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Thursday, 12 Dec 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Zorin OS 15.1 is Released: A Better Way to Work, Learn and Play

Filed under
OS
Linux

Just over 6 months ago, we launched Zorin OS 15, our most advanced and refined operating system ever. Since then, it’s been downloaded over 550,000 times around the world. Over 65% of these downloads were coming from Windows and macOS, reflecting our mission to bring the power of Linux to people who’ve never had access to it before. We would like to take this opportunity to thank every one of you for making this release as big and impactful as it has been.

Today, we’re excited to announce that Zorin OS is getting even better with the release of version 15.1. We’ve paid close attention to your feedback and worked hard to make the desktop experience better for work, learning, playing, and everything in between. We’ve focused on making the desktop feel even more familiar and user-friendly to new users, especially those moving away from Windows 7 leading up to the end of its support in one month.

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Also: Zorin OS 15.1 Released with Better Microsoft Office Compatibility, GameMode

Zorin OS 15.1 Released with LibreOffice 6.3, Dark Mode Scheduling

Nvidia Linux/BSD Graphics Driver Adds Support for Quadro T2000 with Max-Q Design

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
BSD

Coming just three weeks after the Nvidia 440.36 driver, which introduced support for the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1650 SUPER graphics card, the Nvidia 440.44 graphics driver is here to add support for the Nvidia Quadro T2000 with Max-Q Design graphics card on Linux, BSD, and Solaris systems, as well as support for the __GL_SYNC_DISPLAY_DEVICE environment variable for Vulkan apps on GNU/Linux systems.

The Nvidia 440.44 proprietary graphics driver also improves installation support on Oracle Linux 7.7 systems where the Nvidia kernel module could fail to build with the "unknown type name 'vm_fault_t'" error, and addresses a bug discovered in an error handling path, which could cause a Linux kernel crash while loading the nvidia.ko module.

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Proteus Device is a secure, Linux-based handheld (not a smartphone)

Filed under
Linux

The Proteus Device from XXLSEC is a handheld computer with a 5 inch touchscreen display and a secure, Linux-based operating system called PriveOS.

At first glance, it looks a lot like a smartphone. But the Proteus Device does not have a cellular modem and it’s not designed to make phone calls.

What it does have that you won’t find on most phones, is an Ethernet port.

Read more

Why secure web-based applications with Kali Linux?

Filed under
Linux
Web

The security of web-based applications is of critical importance. The strength of an application is about more than the collection of features it provides. It includes essential (yet often overlooked) elements such as security.

Kali Linux is a trusted critical component of a security professional’s toolkit for securing web applications. The official documentation says it is “is specifically geared to meet the requirements of professional penetration testing and security auditing.“ Incidences of security breaches in web-based applications can be largely contained through the deployment of Kali Linux’s suite of up-to-date software.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Which Ubuntu Release (2010-2019) is Your Favourite? Vote Now!

    With the end of the year, and indeed the decade, fast approaching I’ve been spending my time looking backwards, getting all misty-eyed and nostalgic about Ubuntu and how far its come since 2010.

  • OpenBSD Local Privilege Escalation Vulnerability (CVE-2019-19726)

    This vulnerability exists in OpenBSD’s dynamic loader versions of OpenBSD 6.5 and OpenBSD 6.6. It is exploitable in the default installation (via the set-user-ID executable chpass or passwd) and could allow local users or malicious software to gain full root privileges. For more technical details on this vulnerability, please see our security advisory. Also refer to our recently published OpenBSD blog post.

  • Microsoft begins Windows 10's 1809-to-1909 compulsory upgrade

    Microsoft has begun forcibly upgrading Windows 10 PCs running version 1809 with the latest, the November 2019 Update, aka 1909, which the company launched less than a month ago.

  • Xs:code launches subscription platform to monetize open-source projects [Ed: This is basically about making proprietary software add-ons, betraying Free software premises]

    Open source is a great source of free tools for developers, but as these projects proliferate, and some gain in popularity, the creators sometimes look for ways to monetize successful ones. The problem is that it’s hard to run a subscription-based, dual-license approach, and most developers don’t even know where to start. Enter Israeli startup xs:code, which has created a platform to help developers solve this problem.

    “Xs:code is a monetization platform for open-source projects. Unlike donation platforms which are pretty popular today, xs:code allows open-source developers to provide added value in exchange for payments. That comes on top of what they offer for free. This added value can be a different license, more features, support services or anything they can think of,” Netanel Mohoni, co-founder and CEO of xs:code told TechCrunch.

    This does not mean the open-source part of this goes away, only that the company is providing a platform for those developers who want to monetize their work, Mohoni said. “Companies pay for accessing the code, and they enjoy better software created by motivated developers who are now compensated for their work. Because our solution makes sure that the code remains open source, developers can continue accepting contributions so the community enjoys better code than ever before,” he explained.

  • The Linux Foundation's Automated Compliance Work Garners New Funding, Advances Tools Development [Ed: Of course the Linux Foundation is still promoting Microsoft GitHub (proprietary) and outsourcing everything to it]
  • The Linux Foundation’s Automated Compliance Work Garners New Funding, Advances Tools Development [Ed: The Corporate Linux Foundation is again whitewashing and openwashing a major GPL violator, VMware]

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced founding member commitments from Google, Siemens and VMware for the Automated Compliance Tooling (ACT), as well as key advancements for tools that increase ease and adoption of open source software.

    Using open source code comes with a responsibility to comply with the terms of that code’s license. The goal of ACT is to consolidate investments in these efforts and to increase interoperability and usability of open source compliance tooling. Google, Siemens and VMware are among the companies helping to underwrite and lead this collaborative work.

  • If you ARIA label something, give it a role

    As a rule of thumb, if you label something via aria-label or aria-labelledby, make sure it has a proper widget or landmark role.

    The longer version is that several elements created extraneous amount of announcements in screen readers in the past that were not really useful. Especially in the ARIA 1.0 days where a lot of things weren’t as clear and people were still gathering experience, this was an issue for elements or roles that mapped to regions, multiple landmarks of the same type on a page, etc. Therefore, best practice has become to label both widgets (which should be labeled anyway), and landmarks with means such as aria-label or aria-labelledby, to make them more useful.

  • Twitter Makes A Bet On Protocols Over Platforms

    It looks like Twitter is making a bet on protocols over platforms for its future.

Latte bug fix release v0.9.5

Filed under
KDE

Latte Dock v0.9.5 has been released containing important fixes and improvements!

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HP Linux Imaging & Printing Drivers Are Now Supported on Debian GNU/Linux 10.2

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

HP Linux Imaging and Printing (HPLIP) software, an open-source and free print, scan and fax driver solution for HP printers and scanners, has been updated today to version 3.19.12 for Linux-based operating systems.
HPLIP 3.19.12 is here to add support for several new printers, including HP Color LaserJet Pro M256dn, HP Color LaserJet Pro M255dn, HP Color LaserJet Pro M256nw, HP Color LaserJet Pro M255nw, HP Color LaserJet Pro M256dw, HP Color LaserJet Pro M255dw, HP Color LaserJet Pro M155a, HP Color LaserJet Pro M156a, HP Color LaserJet Pro M155nw, HP Color LaserJet Pro M156nw, HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M282nw, and HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M284nw.

Additionally, HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M283fdn, HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M285fdn, HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M283fdw, HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M285fdw, HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M283cdw, HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M285cdw, HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M182n, HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M184n, HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M182nw, HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M184nw, HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M183fw, and HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M185fw are also supported by the new version.

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Also: HPLIP 3.19.12 Released with New Printers Support

AMD Radeon RX 5500 XT Linux Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

AMD today is shipping the Radeon RX 5500 XT as the new sub-$200 Navi graphics card. This 7nm graphics card offers 22 compute units, 1408 stream processors, up to 5.6 TFLOPS of compute power, 4GB or 8GB GDDR6 video memory options, and built atop their modern RDNA architecture and supporting features in common with the RX 5700 series like PCIe 4.0 support. Here is a look at the initial Linux gaming performance of the AMD Radeon RX 5500 XT with various gaming benchmarks and Steam Play tests as well.

The Radeon RX 5500 XT 4GB version is launching at $169 USD while the Radeon RX 5500 XT 8GB version will command $199 USD. These price points put them comparable to the current Radeon RX 580 / 590 retail cards. AMD markets the RX 5500 XT as offering 1.6x the performance-per-Watt of the original Polaris Radeon RX 480 and designed for 1080p gaming to go up against NVIDIA's GeForce GTX 1650 SUPER graphics card.

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KDE's December 2019 Apps Update

Filed under
KDE

The release of new versions for KDE applications is part of KDE’s continued effort to bring you a complete and up-to-date catalog of fully-featured, beautiful and useful programs for your system.

Available now are new versions of KDE’s file browser Dolphin; Kdenlive, one of the most complete open source video editors; the document viewer Okular; KDE’s image viewer, Gwenview; and all of your other favorite KDE apps and utilities. All of these applications have been improved, making them faster and more stable and they boast exciting new features. The new versions of KDE applications let you be productive and creative, while at the same time making use of KDE software easy and fun.

We hope you enjoy all the novel features and improvements worked into all of KDE’s apps!

Read more

Also: KDE Applications 19.12 Open-Source Software Suite Released, Here's What's New

KDE Applications 19.12 Released With Big Improvements To Kdenlive + Other KDE Programs

Games: Feral Interactive, Fantasy Strike, GNU/Linux as Gaming Platform

Filed under
Gaming
  • Seems like Feral Interactive may have a few surprises for Linux in 2020

    Porting studio Feral Interactive [Official Site] have already given Linux a lot of games and it sounds like more are coming.

    While this year they've already released Shadow of the Tomb Raider Definitive Edition, a Vulkan beta for Shadow of Mordor, Total War: THREE KINGDOMS and DiRT 4 plus plus big updates/expansions to Company of Heroes 2 and Total War: WARHAMMER II. Still to come is Life is Strange 2, which Feral previously teased to arrive sometime soon.

  • Fighting game Fantasy Strike adds full cross-platform online play with PC and Consoles

    The very pretty fighting game Fantasy Strike from Sirlin Games just got a great update, enabling cross-platform online play between Linux/macOS/Windows and the Nintendo Switch and Playstation 4 consoles.

    Apply to all online modes including Casual and Ranked, find a match should be a lot easier now. You can also challenge or spectate others from your in-game friends list, which also works across all platforms too as you can add people from any platform based on tags.

  • Looking towards other operating systems

    Learning a new operating system from scratch is a daunting experience for many people. Fortunately, there are a few Linux distributions that come with a Windows-like desktop environment such as a form of a star bar at the bottom. However, Windows and Linux operating on vastly different philosophies, to the way that they are organized to the way that the files are handled. Linux employs the traditional monolithic kernel and it provides a hierarchical view of the files. Because it is modular, most of the necessary drivers can be loaded and unloaded dynamically. One of the major appeals of Linux is that it is open-source, compared to Microsoft which is a closed and inaccessible environment. Windows is made for simple and out of the box use and directed toward inexperienced users, a reason why the OS has been adopted by so many people. Linux puts more emphasis on the user, who has the possibility of customizing the desktop environment to suit their needs. Windows also offer a few, but fairly limited customization options.

    The main reason why people avoid switching to Linux is their gaming habits. Linux is known for not playing well with most PC games. Most PC games are being developed with Windows as the main platforms with some companies providing Linux support sometime after the original release. Games that do not have a Linux release require third party compatibility applications to run Windows games. The major application that is used to play Windows games on Linux is Wine. The developers of Wine have specified that the software is not an emulator but more of a compatibility layer for Linux to run Windows programs, not just games. In the world of programming, Wine is considered a masterpiece and one of the greatest feats of open source development that allows most Windows binaries to run on Linux without relying on any of Microsoft’s dependencies. Most of the Wine resources are dedicated to running the complicated frameworks of various DirectX components.

    [...]

    Many people prefer to enjoy online gaming, especially casino games. The beauty of these games is that most are available and can be played directly in the browser. The default browser that Linux uses is Mozilla Firefox, which itself, is a powerful browser. Because online casinos are played directly in the browser, there is almost no difference between playing them on Linux and playing them in Windows. There are also casino games that can be downloaded with most of them being made to run only on Windows due to a large number of people using the OS. As mentioned before, to run most Windows software, players have the option to use WINE. However, since because playing the casinos using the browser, most people are better off sticking with that version. Many games from online roulette to poker, and other table games are available online. Almost all online casinos found online have the option to play instantly with no download required, which is why any OS that can run a browser is perfectly capable to run casino games. Linux has been around for a long time, but it was only in the last 10 years that people have started noticing the operating system becoming more friendlier and easy to learn. Besides the many desktop environments, customizability, community and growing compatibility of games, as well as more security, many have started the transition from Windows to Linux.

Servers: Kubernetes, SUSE and Red Hat

Filed under
Server
  • Creating Kubernetes distributions

    Making a comparison between Linux and Kubernetes is often one of apples to oranges. There are, however, some similarities and there is an effort within the Kubernetes community to make Kubernetes more like a Linux distribution. The idea was outlined in a session about Kubernetes release engineering at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America 2019. "You might have heard that Kubernetes is the Linux of the cloud and that's like super easy to say, but what does it mean? Cloud is pretty fuzzy on its own," Tim Pepper, the Kubernetes release special interest group (SIG Release) co-chair said. He proceeded to provide some clarity on how the two projects are similar.

    Pepper explained that Kubernetes is a large open-source project with lots of development work around a relatively monolithic core. The core of Kubernetes doesn't work entirely on its own and relies on other components around it to enable a workload to run, in a model that isn't all that dissimilar to a Linux distribution. Likewise, Pepper noted that Linux also has a monolithic core, which is the kernel itself. Alongside the Linux kernel is a whole host of other components that are chosen to work together to form a Linux distribution. Much like a Linux distribution, a Kubernetes distribution is a package of core components, configuration, networking, and storage on which application workloads can be deployed.

    Linux has community distributions, such as Debian, where there is a group of people that help to build the distribution, as well as a community of users that can install and run the distribution on their own. Pepper argued that there really isn't a community Kubernetes distribution like Debian, one that uses open-source tools to build a full Kubernetes platform that can then be used by anyone to run their workloads. With Linux, community-led distributions have become the foundation for user adoption and participation, whereas with Kubernetes today, distributions are almost all commercially driven.

  • The total cost of software-defined storage

    In the current economic climate, the cost of everything is often closely examined to be sure we’re not paying too much. However, many focus on just the cost of acquisition – the capital expenditure – as opposed to looking at the bigger picture – the total cost of ownership, or TCO.

    In the world of IT, it’s easy to forget that the cost of owning servers, networking and storage equipment is more than the purchase price of the hardware. The total cost also includes installation, software licenses, service, support, training and upgrades amongst other things.

  • Red Hat Gets NIST Recertification for ‘Enterprise Linux’ Operating System; Paul Smith Quoted

    A Red Hat operating system offering has earned recertification that validates the platform's capacity to process sensitive information in line with National Institute of Standards and Technology requirements.

    Red Hat said Tuesday it renewed Federal Information Processing Standard 140-2 cryptography certification for the Enterprise Linux 7.6 software built to support agencies and organizations in government-regulated industries.

Debian: Systemd and Astronomy

Filed under
Debian
  • Enrico Zini: Init systems documentation

    Systemd has an excellent reference documentation in its manpages, but it does a lot of things, and a reference documentation isn't the best starting point for getting introduced to them.

    I would like to see a bit more documentation of the kind that sits between a systemctl start|stop|status and the reference manpages. Things like simple HOWTO posts on how to get a simple job done, or high-level explanations of how some specific feature works.

    I put some of what I know and used (or wrote) into systemd/documentation, I'll try to add to it when I find more, and I encourage you to do the same.

  • Debian Begins Vote On Supporting Non-Systemd Init Choices

    There’s detailed descriptions of every possibility on the Debian builders mailing checklist. “It is a non-secret vote,” the publish explains. “After the voting interval is over the main points on who voted what can be printed.”

  • Astronomy!

    Starting in January of 2020, I will be joining the Data Management team (specifically the Science Quality and Reliability Engineering team) for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

    There's a much longer description at the above Wikipedia link and also at LSST's own site, but the short version is that the mission of LSST is to survey the entire southern night sky about twice a week for ten years. This in turn will provide vast amounts of data that will be used to do wide-ranging research in astronomy. All of that data requires indexing and processing so that scientists can use it. The team I'm joining is applying current software engineering techniques (containers, Jupyter notebooks, continuous integration, and so on) to that problem.

    For me, this is an opportunity to return to the academic, non-profit world that's always been my first love. It's also an opportunity to learn a bunch of new things (astronomy, for the most obvious, and scientific research computing more generally, but also some areas of technology that I've never had enough time to explore). Even better, everything my new team does is free software and is developed on GitHub, which means I'll be returning to a job where free software is at the center of the work instead of an optional side project for which there's rarely time.

Programming: PHP, C++, Python and More

Filed under
Development
  • Excellent Free Tutorials to Learn PHP

    PHP has been at the helm of the web for many years. It’s an extremely popular, interpreted scripting language that is ideally suited for web development in part because it has an approachable syntax and supports different operating systems. This language powers millions of web sites on the net and is extremely well supported by its user community.

    PHP is also used as a general-purpose programming language. PHP code can be executed with a command-line interface (CLI) and to implement standalone graphical applications. CLI PHP programs often automate common tasks such as testing, deployment, and application administration. The language offers a very complete set of object-oriented programming features as well as support for functional programming. The latest TIOBE Index (August 2019 at time of writing) ranks PHP in 8th place, behind Java, C, C++, C#, Python, Visual Basic .NET, and JavaScript.

    The language is released under a non-copyleft free software license / open source license. The latest stable version adds lots of new features.

  • Intel's MKL-DNN/DNNL 2.0 Beta 3 Release Adds SYCL + Data Parallel C++ Compiler

    Intel's MKL-DNN Deep Neural Network Library (DNNL) that is open-source and catering to deep learning applications like Tensorflow, PyTorch, DeepLearning4J, and others is nearing its version 2.0 release. With DNNL 2.0 is now support for Data Parallel C++ as Intel's new language as part of their oneAPI initiative.

    MKL-DNN/DNNL 2.0 Beta 3 was released on Wednesday and to my knowledge is their first public test release of the forthcoming 2.0. Notable with DNNL 2.0 is supporting SYCL API extensions and interoperability now with SYCL code, the single-source C++-based programming language backed by The Khronos Group and a crucial to Intel's new oneAPI initiative.

  • Watch this machine made out of Lego sort other Lego using AI

    Dubbed the “Universal Lego Sorting Machine” by its creator, Daniel West, it’s a pretty neat contraption that’s far more useful than any of the Lego science projects I used to make. The machine is apparently able to use AI to sort Lego into one of 18 different buckets at a rate of “about one brick every two seconds.” West says he trained the neural network that sorts the bricks using 3D images of Lego parts, and he says the network can learn to recognize any piece as long as there’s a 3D image to train on.

  • Reactive programming, a new way of thinking

    Get to know Reactive Programming and Grace Jansen, co-author of a new O'Reilly report that introduces Reactive and Reactive Architecture.

    [...]

    At Devoxx Belgium, Grace gave a number of talks, including one about Reactive programming and the pitfalls, entitled “Reacting to the future of application architecture.” In the talk, she uses an analogy from biology, namely how bees live and function together. “I compare the behavior of bees with how we would like applications to function and meet the requirements and expectations of users.”

  • Future-proof monolithic applications with modular design

    DevNation tech talks are hosted by the Red Hat technologists who create our products. These sessions include real solutions and code and sample projects to help you get started. In this talk, you’ll learn about future-proofing applications from Eric Murphy and Ales Nosek, Architects with Red Hat Consulting.

    When building an MVP software application, you may immediately jump to a microservices architecture because it’s the new norm for building cloud-native applications. You may also be skeptical about starting off with a monolith because of the perception of such applications as relics of the past.

  • Merge Sort in Python

    Merge Sort is one of the most famous sorting algorithms. If you're studying Computer Science, Merge Sort, alongside Quick Sort is likely the first efficient, general-purpose sorting algorithm you have heard of. It is also a classic example of a divide-and-conquer category of algorithms.

  • Updates on Unoon in December 2019

    This Saturday evening, I sat with Unoon project after a few weeks, I was continuously running it, but, did not resume the development effort. This time Bhavin also joined me. Together, we fixed a location of the whitelist files issue, and unoon now also has a database (using SQLite), which stores all the historical process and connection information. In the future, we will provide some way to query this information.

  • Summarising, Aggregating, and Grouping data in Python Pandas

    In this post, I will talk about summarizing techniques that can be used to compile and understand the data. I will use Python library Pandas to summarize, group and aggregate the data in different ways.

    I will be using college.csv data which has details about university admissions.

Open Hardware/Modding: Raspberry Pi 3, RISC-V Foundation and More

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • $38 Compute Module PoE Board Works with Raspberry Pi CM3/CM3+ Modules

    Raspberry Pi 3 Compute Module was first introduced in 2017 with CM3 and CM3L systems-on-module with or without 4GB eMMC flash for $25 and up before the company launched an update earlier this year...

  • IoT ugly Christmas sweaters

    If there’s one thing we Brits love, it’s an ugly Christmas sweater. Jim Bennett, a Senior Cloud Advocate at Microsoft, has taken his ugly sweater game to the next level by adding IoT-controlled, Twitter-connected LEDs thanks to a Raspberry Pi Zero.

  • A Look at Ubuntu on MINIX NEO G41V-4 and J50C-4 Mini PCs
  • iCommSemi SV6166F is a Low-Power WiFi SoC for IoT and Embedded Systems
  • RISC-V Foundation Says Goodbye to the United States

    For over thirty years U.S. companies have enjoyed a home court advantage in developing information and communications technology (ICT) standards. Specifically, the overwhelming majority of the more than five hundred consortia founded over the last thirty-five years to develop ICT standards have been formed under U.S. laws and headquartered in the U.S. That’s hardly a surprise because the vast majority of the companies that founded these same consortia were also American companies. Now the times may be a-changing.

    The ability to form and maintain standards consortia in the founders’ backyards provides significant advantages. They include convenience, reduced travel costs, predictability of legal results, choice of language, demonstration of national leadership, standardization of governance structures and more. For decades, foreign companies were amenable to this practice, so long as a sufficient percentage of face to face meetings were held outside the U.S.

    That tolerance began to erode after 9/11. New security measures made crossing the U.S. border more tedious, sometimes even requiring fingerprinting as a precondition to entry. Some members couldn’t obtain visas at all, an issue that became more critical as Chinese companies became more active in standards development. Privacy concerns also escalated, leading to European objections to hosting the information of its citizens in the U.S. at all. Those concerns were temporarily abated when new rules were put in place, but anxieties have heightened again – this time with the U.S. as well as in Europe – over the privacy policies of the largest U.S. IT companies.

    This year, concerns increased again when ZTE, and then Huawei and scores of that Chinese company’s affiliates, were added to the U.S. “Entity List.” Huawei and its affiliates are reportedly members of over 400 ICT standards organizations, each of which was suddenly tasked with figuring out which of its activities, if any, it could now permit the Chinese companies to participate in.

Graphics: AMD, Intel, Vulkan/Flycast and NVIDIA

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • AMD Publishes Vega 7nm ISA Documentation - 300 More Pages Of GPU Docs

    Beyond AMD's open-source graphics driver stack of the past decade, part of their original open-source plans have also involved providing public (NDA-free) GPU hardware documentation. That has come with time though the documentation drops are not coordinated in-step with code drops. Out today, for example, is the ISA documentation on Vega 7nm.

    Back in 2017 was the timely release of the Vega ISA documentation and earlier this summer was even the RDNA 1.0 ISA documentation but missing out until now was the Vega 7nm ISA documentation.

  • Intel's Iris Gallium3D Driver Continuing To See Performance Optimizations On Mesa 20.0

    With the current Mesa 19.3 there is the Intel Gallium3D driver generally performing much better than their "classic" i965 driver and for Mesa 20.0 it looks to only make more ground as it switches over to this driver by default.

    Beyond the recent build system changes for supporting an Intel Gallium3D default and building it as part of the default x86/x86_64 Gallium3D drivers with hopes of soon flipping the switch for Broadwell and newer, more performance optimizations are still being done.

  • Dreamcast emulator Flycast adds a Vulkan renderer

    There seems to be quite a lot of interest in Vulkan lately, as more projects begin using it. Now we have the Dreamcast emulator Flycast adding Vulkan support.

    In the technical blog post announcing it on the Libretro site, it gives a bit of brief history of the Dreamcast GPU and mentions the usual "less overhead, more reliability and better performance in many cases" when it comes to using Vulkan although it's a lot more complicated to use.

  • NVIDIA have two new Linux drivers available, one stable and one Vulkan Beta

    NVIDIA continue pushing their drivers forwards with two new Linux driver updates available. Let's take a quick look.

    First, the stable 440.44 driver release as part of their long-lived branch. This adds support for the Quadro T2000 with Max-Q Design, you can now use the "__GL_SYNC_DISPLAY_DEVICE" environment variable for Vulkan applications and it fixes a few bugs like tearing with a G-SYNC or G-SYNC Compatible monitor when you've got something running directly on a display (like VR).

Watch these videos from the Linux App Summit

Filed under
Linux

For some, the holidays are a hectic time of shopping, cooking, and a house overflowing with loved ones. For others, they’re quiet times spent with just a few friends, or even in solitude behind the warm glow of a computer monitor. And for still others, it’s a workday like any other.

No matter how you end up spending the holiday season this year, there’s comfort to be found in the Linux App Summit of 2019. This summit, which combined the strengths of everyone involved in developing applications for Linux, focused on a few major topics...

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More in Tux Machines

Proteus Device is a secure, Linux-based handheld (not a smartphone)

The Proteus Device from XXLSEC is a handheld computer with a 5 inch touchscreen display and a secure, Linux-based operating system called PriveOS. At first glance, it looks a lot like a smartphone. But the Proteus Device does not have a cellular modem and it’s not designed to make phone calls. What it does have that you won’t find on most phones, is an Ethernet port. Read more

Why secure web-based applications with Kali Linux?

The security of web-based applications is of critical importance. The strength of an application is about more than the collection of features it provides. It includes essential (yet often overlooked) elements such as security. Kali Linux is a trusted critical component of a security professional’s toolkit for securing web applications. The official documentation says it is “is specifically geared to meet the requirements of professional penetration testing and security auditing.“ Incidences of security breaches in web-based applications can be largely contained through the deployment of Kali Linux’s suite of up-to-date software. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Which Ubuntu Release (2010-2019) is Your Favourite? Vote Now!

    With the end of the year, and indeed the decade, fast approaching I’ve been spending my time looking backwards, getting all misty-eyed and nostalgic about Ubuntu and how far its come since 2010.

  • OpenBSD Local Privilege Escalation Vulnerability (CVE-2019-19726)

    This vulnerability exists in OpenBSD’s dynamic loader versions of OpenBSD 6.5 and OpenBSD 6.6. It is exploitable in the default installation (via the set-user-ID executable chpass or passwd) and could allow local users or malicious software to gain full root privileges. For more technical details on this vulnerability, please see our security advisory. Also refer to our recently published OpenBSD blog post.

  • Microsoft begins Windows 10's 1809-to-1909 compulsory upgrade

    Microsoft has begun forcibly upgrading Windows 10 PCs running version 1809 with the latest, the November 2019 Update, aka 1909, which the company launched less than a month ago.

  • Xs:code launches subscription platform to monetize open-source projects [Ed: This is basically about making proprietary software add-ons, betraying Free software premises]

    Open source is a great source of free tools for developers, but as these projects proliferate, and some gain in popularity, the creators sometimes look for ways to monetize successful ones. The problem is that it’s hard to run a subscription-based, dual-license approach, and most developers don’t even know where to start. Enter Israeli startup xs:code, which has created a platform to help developers solve this problem. “Xs:code is a monetization platform for open-source projects. Unlike donation platforms which are pretty popular today, xs:code allows open-source developers to provide added value in exchange for payments. That comes on top of what they offer for free. This added value can be a different license, more features, support services or anything they can think of,” Netanel Mohoni, co-founder and CEO of xs:code told TechCrunch. This does not mean the open-source part of this goes away, only that the company is providing a platform for those developers who want to monetize their work, Mohoni said. “Companies pay for accessing the code, and they enjoy better software created by motivated developers who are now compensated for their work. Because our solution makes sure that the code remains open source, developers can continue accepting contributions so the community enjoys better code than ever before,” he explained.

  • The Linux Foundation's Automated Compliance Work Garners New Funding, Advances Tools Development [Ed: Of course the Linux Foundation is still promoting Microsoft GitHub (proprietary) and outsourcing everything to it]
  • The Linux Foundation’s Automated Compliance Work Garners New Funding, Advances Tools Development [Ed: The Corporate Linux Foundation is again whitewashing and openwashing a major GPL violator, VMware]

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced founding member commitments from Google, Siemens and VMware for the Automated Compliance Tooling (ACT), as well as key advancements for tools that increase ease and adoption of open source software. Using open source code comes with a responsibility to comply with the terms of that code’s license. The goal of ACT is to consolidate investments in these efforts and to increase interoperability and usability of open source compliance tooling. Google, Siemens and VMware are among the companies helping to underwrite and lead this collaborative work.

  • If you ARIA label something, give it a role

    As a rule of thumb, if you label something via aria-label or aria-labelledby, make sure it has a proper widget or landmark role. The longer version is that several elements created extraneous amount of announcements in screen readers in the past that were not really useful. Especially in the ARIA 1.0 days where a lot of things weren’t as clear and people were still gathering experience, this was an issue for elements or roles that mapped to regions, multiple landmarks of the same type on a page, etc. Therefore, best practice has become to label both widgets (which should be labeled anyway), and landmarks with means such as aria-label or aria-labelledby, to make them more useful.

  • Twitter Makes A Bet On Protocols Over Platforms

    It looks like Twitter is making a bet on protocols over platforms for its future.

Latte bug fix release v0.9.5

Latte Dock v0.9.5 has been released containing important fixes and improvements! Read more