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Wednesday, 25 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ubuntu Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2018 - 9:48pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2018 - 9:47pm
Story Red Hat: Storage, Liferay and More Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2018 - 9:40pm
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2018 - 9:35pm
Story Programming: Node.js, Python, OpenCL, GitLab, GCC Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2018 - 9:34pm
Story Should we open source election software? Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2018 - 9:32pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 25/04/2018 - 6:25pm
Story What Do High School Students Know or Understand about Open Source Software? Rianne Schestowitz 25/04/2018 - 6:11pm
Story Open-spec SBC is a clone of a clone of a clone of a Raspberry Pi 3 Rianne Schestowitz 25/04/2018 - 6:08pm
Story Post/Node #111111 Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2018 - 6:05pm

Ubuntu Leftovers

Filed under
Ubuntu

Red Hat: Storage, Liferay and More

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat Gets Serious About Selling Open Source Storage

    If there is one consistent complaint about open source software over the past three decades that it has been on the rise, it is that it is too difficult to integrate various components to solve a particular problem because the software is not really enterprise grade stuff. Well, that is two complaints, and really, there are three because even if you can get the stuff integrated and running well, that doesn’t mean you can keep it in that state as you patch and update it. So now we are up to three complaints.

  • Red Hat Announces GA Of Storage One

    Today Red Hat Inc. announced the general availability of Red Hat Storage One. Storage One is Red Hat’s approach to web-scale enterprise storage with the best of both worlds: a hardware-optimized turnkey solution with the flexibility and scale of software-defined storage. Storage One is built on the rest of Red Hat’s storage portfolio.

    The huge increases in data volumes make options like software-defined storage (SDS) seem more and more attractive. However, adopting SDS can be complicated involving new skill sets and configurations to systems. Red Hat’s new Storage One is a plug-and-play SDS solution that the company states can meet the varying demands of modern workloads. Red Hat worked closely with its server hardware partners (Supermicro Computer being the first) to deliver a tightly packaged workload-optimized storage solution. The company goes on to state that Red Hat Storage One is not just SDS in name but offers an open, flexible, and modular solution that can easily be extended to meet the evolving needs of the modern enterprise.

  • Firelay partners with Red Hat to deliver Liferay DXP on OpenShift

    Firelay, a Liferay Certified Hosting Partner, has begun a collaboration with Red Hat, the world’s leading provider of open source solutions, in order to deliver the Liferay Digital Experience Platform (DXP) on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform. The availability for Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform allows Firelay to support the full life cycle of Liferay DXP-projects that are based on container technology, both those using the cloud- as well as on-premises installations.

  • Our Book Has Been Released! Introducing Istio Service Mesh for Microservices
  • Now available: The ultimate DevOps hiring guide

    Hiring the right people and building a successful team is no easy task. There are many facets to consider when talking to candidates, from cultural fit and team dynamics to skills, knowledge, and problem-solving ability. The ultimate DevOps hiring guide will touch on all those areas and more. More importantly, the freely downloadable PDF will help you navigate the unique dynamics that encompass the DevOps movement.

  • Red Hat Summit 2018: Trends in cloud-native development
  • Buy or Sell? What Analysts Recommends: Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), Hertz Global Holdings, Inc. (HTZ)
  • Brokerages Set Red Hat Software (RHT) PT at $154.94
  • Why is Red Hat (RHT) Up 4.9% Since Last Earnings Report?
  • Flatpak's XDG-Desktop-Portal Adds Initial Support For Snaps

    Released yesterday was version 0.11 of the XDG Desktop Portal and with this release comes initial support for Snap packages.

    The XDG-Desktop-Portal package is the portal front-end service originally designed for Flatpak (originally XDG-Apps) and provide a number of the portals for sandboxed applications to access system information and services.

  • Fedora 27 Coloured Bash prompt

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • TIBCO Messaging now supports Apache Kafka

    Apache Kafka is a distributed open source publish-subscribe messaging system designed to replace traditional message brokers – as such, it can be classed as a stream-processing software platform. The project aims to provide a unified, high-throughput, low-latency platform for handling real-time data feeds. It is written in the Scala and Java programming languages.

  • Robo-Taxi Startup Voyage to Make its Autonomous Safety Systems Open Source

    Silicon Valley startup Voyage, which recently launched a pilot autonomous ride-hailing service in two retirement communities in California and Florida, is taken a proactive, safety first approach. Starting today, the company announced today it is opening its safety requirements, test scenarios, metrics, tools, and source code that it has developed for its own autonomous taxis.

  • Former Nimble CEO Becomes New Leader Of Open-Source Container Vendor Sysdig
  • Propy Announces An Open Source Developer Program and gets listed on Bittrex

    On April 17, 2018, global real estate store with a decentralized title registry Propy announced their open source Developer Program. The news were followed by an announcement from Bittrex, the most popular U.S.-based blockchain trading platform, on listing the PRO token. Propy users need tokens to execute the purchase process for real estate, located in California, as of today.

    The idea behind Propy: it allows anyone to buy or sell real estate, anywhere, online. Propy provides an efficient crypto and fiat payment and an immutable record on the blockchain, ensuring that title deeds and property rights will be there forever.

Programming: Node.js, Python, OpenCL, GitLab, GCC

Filed under
Development
  • Node.js announces the first release in its latest 10.x release line

    Node.js has announced 10.0.0, the first release in its 10.x line. Starting in October 2018, the Node.js 10.x releases will be the new release line with Long Term Support. Releases in the Long Term Support line focus on stability, extended support, and providing a reliable platform for applications of any scale.

  • Enhance your Python with an interactive shell

    The Python programming language has become one of the most popular languages used in IT. One reason for this success is it can be used to solve a variety of problems. From web development to data science, machine learning to task automation, the Python ecosystem is rich in popular frameworks and libraries. This article presents some useful Python shells available in the Fedora packages collection to make development easier.

  • Best Free Python Web Frameworks – Rapid Development

    Python is an increasingly popular programming language. It ranks very highly on sites listing the popularity of programming languages, such as the TIOBE Index, IEEE Spectrum ranking, and the PYPL PopularitY of Programming Language.

    The prominence of Python is, in part, due to its flexibility, with the language frequently used by web and desktop developers, system administrators, data scientists, and machine learning engineers. It’s easy to learn and powerful to develop any kind of system with the language. Python’s large user base offers a virtuous circle. There’s more support available from the open source community for budding programmers seeking assistance.

  • Intel OpenCL NEO Compute Stack Moves To "Production" Quality OpenCL 2.1

    This year Intel open-sourced their "NEO" OpenCL compute stack included a new compute runtime, a new LLVM/Clang-based compiler, makes use of the Intel Graphics Memory Management Library (GMMLIB), etc. While we don't hear too much from the NEO effort on an ongoing basis, their OpenCL 2.1 support for recent hardware generations is now to production quality.

    From early March was my last reporting and testing on the Intel OpenCL NEO effort in Trying Out The New Intel Open-Source OpenCL NEO Compute Driver.

  • GitLab 10.7 Released with Open Source Web IDE and Extended SAST Support
  • GCC 8.1 RC1 Released, The Big Compiler Update Could Officially Debut Next Week

    This morning I wrote about GCC 8 being branched and development on the master branch now being open for GCC 9.0. The GCC 8.1 release candidate has now been issued with the official release perhaps coming next week.

    Jakub Jelinek of Red Hat announced on the mailing list that they reached zero P1 regressions (the most critical) and less than 100 P2/P3 regressions, so the GCC 8 code was branched. As part of this status report he mentioned that if no show-stopper bugs appear, the developers would like to officially release GCC 8.1.0 by the end of next week or soon thereafter. But if any important fixes come about, a second release candidate may be warranted.

  • GCC 8 Has Been Branched, GCC 9.0 Development On Main

    The GNU Compiler Collection 8 stable release (GCC 8.1) is almost ready to make its debut.

    As of this morning, the GCC 8 code has been branched from master. The branched GCC 8 code is now marked as a pre-release.

Should we open source election software?

Filed under
OSS

Late last year, R. James Woolsey and Brian Fox wrote an op-ed piece about the security benefits of open sourcing election software. Woolsey is a former director of the Central Intelligence Agency. Fox is the creator of several open source components, including the GNU Bash shell, and a board member of the National Association of Voting Officials.

Woolsey and Fox assert as a main piece of their argument that open source software exposes the code to the larger developer community, allowing many eyes to comb through that code for security vulnerabilities, transparency that makes it more secure than software developed by commercial organizations.

If the open source model for voting systems gains traction, as the editorial advocates, effective management of open source security will become extremely important. At the 2017 DEF CON 25 convention it took only a few hours for white hat hackers to break into five different voting machines, one via a vulnerability in an open-source component.

The reality is that all software, whether developed in a transparent manner or otherwise, contains defects. Regardless of available resources and expertise, uncovering a defect can be challenging.

Read more

What Do High School Students Know or Understand about Open Source Software?

Filed under
OSS

Only 20 years after the label "Open Source" was coined, the entire tech ecosystem has embraced its values of sharing, collaboration and freedom. Although Open Source Software is pervasive to our everyday life, does everyone and especially the younger generation realize how to leverage it?

Last summer, over the course of 3 weeks, High School students with no prior experience in Computer Science (CS) joined Holberton School’s first Immersion Coding Camp to learn how to code and build their own website.

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Open-spec SBC is a clone of a clone of a clone of a Raspberry Pi 3

Filed under
Linux

FriendlyElec has launched a $35m open-spec “NanoPi K1 Plus” SBC with a quad -A53 Allwinner H5, 2GB DDR3, WiFi, GbE, a 40-pin expansion header, and Ubuntu Core and Armbian images.

A year ago when FriendElec launched its $40 (now $45) NanoPi K2 SBC, we called it an Odroid-C2 clone with wireless, as well as a near clone of the Raspberry Pi 3. The new NanoPi K1 Plus is a slightly reduced, but more media-rich, version that switches from the Amlogic S905, which is also found on the Odroid-C2, to an Allwinner H5, which is used by several other NanoPi boards. Both SoCs give you 4x Cortex-A53 cores and a Mali-450 GPU, but the H5 tops out at 1.4GHz instead of 1.5GHz.

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Post/Node #111111

Filed under
Misc

This is the 111111th node. It's a special number and a milestone for us. Will we have reached the 222222nd by 2030? Time will tell. Maybe Drupal won't even be around by then.

Ubuntu: Didier Roche's Interviews Series and Resurgence of Ubuntu Touch

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Welcome To The (Ubuntu) Bionic Age: Behind communitheme: interviewing Aaron

    I’m Aaron Papin and I’m from Trinidad and Tobago. I work at an IT consultancy that specializes in open-source solutions for SMBs. I’m a technician, but I also work in designing and deploying websites and even on ads from time to time. It’s pretty freeform and fun.

    I knew of Linux for years, but I only dove in after a hard drive failure a couple years ago. Because why not at that point? It didn’t take me long to start using it mostly full time (games). Even though I’ve worked on my own themes in the past, I’m still pretty new to the Linux community. Hobby-wise, I really like TV, cooking, video games and keeping fit when I’m not on an “extended break”.

  • Purism and UBports officially collaborate to offer Ubuntu Touch on Librem 5

    Purism and UBports are partnering to offer Ubuntu Touch as a supported operating system on Purism’s Librem 5 smartphone.

    Being able to work with Purism and focus on the Librem 5 hardware platform ensures that the Ubuntu Touch mobile operating system developed by UBports will be well supported, tightly integrated, and that future compatibility will remain. When the Librem 5 is delivered to pre-order customers, it will become one of just a few smartphones that support the free and open source operating system.

  • Open Source Smartphone Librem 5 Will Officially Support Ubuntu Touch

    When Canonical decided to halt the development of Ubuntu Touch mobile operating system, it came as a surprise to many. However, due to the lack of interest of smartphone manufacturers and community, this tough decision was taken. Later, UBPorts decided to take up the Ubuntu Touch development work.

  • Purism Partners with UBports to Offer Ubuntu Touch on the Librem 5, Red Hat Storage One Launches and More

    Purism has partnered with UBports to offer Ubuntu Touch on its Librem 5 smartphone. By default, the smartphone runs Purism's PureOS, which supports GNOME and KDE Plasma mobile interfaces. UBports is ensuring Ubuntu Touch will run on the phones as well, so the Librem 5 can "now offer users three fully free and open mobile operating system options".

BSD: DragonFlyBSD's Latest and NetBSD 8.0 Release Candidate 1

Filed under
BSD

Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming

What's New in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Bionic Beaver

Filed under
Ubuntu

Have a look at the new features coming to Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.
Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Google looks set to offer Linux on Chromebooks in the next few months

    If that wasn't enough, a new commit in the parent Chromium OS offers "new device policy to allow Linux VMs on Chrome OS." Which about seals it.

    Read the accompanying Gerrit documentation and you get further confirmation: "At this time, in order for Linux VMs to run, the Finch experiment also needs to be enabled. After this feature is fully launched, the Finch control logic will be removed."

  • xorg-server 1.19.99.905

    More bugfixes, and streams support for Xwayland. This will almost certainly be the last RC.

  • X.Org Server 1.20 RC5 Released, Adds EGLStreams To Let NVIDIA Work With XWayland

    Adam Jackson of Red Hat today announced the X.Org Server 1.20 Release Candidate 5, which he believes will be the last test release before going gold. Most excitingly about this new release candidate is the merged support for allowing the NVIDIA proprietary driver to work with XWayland.

  • Darktable Receives Support for Fujifilm X-H1 and Sony Alpha A7 Mark III Cameras

    darktable, the open-source and cross-platform RAW image editor supporting GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows operating systems, has been updated today to version 2.4.3.

    darktable 2.4.3 is a maintenance update that brings support for new digital cameras, including the recently released Fujifilm X-H1 and Sony Alpha A7 Mark III (includes noise profiles and white balance presets), as well as the Kodak EOS DCS 3, Olympus PEN E-PL9, Panasonic Lumix DC-GX9, and Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX1R II cameras.

    The update also brings noise profiles for the Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark III and Nikon D7500 digital cameras, and a bunch of new features like support for ratings and tags in the watermark module, a script to help users convert .dtyle files to the .xmp format, and support for building and installing noise tools.

  •  

  • Compact action-RPG 'The Swords of Ditto' is out with day-1 Linux support

    The Swords of Ditto is the new compact action-RPG from developer onebitbeyond and publisher Devolver Digital and it just released, although it has a big flaw right now on Linux. Sadly, Devolver Digital didn't respond to our review request. Thankfully, the Linux heroes over at GOG sent over a copy for me.

  • Q4OS Centaurus 3.2 - new testing release

    A new updated image of the Q4OS Centaurus testing live media has been just released, its core is based on the latest Debian Buster testing and Trinity Desktop 14.0.5 testing versions.

  • Ubuntu Touch lives on in Purism's Librem 5 smartphone

    Not quite five years ago, Canonical tried to challenge Apple iOS and Google Android with Ubuntu Touch, an alternative smartphone Linux. Users, phone carriers, and the open-source community failed to support it, so Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth closed the door on Ubuntu Touch development. But, in open source, programs don't die until its last developer gives up on it. Purism and UBports have partnered to offer Ubuntu Touch on Purism's Librem 5 smartphone.

  • Saying Something in April 2018

    Being able to bang on (that is to say, percussively test) Bionic Beaver has been a blast. I haven't done ISO testing this round. Instead, I've been using my Xubuntu desktop daily watching things break and have been watching apport file bugs. Doing so makes me realize that, frankly, I am not normal in terms of installed packages or workflow. I have quite a bit of LaTeX installed due to church work. I have many ham radio-related things installed. Audio production and video production packages are installed too. Yes, sometimes I break down and even use LibreOffice. I don't have the whole package archive installed but I have a visible chunk of it in place as I use many things in many ways.

  • “Unpatchable” Nintendo Switch Bug Lets Hackers Fullfill Their Wild Dreams
  • Spectral Monitoring for Drone Defense Applications

    The USRP Embedded Series platform uses the OpenEmbedded framework to create custom Linux distributions tailored to application specific needs. The default operating system is pre-installed with the UHD software API and a variety of third party development tools such as GNU Radio. Support for the RFNoC FPGA development framework enables deterministic computations for real-time and wideband signal processing.

  • How To Make Your Phone Look Like Android P
  • Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup time: April 27th starting at 12:00 p.m. EDT/16:00 UTC
  • PyRoMine uses NSA exploits to mine Monero and disable security features [Ed: NSA back doors in Microsoft Windows is a gift that keeps giving... to crackers]

    In an age where cryptomining software is beating out ransomware as the go-to for most hackers, a Python-based Monero miner is using stolen NSA exploits to gain an edge.

    In 2016 the Shadow Brokers leaked several hacking tools and zero-day exploits including ETERNALBLUE and ETERNALROMANCE  that targeted versions of Windows XP/Vista/8.1/7/10 and Windows Server 2003/2008/2012/2016 and took advantage of CVE-2017-0144 and CVE-2017-0145.

    Fortinet researchers spotted a malware dubbed “PyRoMine” which uses the ETERNALROMANCE exploit to spread to vulnerable Windows machines, according to an April 24 blog post. The malware isn't the first to mine cryptocurrency that uses previously leaked NSA exploits the malware is still a threat as it leaves machines vulnerable to future attacks because it starts RDP services and disables security services.

OSS Conferences and Funding

Filed under
OSS

Mozilla: Rust, Security, Things Gateway, Firefox and More

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Rust pattern: Precise closure capture clauses

    This is the second in a series of posts about Rust compiler errors. Each one will talk about a particular error that I got recently and try to explain (a) why I am getting it and (Cool how I fixed it. The purpose of this series of posts is partly to explain Rust, but partly just to gain data for myself. I may also write posts about errors I’m not getting – basically places where I anticipated an error, and used a pattern to avoid it. I hope that after writing enough of these posts, I or others will be able to synthesize some of these facts to make intermediate Rust material, or perhaps to improve the language itself.

  • This Week in Rust
  • Mozilla publishes recommendations on government vulnerability disclosure in Europe

    As we’ve argued on many occasions, effective government vulnerability disclosure (GVD) review processes can greatly enhance cybersecurity for governments, citizens, and companies, and help mitigate risk in an ever-broadening cyber threat landscape. In Europe, the EU is currently discussing a new legislative proposal to enhance cybersecurity across the bloc, the so-called ‘EU Cybersecurity Act’. In that context, we’ve just published our policy recommendations for lawmakers, in which we call on the EU to seize the opportunity to set a global policy norm for government vulnerability disclosure.

  • Testing Strategies for React and Redux
  • K Lars Lohn: Things Gateway - a Virtual Weather Station
  • Firefox DevEdition 60 Beta 14 Testday Results

    As you may already know, last Friday – April 20th – we held a new Testday event, for Firefox DevEdition 60 Beta 14.

    Thank you all for helping us make Mozilla a better place: gaby2300, micde, Jarrod Michell, Thomas Brooks.

  • Supporting Same-Site Cookies in Firefox 60

    Firefox 60 will introduce support for the same-site cookie attribute, which allows developers to gain more control over cookies. Since browsers will include cookies with every request to a website, most sites rely on this mechanism to determine whether users are logged in.

    Attackers can abuse the fact that cookies are automatically sent with every request to force a user to perform unwanted actions on the site where they are currently logged in. Such attacks, known as cross-site request forgeries (CSRF), allow attackers who control third-party code to perform fraudulent actions on the user’s behalf. Unfortunately current web architecture does not allow web applications to reliably distinguish between actions initiated by the user and those that are initiated by any of the third-party gadgets or scripts that they rely on.

  • Enterprise Policy Support in Firefox

    Last year, Mozilla ran a survey to find out top enterprise requirements for Firefox. Policy management (especially Windows Group Policy) was at the top of that list.

    For the past few months we’ve been working to build that support into Firefox in the form of a policy engine. The policy engine adds desktop configuration and customization features for enterprise users to Firefox. It works with any tool that wants to set policies including Windows Group Policy.

  • any.js

    Thanks to Ms2ger web-platform-tests is now even more awesome (not in the American sense). To avoid writing HTML boilerplate, web-platform-tests supports .window.js, .worker.js, and .any.js resources, for writing JavaScript that needs to run in a window, dedicated worker, or both at once. I very much recommend using these resource formats as they ease writing and reviewing tests and ensure APIs get tested across globals.

  • Alex Gibson: My fifth year working at Mozilla

    Today marks my fifth year working for Mozilla! This past year has been both fun and frantic, and overall was a really good year for both Mozilla and Firefox. Here’s a run down a few of the things I got to work on.

Fedora Workstation 28 Coming Soon

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Warming up for Fedora Workstation 28

    Been some time now since my last update on what is happening in Fedora Workstation and with current plans to release Fedora Workstation 28 in early May I thought this could be a good time to write something. As usual this is just a small subset of what the team has been doing and I always end up feeling a bit bad for not talking about the avalanche of general fixes and improvements the team adds to each release.

  • Fedora Workstation 28 Is Shaping Up To Be Another Terrific Update

    Fedora Workstation 28 is shaping up to be another compelling update for those that are fans of this bleeding-edge Red Hat sponsored Linux distribution. I've been running Fedora Workstation 28 snapshots on a few laptops and test machines here and am quite happy with how it's shaped up as another Fedora release that delivers not only the latest features, but doing so in a seemingly sane and stable manner: I haven't encountered any problems unlike some of the past notorious Fedora releases from years ago. Overall, I am quite excited for next month's Fedora 28 release and will be upgrading my main production system to it.

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