more than one process spawns an mtp ioslave, everything breaks.

  • Museum Day, or, the Benefit of Skiving Off

    Tomorrow, there’s the fund raiser training session. Given that we’ve been raising funds for Krita since time immemorial (our first fund raiser was for two Wacom tablets and art pens so we could implement support for them, the second to let Lukas Tvrdy work on Krita for a couple of months and after that, we’ve had the kickstarters), that might seem superfluous. But I’m still hoping to learn lots. After all, it’s not like we’re exactly awash in money.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android
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Android Leftovers

Linux Scaling Benchmarks With The AMD Threadripper 2990WX In Various Workloads

While yesterday were the benchmarks showing how Linux games struggle to scale past a few CPU cores/threads, in this article is a look at the scaling performance of various applications/workloads under Linux up to 64 threads using the AMD Threadripper 2990WX. Here's a look at how the Linux performance changes in a variety of applications from one to sixty-four threads with this new HEDT processor. The benchmarks today are for mostly curiosity sake about Linux and the Threadripper 2990WX, particularly on the impact of 32 threads (cores) to 64 threads with SMT, etc. In the next few days is a much more interesting comparison and that is looking at the Windows Server 2019 vs. Linux performance on the Threadripper 2990WX at various SMT and CCX configurations. That should reveal a lot about Windows' scaling abilities given the immense interest this week in the Windows vs. Linux Threadripper performance. But for today are just these reference numbers. Read more

AryaLinux: A Distribution and a Platform

I’ll be honest, if you’re just a standard desktop user, AryaLinux is not for you. Although you can certainly get right to work on the desktop, if you need anything outside of the default applications, you might find it a bit too much trouble to bother with. If, on the other hand, you’re a developer, AryaLinux might be a great platform for you. Or, if you just want to see what it’s like to build a Linux distribution from scratch, AryaLinux is a pretty easy route. Even with its quirks, AryaLinux holds a lot of promise as both a Linux distribution and platform. If the developers can see to it to build a GUI front-end for the alps package manager, AryaLinux could make some serious noise. Read more

Lennart Jern: How Do You Fedora?

Lennart Jern is a Swedish-speaking Finn, who has been living in Umeå, Sweden, for about three years. He was born and raised in southern Finland where he obtained his master’s degree in applied mathematics. His time at university exposed Lennart’s true passion. “While at the university, I realized that computer science was really what I wanted to work with.” In order to follow his dream of working in computer science he moved to Sweden with his wife to pursue a master’s program in computer science. After a short while he had learned enough to land a job with a local startup. “I’m working with cloud/distributed systems, specifically with tools like kubernetes and OpenShift.” Lennart’s first contact with Linux was in 2006. Some of the computers in his high school were running OpenSuse. He installed Ubuntu’s Hardy Heron in 2008 and has been using Linux ever since. Read more