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Sunday, 24 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

  • 14/08/2017 - 5:04pm
    2daygeek
  • 11/07/2017 - 9:36am
    itsfoss
  • 04/05/2017 - 11:58am
    Variscite
  • 09/04/2017 - 4:47pm
    mwilmoth
  • 11/01/2017 - 12:02am
    tishacrayt
  • 11/01/2017 - 12:01am
    lashayduva
  • 10/01/2017 - 11:56pm
    neilheaney
  • 10/01/2017 - 11:53pm
    jennipurne
  • 10/01/2017 - 11:50pm
    relativ7
  • 17/10/2016 - 5:54am
    MDavidson67

KDE: Qt, Plasma, QML, Usability & Productivity

Filed under
KDE
  • Qt 5.11.1 and Plasma 5.13.1 in ktown ‘testing’ repository

    A couple of days ago I recompiled ‘poppler’ and the packages in ‘ktown’ that depend on it, and uploaded them into the repository as promised in my previous post.
    I did that because Slackware-current updated its own poppler package and mine needs to be kept in sync to prevent breakage in other parts of your Slackware computer. I hear you wonder, what is the difference between the Slackware poppler package and this ‘ktown’ package? Simple: my ‘poppler’ package contains support for Qt5 (in addition to the QT4 support in the original package) and that is required by other packages in the ‘ktown’ repository.

  • Sixth week of coding phase, GSoC'18

    The Menus API enables the QML Plugin to add an action, separator or menu to the WebView context menu. This API is not similar to the WebExtensions Menus API but is rather Falkonish!

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 24

    See all the names of people who worked hard to make the computing world a better place? That could be you next week! Getting involved isn’t all that tough, and there’s lots of support available.

Programming: Python Maths Tools and Java SE

Filed under
Development
  • Essential Free Python Maths Tools

    Python is a very popular general purpose programming language — with good reason. It’s object oriented, semantically structured, extremely versatile, and well supported. Scientists favour Python because it’s easy to use and learn, offers a good set of built-in features, and is highly extensible. Python’s readability makes it an excellent first programming language.

    The Python Standard Library (PSL) is the the standard library that’s distributed with Python. The library comes with, among other things, modules that carry out many mathematical operations.

    The math module is one of the core modules in PSL which performs mathematical operations. The module gives access to the underlying C library functions for floating point math.

  • Oracle's new Java SE subs: Code and support for $25/processor/month

    Oracle’s put a price on Java SE and support: $25 per processor per month, and $2.50 per user per month on the desktop, or less if you buy lots for a long time.

    Big Red’s called this a Java SE Subscription and pitched it as “a commonly used model, popular with Linux distributions”. The company also reckons the new deal is better than a perpetual licence, because they involve “an up-front cost plus additional annual support and maintenance fees.”

Linux 4.18 RC2 Released From China

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.18-rc2

    Another week, another -rc.

    I'm still traveling - now in China - but at least I'm doing this rc Sunday
    _evening_ local time rather than _morning_. And next rc I'll be back home
    and over rmy jetlag (knock wood) so everything should be back to the
    traditional schedule.

    Anyway, it's early in the rc series yet, but things look fairly normal.
    About a third of the patch is drivers (drm and s390 stand out, but here's
    networking and block updates too, and misc noise all over).

    We also had some of the core dma files move from drivers/base/dma-* (and
    lib/dma-*) to kernel/dma/*. We sometimes do code movement (and other
    "renaming" things) after the merge window simply because it tends to be
    less disruptive that way.

    Another 20% is under "tools" - mainly due to some selftest updates for
    rseq, but there's some turbostat and perf tooling work too.

    We also had some noticeable filesystem updates, particularly to cifs. I'm
    going to point those out, because some of them probably shouldn't have
    been in rc2. They were "fixes" not in the "regressions" sense, but in the
    "missing features" sense.

    So please, people, the "fixes" during the rc series really should be
    things that are _regressions_. If it used to work, and it no longer does,
    then fixing that is a good and proper fix. Or if something oopses or has a
    security implication, then the fix for that is a real fix.

    But if it's something that has never worked, even if it "fixes" some
    behavior, then it's new development, and that should come in during the
    merge window. Just because you think it's a "fix" doesn't mean that it
    really is one, at least in the "during the rc series" sense.

    Anyway, with that small rant out of the way, the rest is mostly arch
    updates (x86, powerpc, arm64, mips), and core networking.

    Go forth and test. Things look fairly sane, it's not really all that
    scary.

    Shortlog appended for people who want to scan through what changed.

    Linus

  • Linux 4.18-rc2 Released With A Normal Week's Worth Of Changes

    Due to traveling in China, Linus Torvalds has released the Linux 4.18-rc2 kernel a half-day ahead of schedule, but overall things are looking good for Linux 4.18.

A GTK+ 3 update

Filed under
GNOME
  • A GTK+ 3 update

    When we started development towards GTK+ 4, we laid out a plan that said GTK+ 3.22 would be the final, stable branch of GTK+ 3. And we’ve stuck to this for a while.

    I has served us reasonably well — GTK+ 3 stopped changing in drastic ways, which was well-received, and we are finally seeing applications moving from GTK+ 2.

  • GTK+ 3.24 To Deliver Some New Features While Waiting For GTK4

    While the GNOME tool-kit developers have been hard at work on GTK4 roughly the past two years and have kept GTK3 frozen at GTK+ 3.22, a GTK+ 3.24 release is now being worked on to deliver some new features until GTK+ 4.0 is ready to be released.

    While GTK+ 4.0 is shaping up well and GTK+ 3.22 was planned to be the last GTK3 stable release, the developers have had second thoughts due to GTK+ 4 taking time to mature. Some limited new features are being offered up in the GTK+ 3.24 release to debut this September.

Finally: First stable release of KBibTeX for KDE Frameworks 5

Filed under
KDE

After almost exactly two years of being work-in-progress, the first stable release of KBibTeX for KDE Frameworks 5 has been published! You can grab the sources at your local KDE mirror. Some distributions like ArchLinux already ship binary packages.

After one beta and one release candidate, now comes the final release.

You may wonder why this release gets version number 0.8.1 but not 0.8 as expected. This is simply due to the fact that I noticed a bug in CMakeLists.txt when computing version numbers which did not work if the version number just had two fields, i. e. no ‘patch’ version. As the code and the tag of 0.8 was already pushed, I had no alternative than to fix the problem and increase the version number. Otherwise, the ChangeLog (alternative view) is virtually unchanged compared to the last pre-release.

Read more

Peppermint OS Version 9 Released With New Features

Filed under
News

Ubuntu-based lightweight distribution, Peppermint has just released its version 9. Here’s a quick look at the changes in the new release.
Read more

Ubuntu Data Collection Report is Out! Read the Interesting Facts

Filed under
News

Ubuntu started collecting some basic, not-personally-identifiable system data starting with Ubuntu 18.04. Two months after Ubuntu 18.04 release, Canonical has shared some interesting stats.
Read more

Updated Debian 8: 8.11 released

Filed under
Debian

The Debian project is pleased to announce the eleventh (and final) update of its oldstable distribution Debian 8 (codename "jessie"). This point release mainly adds corrections for security issues, along with a few adjustments for serious problems. Security advisories have already been published separately and are referenced where available.

After this point release, Debian's Security and Release Teams will no longer be producing updates for Debian 8. Users wishing to continue to receive security support should upgrade to Debian 9, or see https://wiki.debian.org/LTS for details about the subset of architectures and packages covered by the Long Term Support project.

The packages for some architectures for DSA 3746, DSA 3944, DSA 3968, DSA 4010, DSA 4014, DSA 4061, DSA 4075, DSA 4102, DSA 4155, DSA 4209 and DSA 4218 are not included in this point release for technical reasons. All other security updates released during the lifetime of "jessie" that have not previously been part of a point release are included in this update.

Read more

Also: Debian 8.11 Released As The End Of The Line For Jessie

Red Hat Woes and Fedora 29 Plans

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Shares of open-source giant Red Hat pounded on weaker outlook
  • Fedora 29 Aims To Offer Up Modules For Everyone

    The latest Fedora 29 feature proposal is about offering "modules for everyone" across all Fedora editions.

    The "modules for everyone" proposal would make it where all Fedora installations have modular repositories enabled by default. Up to now the modular functionality was just enabled by default in Fedora Server 28.

    The modular functionality allows Fedora users to choose alternate versions of popular software, such as different versions of Node.js and other server software components where you might want to stick to a particular version.

GNU Make, FSFE Newsletter, and FSF's BLAG Removal

Filed under
GNU
  • Linux Fu: The Great Power of Make

    Over the years, Linux (well, the operating system that is commonly known as Linux which is the Linux kernel and the GNU tools) has become much more complicated than its Unix roots. That’s inevitable, of course. However, it means old-timers get to slowly grow into new features while new people have to learn all in one gulp. A good example of this is how software is typically built on a Linux system. Fundamentally, most projects use make — a program that tries to be smart about running compiles. This was especially important when your 100 MHz CPU connected to a very slow disk drive would take a day to build a significant piece of software. On the face of it, make is pretty simple. But today, looking at a typical makefile will give you a headache, and many projects use an abstraction over make that further obscures things.

  • FSFE Newsletter June 2018
  • About BLAG's removal from our list of endorsed distributions

    We recently updated our list of free GNU/Linux distributions to add a "Historical" section. BLAG Linux and GNU, based on Fedora, joined the list many years ago. But the maintainers no longer believe they can keep things running at this time. As such, they requested that they be removed from our list. The list helps users to find operating systems that come with only free software and documentation, and that do not promote any nonfree software. Being added to the list means that a distribution has gone through a rigorous screening process, and is dedicated to diligently fixing any freedom issues that may arise.

Servers: Kubernetes, Oracle's Cloudwashing and Embrace of ARM

Filed under
Server
  • Bloomberg Eschews Vendors For Direct Kubernetes Involvement

    Rather than use a managed Kubernetes service or employ an outsourced provider, Bloomberg has chosen to invest in deep Kubernetes expertise and keep the skills in-house. Like many enterprise organizations, Bloomberg originally went looking for an off-the-shelf approach before settling on the decision to get involved more deeply with the open source project directly.

    "We started looking at Kubernetes a little over two years ago," said Steven Bower, Data and Infrastructure Lead at Bloomberg. ... "It's a great execution environment for data science," says Bower. "The real Aha! moment for us was when we realized that not only does it have all these great base primitives like pods and replica sets, but you can also define your own primitives and custom controllers that use them."

  • Oracle is changing how it reports cloud revenues, what's it hiding? [iophk: "probably Microsoft doing this too" (cloudwashing)]

     

    In short: Oracle no longer reports specific revenue for cloud PaaS, IaaS and SaaS, instead bundling them all into one reporting line which it calls 'cloud services and licence support'. This line pulled in 60% of total revenue for the quarter at $6.8 billion, up 8% year-on-year, for what it's worth.

  • Announcing the general availability of Oracle Linux 7 for ARM

    Oracle is pleased to announce the general availability of Oracle Linux 7 for the ARM architecture.

  • Oracle Linux 7 Now Ready For ARM Servers

    While Red Hat officially launched RHEL7 for ARM servers last November, on Friday Oracle finally announced the general availability of their RHEL7-derived Oracle Linux 7 for ARM.

    Oracle Linux 7 Update 5 is available for ARM 64-bit (ARMv8 / AArch64), including with their new Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel Release 5 based on Linux 4.14.

Graphics: XWayland, Ozone-GBM, Freedreno, X.Org, RadeonSI

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • The Latest Batch Of XWayland / EGLStream Improvements Merged

    While the initial EGLStreams-based support for using the NVIDIA proprietary driver with XWayland was merged for the recent X.Org Server 1.20 release, the next xorg-server release will feature more improvements.

  • Making Use Of Chrome's Ozone-GBM Intel Graphics Support On The Linux Desktop

    Intel open-source developer Joone Hur has provided a guide about using the Chrome OS graphics stack on Intel-based Linux desktop systems.

    In particular, using the Chrome OS graphics stack on the Linux desktop is primarily about using the Ozone-GBM back-end to Ozone that allows for direct interaction with Intel DRM/KMS support and evdev for input.

  • Freedreno Reaches OpenGL ES 3.1 Support, Not Far From OpenGL 3.3

    The Freedreno Gallium3D driver now supports all extensions required by OpenGL ES 3.1 and is also quite close to supporting desktop OpenGL 3.3.

  • X.Org Is Looking For A North American Host For XDC2019

    If software development isn't your forte but are looking to help out a leading open-source project while logistics and hospitality are where you excel, the X.Org Foundation is soliciting bids for the XDC2019 conference.

    The X.Org Foundation is looking for proposals where in North America that the annual X.Org Developers' Conference should be hosted in 2019. This year it's being hosted in Spain and with the usual rotation it means that in 2019 they will jump back over the pond.

  • RadeonSI Compatibility Profile Is Close To OpenGL 4.4 Support

    It was just a few days ago that the OpenGL compatibility profile support in Mesa reached OpenGL 3.3 compliance for RadeonSI while now thanks to the latest batch of patches from one of the Valve Linux developers, it's soon going to hit OpenGL 4.4.

    Legendary open-source graphics driver contributor Timothy Arceri at Valve has posted 11 more patches for advancing RadeonSI's OpenGL compatibility profile support, the alternative context to the OpenGL core profile that allows mixing in deprecated OpenGL functionality. The GL compatibility profile mode is generally used by long-standing workstation software and also a small subset of Linux games.

Software, KDE and GNOME Leftovers

Filed under
KDE
Software
GNOME
  • Drawing Feynman Diagrams for Fun and Profit with JaxoDraw

    When first developed, theoretical physics was mostly done either with pen and paper or on a chalkboard. Not much thought was given as to how you could render these drawings within a document being written on a computer. JaxoDraw is meant to help fill in that gap in document layout and provide the ability to render these drawings correctly and give output you can use in your own documents.

    JaxoDraw is written in Java, so it should run under almost any operating system. Unfortunately, it isn't likely to be in the package repository for most distributions, so you'll need to download it from the project's website. But, because it's packaged as a jar file, it's relatively easy to run.

  • Kodi v18 Leia - Alpha 2

    We have been relatively quiet for a while and several months have past since the first pre-release Alpha build. Today we present you the second official Alpha build in this pre-release trilogy. It is a continuation of the first one which was released beginning of March and contains our continous battle against the dark side that consist of bugs and usability problems.

  • Kodi 18 Alpha 2 Released With Stability & Usability Improvements + New Wayland Code

    It's been a few months since the Kodi 18 Alpha while available today is the second alpha release of this major update to the open-source, cross-platform HTPC software.

    Kodi developers have been spending the past few months working on a range of stability and usability enhancements to this software formerly known as XBMC. Kodi 18's latest additions include live TV viewing improvements, Windows support improvements, continued Android integration enhancements, re-introducing Wayland protocol support, video player enhancements, and more.

  • LibreOffice color selector as GTK widgets

    Here's what the native GTK widget mode for the color picker looks like at the moment under Wayland. A GtkMenuButton displaying a color preview of the currently selected color and a GtkPopover containing the color selection widgetry.

  • TenFourFox FPR8 available

    TenFourFox Feature Parity Release 8 final is now available (downloads, hashes, release notes). There are no changes from the beta except for outstanding security patches. As usual, it will go live Monday night, assuming no changes.

KDE:

  • Latte Dock, Beta 1 for v0.8 (v0.7.95)

    Hello everyone Latte Dock v0.7.95 which is the first beta of v0.8 is here. Latte v0.8 is a huge release and one of its main goals is to make the user feel with it very natural and comfortable.

    [...]

    Important for contributors: Beta1 will last 10 days, during these days translators will be able to report string improvements at bugs.kde.org. English isnt my native language, (proof reading / simpler expanations) might be necessary. When Beta2 is released around 3 to 5 July the string freeze will take place. Beta2 period will last 10 more days. So v0.8 is scheduled for 13 to 15 Jully. During all these days improvements and fixes can be landed through review process at kde phabricator.

  • Musing About Communities Size And Activity

    If you remember my previous installment I raised a couple more questions which I pointed out as tougher to address and I'd keep on the side for a while. Well, I decided to look at something simpler in the meantime... which unexpectedly took more time than expected.

    First I thought I'd try to reproduce the cohesion graph from Paul's Akademy 2014 talk... but it looks like we have a reproducibility issue on that one. However hard I try I don't manage to reproduce it. What I get is very different, so either there's a bug in my tentative script or there was a bug in Paul's script or somehow the input data is different. So one more mysteries to explore, I'm at a loss about what's going on with that one so far.

  • Second Post and First Weekly

    Because of the last one, I have been refactoring related code in the last month. The refactoring is generally completed, with KisDlgInternalColorSelector being the last dependency that haven’t been moved to enable KisPaletteView to be used everywhere needed.

GNOME:

  • Ubuntu Developers Working On Improvements To GNOME Software Store

    Canonical/Ubuntu developers are working on improvements to the GNOME Software "app store" and recently held an in-person design sprint along with one upstream GNOME developer for coming up with improvements.

    The Ubuntu developers working on improvements to GNOME Software were joined by prolific GNOME contributor Richard Hughes for brainstorming improvements to better GNOME Software over the months to come.

  • App Launching From GNOME Shell Now More Robust Under Memory Pressure & Faster

    Right now on systems with low amounts of available system memory, GNOME Shell can sometimes fail to launch applications due to an error over not being able to allocate memory in the fork process. With the latest rounds of Glib optimizations, this should no longer be the case.

  • GNOME Web Browser is Adding a Reader Mode

    An experimental reader mode will ship in the next version of GNOME Web, aka Epiphany. The feature is already available to try in the latest development builds of the GTK Webkit-based web browser, released this week as part of the GNOME 3.29.3 milestone.

Wine 3.11 Released and Turok Remastered Roars on to Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming
  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine development release 3.11 is now available.

  • Wine 3.11 Brings Debugging Support For WoW64 Processes, Better Reporting Of HT CPUs

    Wine 3.11 is now available as the newest bi-weekly development release of this software for running Windows programs/games/applications on Linux and other operating systems.

    With Wine 3.11 there is better debugger support for WoW64 (Windows 32-bit on Windows 64-bit) processes, support for SHA256/SHA384 hashes inside ECDSA signatures, better reporting of virtual CPU cores via Hyper Threading / SMT, improvements to the standard Task Dialog, and a total of 12 known bug fixes.

  • Turok Remastered Roars on to Linux

    A remastered version of ‘Turok: Dinosaur Hunter’ has arrived on Linux.

    The game first found fame on the Nintendo 64 back way back in 1997, where it helped define the fledgling first-person shooter genre for an entire generation of gamers.

    Now a high-definition, remastered port is available to play on Linux, having stomped its way on to the Xbox One in May,

Ubuntu 18.04 Telemetry, Peppermint 9, Linux Mint 19

Filed under
Ubuntu
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More in Tux Machines

A GTK+ 3 update

  • A GTK+ 3 update
    When we started development towards GTK+ 4, we laid out a plan that said GTK+ 3.22 would be the final, stable branch of GTK+ 3. And we’ve stuck to this for a while. I has served us reasonably well — GTK+ 3 stopped changing in drastic ways, which was well-received, and we are finally seeing applications moving from GTK+ 2.
  • GTK+ 3.24 To Deliver Some New Features While Waiting For GTK4
    While the GNOME tool-kit developers have been hard at work on GTK4 roughly the past two years and have kept GTK3 frozen at GTK+ 3.22, a GTK+ 3.24 release is now being worked on to deliver some new features until GTK+ 4.0 is ready to be released. While GTK+ 4.0 is shaping up well and GTK+ 3.22 was planned to be the last GTK3 stable release, the developers have had second thoughts due to GTK+ 4 taking time to mature. Some limited new features are being offered up in the GTK+ 3.24 release to debut this September.

Finally: First stable release of KBibTeX for KDE Frameworks 5

After almost exactly two years of being work-in-progress, the first stable release of KBibTeX for KDE Frameworks 5 has been published! You can grab the sources at your local KDE mirror. Some distributions like ArchLinux already ship binary packages. After one beta and one release candidate, now comes the final release. You may wonder why this release gets version number 0.8.1 but not 0.8 as expected. This is simply due to the fact that I noticed a bug in CMakeLists.txt when computing version numbers which did not work if the version number just had two fields, i. e. no ‘patch’ version. As the code and the tag of 0.8 was already pushed, I had no alternative than to fix the problem and increase the version number. Otherwise, the ChangeLog (alternative view) is virtually unchanged compared to the last pre-release. Read more

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