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Ubuntu MATE 18.10 Released for GPD Pocket PCs, Raspberry Pi Images Coming Soon

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Shipping with the latest MATE 1.20.3 desktop environment and Linux 4.18 kernel, Ubuntu MATE 18.10 is now available with updated apps and core components, better hardware support, and, for the first time, images for the GDP Pocket and GDP Pocket 2 handheld computers, along with the generic images for 64-bit Intel PCs.

According to Martin Wimpress, Ubuntu MATE 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) includes some hardware-specific tweaks and other improvements to core components in an attempt to make the Linux-based operating system work out-of-the-box and without any hiccups on both the GDP Pocket and GDP Pocket 2 tiny computers.

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Plasma 5.14.2

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KDE

Today KDE releases a Bugfix update to KDE Plasma 5, versioned 5.14.2. Plasma 5.14 was released in October with many feature refinements and new modules to complete the desktop experience.

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Also: KDE Plasma 5.14.2 Desktop Environment Improves Firmware Updates, Snap Support

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat: Creativity is risky (and other truths open leaders need to hear)

    Leaders are all too aware of the importance of invention and innovation. Today, the health and wealth of their businesses have become increasingly dependent on the creation of new products and processes. In the digital age especially, competition is more fierce than ever as global markets open and expand. Just keeping pace with change requires a focus on constant improvement and consistent learning. And that says nothing about building for tomorrow.

  • APAC Financial Services Institutions Bank on Red Hat to Enhance Agility
  • APAC banks aim to use open source to enhance agility
  • Huawei CloudFabric Supports Container Network Deployment Automation, Improving Enterprise Service Agility

    At HUAWEI CONNECT 2018, Huawei announced that its CloudFabric Cloud Data Center Solution supports container network deployment automation and will be available for the industry-leading enterprise Kubernetes platform via a new plug-in.

  • Redis Labs Integrates With Red Hat OpenShift, Hits 1B Milestone

    Redis Labs is integrating its enterprise platform as a hosted and managed database service on Red Hat’s OpenShift Container Platform. That integration includes built-in support for Red Hat’s recently launched Kubernetes Operator.

    The Redis Enterprise integration will allow customers to deploy and manage Redis databases as a stateful Kubernetes service. It will also allow users to run Redis Enterprise on premises or across any cloud environment.

  • Needham & Company Starts Red Hat (RHT) at Buy
  • Fedora Toolbox — Hacking on Fedora Silverblue

    Fedora Silverblue is a modern and graphical operating system targetted at laptops, tablets and desktop computers. It is the next-generation Fedora Workstation that promises painless upgrades, clear separation between the OS and applications, and secure and cross-platform applications. The basic operating system is an immutable OSTree image, and all the applications are Flatpaks.

    It’s great!

    However, if you are a hacker and decide to set up a development environment, you immediately run into the immutable OS image and the absence of dnf. You can’t install your favourite tools, editors and SDKs the way you’d normally do on Fedora Workstation. You can either unlock your immutable OS image to install RPMs through rpm-ostree and give up the benefit of painless upgrades; or create a Docker container to get an RPM-based toolbox but be prepared to mess around with root permissions and having to figure out why your SSH agent or display server isn’t working.

  • Fedora 28 : Alien, Steam and Fedora distro.

Raspberry Pi: Hands-on with the updated Raspbian Linux

Filed under
Linux

wrote last week about the new Raspbian Linux release, but in that post I was mostly concerned with the disappearance of the Wolfram (and Mathematica) packages, and I didn't really do justice to the release itself. So now I have continued with installing or upgrading it on all of my Raspberry Pi systems, and this post will concentrate on the process and results from that.

First, the new ISO images are available from the Raspberry Pi Downloads page (as always), and the Release Notes have been added to the usual text document. I have only downloaded the plain Raspbian images, I don't bother with the NOOBS images much any more - but the new ISO is included in those as well of course.

Please note that the SHA-256 checksum for the images is given on the web page, so be sure to verify that before you continue with the file that you downloaded. If you prefer stronger (or weaker) verification, you can find a PGP signature (and an SHA-1 checksum) on the Raspbian images download page.

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Ubuntu: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Release, Official Ubuntu 18.10 T-Shirt and Pop!_OS 18.10 Release

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 550
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 550

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 550 for the week of October 14 – 20, 2018.

  • Ubuntu 18.10 is a Cosmic Cuttlefish of new Linux loveliness

    CANONICAL HAS announced the release of its bi-annual update to the Ubuntu operating system.

    Ubuntu 18.10, aka Cosmic Cuttlefish, is out now. It's not a long-term version so this is more aimed at individual users, as companies prefer to wait for an LTS to commit.

    So what's new in this build? Well, one of the biggest bugbears - graphics driver updating - has been addressed, so there'll be no more of all that sideloading the updates nonsense.

    Canonical has confirmed that this simpler process will get a graphical clicky interface, but not until (probably) version 19.x.

    But in the meantime, the way Ubuntu uses RAM for graphics has been given a kicking and should be a lot more efficient for migrating gamers.

  • Ubuntu 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish is now ready to download

    It’s October which means that we were due an Ubuntu release and Canonical hasn’t failed us this time around. Starting now, users who want to download Ubuntu 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish can do so. The latest version of the popular Linux distribution is only supported for nine months, until July 2019, with it being an inter-LTS release, therefore, you may want to consider sticking with Ubuntu 18.04 LTS on your mission-critical systems.

    Ubuntu 18.10 is no small release; out-of-the-box users will be greeted with a new theme dubbed Yaru and a new icon theme called Suru. It marks the first time that the distribution has received a significant overhaul since Ubuntu 10.10 when Canonical, the firm that makes Ubuntu, decided to throw out the brown colour scheme in favour of the purple, orange, and black theme we’re all now so used to.

  • You Can Now Buy an Official Ubuntu 18.10 T-Shirt

    The reverse of each 100% cotton tee bears the Ubuntu brand mark and text that reads “Cosmic Cuttlefish 18.10”.

    The shirt is both unisex and available in sizes small through quad XL. This should ensure there’s a comfy fit for virtually everyone (though, alas, not me – I’m an XS, and “small” is just too dang big).

    As well as making a great xmas gift idea an Ubuntu-loving loved one, the shirt is also a novel way to communicate your computing preferences to the wider world as you go about your shopping in Walmart, or as a certified conversation starter at tech conferences.

  • System76 releases Ubuntu-based Pop!_OS 18.10 Linux distribution

    System76 is making huge moves lately. The company used to just sell re-branded computers running Ubuntu, and while there was nothing wrong with that, it has much more lofty goals. You see, it released its own Ubuntu-based operating system called "Pop!_OS," and now, it is preparing to release its own self-designed and built open source computers. In other words, much like Apple, System76 is maintaining both the software and hardware aspects of the customer experience.

    While its new hardware is not yet available, the latest version of its operating system is. Following the release of Ubuntu 18.10, Pop!_OS 18.10 is now available for download. While it is based on Ubuntu, it is not merely Canonical's operating system with System76 branding and artwork. Actually, there are some significant customizations that make Pop!_OS its own.

Programming: Bugs, Mistakes, and Python

Filed under
Development
  • Living on the command line: Why mistakes are a good thing
  • Getting started with functional programming in Python using the toolz library

    In the second of a two-part series, we continue to explore how we can import ideas from functional programming methodology into Python to have the best of both worlds.

    In the previous post, we covered immutable data structures. Those allow us to write "pure" functions, or functions that have no side effects, merely accepting some arguments and returning a result while maintaining decent performance.

  • The code's crashed again, but why? Tell us your war stories of bugs found – and bugs fixed

    Even the best software goes wrong from time to time. So, what exactly happens when it throws a wobbly, especially when it's a key component in a production environment?

    Whether it's a total crash, a transaction failure, or the mangling of important data, there's going to be some kind of business impact. And the more the problem persists, the greater the level of pain, loss, and disruption.

    Everyone wants faults identified, diagnosed, and fixed ASAP. Identification is not normally a challenge – user complaints, curses, screams, and threats usually provide a pretty good clue. But before anyone can prioritize and schedule a fix, someone needs to diagnose the problem.

Lakka – Transform Your Old PC into a Retrogaming Console

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

Lakka is a free, lightweight, and open-source Linux distro that turns a small PC into a full-blown game console. It features a beautiful and user-friendly UI with eye candy colours and a PS4-like User Experience.

You can install it on your SD card and easily set it up or run it LIVE. Its wide range of joypad support allows you to use PlayStation, XBox, and Nintendo game controllers.

If you don’t have a PC to use Lakka on you can dedicated hardware at a cost as low as $30 thanks to its support for a variety of computers not excluding Raspberry Pi, Raspberry 2, HummingBoard, Banana Po, Odroid, CuBox-i, Cubietruck, and Cubieboard 2.

Lakka is the official OS of RetroArch which takes care of its inputs and display, and it implements all game systems as a libretro core. This separation ensures that users are able to configure their setup once and have their changes effected across all game systems.

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VirtualBox 6.0 Beta 1

Filed under
OSS
  • Announcement: VirtualBox 6.0 Beta 1 released

    Please do NOT use this VirtualBox Beta release on production machines! A VirtualBox Beta release should be considered a bleeding-edge release meant for early evaluation and testing purposes.

  • Oracle Pushes VirtualBox 6.0 Into Public Beta

    Oracle's Munich developers responsible for maintaining the VirtualBox virtualization software this morning announced the first public test release of the upcoming VirtualBox 6.0.

    While VirtualBox 6.0 is referred to as "a new major release", as of the beta one stage there are just a few features to note. With VirtualBox 6.0 Beta 1 there is support for exporting a virtual machine to the Oracle Cloud Infrastructure. The second listed feature at this stage for v6.0 are improvements to the graphical user-interface for this VM software.

Games: MMORPGs, Disappointment From One Hour One Life and Linux port of Total War: WARHAMMER II

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Gaming

Kernel: Security in Linux 4.19 and 4.20 Work So Far

Filed under
Linux
  • Kees Cook: security things in Linux v4.19

    While it seems like ages ago, the fixes for L1TF actually landed at the start of the v4.19 merge window. As with the other speculation flaw fixes, lots of people were involved, and the scope was pretty wide: bare metal machines, virtualized machines, etc. LWN has a great write-up on the L1TF flaw and the kernel’s documentation on L1TF defenses is equally detailed. I like how clean the solution is for bare-metal machines: when a page table entry should be marked invalid, instead of only changing the “Present” flag, it also inverts the address portion so even a speculative lookup ignoring the “Present” flag will land in an unmapped area.

  • Linux Kernel Interface To Finally Allow For Programmable LED Patterns

    It's not often we get to talk about the LED drivers for the Linux kernel... Yes, the class of Linux kernel drivers to support controlling the brightness of LEDs via supported drivers and exposing that to user-space. With Linux 4.20~5.0 comes finally the ability to program "patterns" for LEDs.

  • Linux 4.20~5.0 Bringing Better x86 32-Bit Hibernation Support

    Intel's Rafael Wysocki sent in the power management updates today for the Linux 4.20~5.0 kernel cycle.

    On the power management front for this next Linux kernel, there is better x86 32-bit hibernation support. Hibernation bug fixes were back-ported from the x86_64 kernel code to x86 32-bit for consolidating the x86 hibernation handling and allowing a lot more 32-bit systems to behave correctly should you still be running them and wish to correctly hibernate for power conservation.

  • IBM s390 Code For Linux 4.20 Bringing Several Features

    Should you be into Linux on z Systems, the IBM s390 code for the Linux 4.20~5.0 cycle is coming with several feature additions.

    The s390 code is bringing a few features that have been available on other platforms for a while including KASAN (Kernel Address Sanitizer) as well as support for virtually mapped kernel stacks.

Linux Foundation: Academy Software Foundation Grows, Zemlin Interviewed

Filed under
Linux
  • Open Source: Sony Pictures, Warner Bros. Join Academy Software Foundation (EXCLUSIVE)
  • How the Linux Foundation is reckoning with its security and diversity issues

    Linus Torvalds is back in charge of Linux. With that elephant out of the room - what else might the Linux Foundation be keen to address?

    Speaking with Computerworld UK at the Open Source Summit in Edinburgh this week, executive director of the Foundation, Jim Zemlin, outlined three key areas of improvement: application security, diversity, and data sharing.

    [...]

    These are the most pressing issues outlined by Zemlin, but another area where the Foundation hopes to see improvement is bolstering collaboration, specifically around the rise of machine learning, artificial intelligence and predictive analytics.

    As these become more important to how people build technology products and services, Zemlin adds, the importance of code sharing also increases.

    "I think the concept of taking open source practices of code sharing and lending them to data sharing is something that we could assist on, and to that end we've created an open data licence - two of them actually, a copyleft one and a more permissive data licence, similar to how standardised open source licences made it easy to share code, make it easy to share data."

Windows Back Doors for NSA, Libssh (Not Related to OpenSSH) Patched

Filed under
Security
  • Windows servers still infected by DarkPulsar NSA exploit

    Researchers from security outfit Kaspersky Lab say they have found about 50 systems infected by the DarkPulsar malware, part of the NSA exploits which were dumped online by a group calling itself the Shadow Brokers in 2017.
    A research brief written by Andrey Dolgushev, Dmitry Tarakanov and Vasily Berdnikov said DarkPulsar was in the implants category of the dump which included two frameworks called DanderSpritz and FuzzBunch. DarkPulsar was not a backdoor in itself, but just the administrative part of a backdoor.

  • Kaspersky says it detected infections with DarkPulsar, alleged NSA malware

    The hacking tools were leaked by a group of hackers known as the Shadow Brokers, who claimed they stole them from the Equation Group, a codename given by the cyber-security industry to a group that's universally believed to be the NSA.

    DarkPulsar went mostly unnoticed for more than 18 months as the 2017 dump also included EternalBlue, the exploit that powered last year's three ransomware outbreaks --WannaCry, NotPetya, and Bad Rabbit.

    Almost all the infosec community's eyes have been focused on EternalBlue for the past year, and for a good reason, as the exploit has now become commodity malware.

    But in recent months, Kaspersky researchers have also started to dig deeper into the other hacking tools leaked by the Shadow Brokers last year.

    They looked at FuzzBunch, which is an exploit framework that the Equation Group has been using to deploy exploits and malware on victims' systems using a CLI interface similar to the Metasploit pen-testing framework.

  • Libssh CVE-2018-10933 Scanners & Exploits Released - Apply Updates Now

Openwashing 'OpenSync' and Oracle

Filed under
OSS
  • Open source initiative to improve residential Wi-Fi [Ed: No, OpenSync is about broadening the reach of in-home surveillance]

    Operators Liberty Global, Bell and Comcast have signed up to OpenSync that was announced at the Broadband World Forum. It creates a silicon, CPE, and cloud-agnostic approach for the curation, delivery and management of emerging residential services leveraging managed Wi-Fi.

  • Plume and Samsung Launch OpenSync™ Open Source Initiative

    Following the large-scale deployment of residential Wi-Fi services relying on its core elements, the cloud managed modern home services pioneer Plume, and the world’s largest consumer electronics manufacturer Samsung announced the formation of a new open source software initiative called OpenSync™. The initiative, whose elements have been deployed by Liberty Global, the world’s largest international TV & broadband company, Bell, Canada’s largest communications company, and Comcast, the largest broadband company in the US, creates a silicon, CPE, and cloud-agnostic approach for the curation, delivery and management of emerging residential services leveraging managed Wi-Fi.

  • Oracle helps users curate their way through the growing open-source cloud stack [Ed: "SPONSORED POST BY PETER BURRIS" and "This post is sponsored by Oracle Corp." So Mr. Burris is basically a PR agent, paid by Oracle for openwashing and googlebombing.]

Software: Simplenote, GNU Parallel, Eye Care

Filed under
Software
  • Simplenote Adds a Distraction-Free Focus Mode

    A distraction-free focus mode has been added to the nifty note taking app Simplenote.

    The feature is one of several improvements the desktop client picks up in its latest update, and is freely available for Windows, macOS, and Linux users. Mobile apps for iOS and Android are also available.

    Famed for its markdown support in particular, Simplenote is a frill-free note taking app dedicated to the taking and organising of text notes.

  • GNU Parallel 20181022 ('Khashoggi') released

    GNU Parallel 20181022 ('Khashoggi') has been released.

  • Eye Care: Best Free Linux Software to Look after your Eyes

    Many people who regularly use computers suffer from eye strain and fatigue. Looking at a monitor for a long time can strain your eyes or can make any other problems you are having with your eyes seem more apparent. There is also research to show that late-night exposure to bright lights can affect sleep quality. This can be mitigated by reducing blue-light exposure.

    There are lots of simple steps you can take to reduce eye strain and fatigue. These include adjusting the brightness, contrast settings, and text size displayed, as well as minimizing glare, and ensuring your room has proper lighting. Taking regular breaks is also very important.

    Some monitors go further offering various eye care technologies including flicker-free technology, and an ultra-low blue light filter with different filter settings. But even if your display offers eye care technology and it’s well designed e.g. offering hotkeys that let you easily adjust filter settings. there’s still a good case to use a software solution as well. This is because the software typically offers more flexibility, such as the ability to automatically adjust the backlight and screen temperature based on the ambient brightness in your surroundings, or on a time schedule.

Mozilla: Firefox 63, TenFourFox FPR10, Servo Progress

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Firefox 63 Released with Tab Switcher Changes, More Robust Web Extensions

    Firefox 63 is the first version of the web browser to run web extensions (previously known as add-ons) in their own processes on Linux systems. Firefox already runs “out-of-process extensions” in its Windows and Mac builds.

    Although largely a technical change it should lead to some tangible performance benefits, and help improve the overall security and stability of Firefox. Should an add-on crash or have a memory leak it can no longer take the rest of the browser (or its tabs) with it.

  • Cameron Kaiser: TenFourFox FPR10 available

    TenFourFox Feature Parity Release 10 final is now available (downloads, hashes, release notes). This version is live now. Other than outstanding security updates, in this version I also retracted the change (by flipping the pref) for unique data URL origins in issue 525 because of some reported add-on incompatibility. I'm looking at a way add-ons can get around this with their existing code for FPR11, but you're warned: many sites rely on this behaviour to reduce their cross-site scriping surface, and we will have to turn it back on sooner or later.

    The changes for FPR11 (December) and FPR12 will be smaller in scope mostly because of the holidays and my parallel work on the POWER9 JIT for Firefox on the Talos II. For the next couple FPRs I'm planning to do more ES6 work (mostly Symbol and whatever else I can shoehorn in) and to enable unique data URI origins, and possibly get requestIdleCallback into a releaseable state. Despite the slower pace, however, we will still be tracking the Firefox release schedule as usual.

  • RGSoC wrap-up - Supporting Responsive Images in Servo

    Hey everyone, this is Nupur Baghel and Paavini Nanda, from the team “101 Days of Summer”. Both of us are computer engineering undergraduate students from New Delhi, India. We were involved with Servo this summer under the Rails Girls Summer of Code program and spent an amazing 3 months implementing functionalities to support responsive images in Servo <3

  • This Week In Servo 116

    In the past weeks, we merged 61 PRs in the Servo organization’s repositories.

RISC OS Liberated

Filed under
OS
OSS
  • Acorn Computer's RISC OS operating system finally goes fully open source

    RISC OS, the operating system that powered Acorn Computer's Archimedes computers in the 1980s and 1990s, has been fully released to open source.

    The move was welcomed by Raspberry Pi CEO Eben Upton: "RISC OS is a great demonstration of how much performance a well-tuned operating system and user interface can wring out of a platform. Moving to a free open source licence should bring a renewed interest to RISC OS."

    The shift to open source will enable the operating system to be used in new environments and markets, according to RISC OS Developments director Andrew Rawnsley. "This move unlocks a lot of opportunities for RISC OS that were previously inaccessible due to former licence restrictions. We look forward to seeing the exciting projects that this makes possible," said Rawnsley.

  • Roughly 30 years after its birth at UK's Acorn Computers, RISC OS 5 is going open source

    RISC OS was designed and developed by Acorn Computers, once dubbed the Apple of Britain, in the 1980s to run on the fledgling 32-bit Arm processor family, also designed by Acorn. Yes, the Arm that now powers the world's smartphones, embedded electronics, Internet-of-Things, and more, although it's come a long way since its mid-1980s genesis.

    The operating system, meanwhile, began life as the rough-around-the-edges Arthur 1.20 in 1987 for the ARM2-powered Archimedes A305 and A310, and by 1989, had morphed into the more slick RISC OS 2, written mostly in handcrafted assembly language for performance and memory-footprint reasons.

Qt 5.9.7 Released

Filed under
KDE

Qt 5.9.7 is released today. As a patch release Qt 5.9.7 does not add any new functionality, but provides important bug fixes and other improvements.

Compared to Qt 5.9.6, the new Qt 5.9.7 contains almost 60 bug fixes. In total there are around 180 changes in Qt 5.9.7 compared to Qt 5.9.6. For details of the most important changes, please check the Change files of Qt 5.9.7.

Qt 5.9.7 can be updated to using the maintenance tool of the online installer. For new installations, please download latest online installer from Qt Account portal or from qt.io Download page. Offline packages are available for commercial users in the Qt Account portal and at the qt.io Download page for open-source users.

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Great News! Linus Torvalds is Back in Charge of Linux

Filed under
News

Linus Torvalds is back in charge of Linux Kernel development. It remains to be seen whether he has improved his behavior and become a gentler person or not.
Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Raspberry Pi: Hands-on with the updated Raspbian Linux

wrote last week about the new Raspbian Linux release, but in that post I was mostly concerned with the disappearance of the Wolfram (and Mathematica) packages, and I didn't really do justice to the release itself. So now I have continued with installing or upgrading it on all of my Raspberry Pi systems, and this post will concentrate on the process and results from that. First, the new ISO images are available from the Raspberry Pi Downloads page (as always), and the Release Notes have been added to the usual text document. I have only downloaded the plain Raspbian images, I don't bother with the NOOBS images much any more - but the new ISO is included in those as well of course. Please note that the SHA-256 checksum for the images is given on the web page, so be sure to verify that before you continue with the file that you downloaded. If you prefer stronger (or weaker) verification, you can find a PGP signature (and an SHA-1 checksum) on the Raspbian images download page. Read more

Ubuntu: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Release, Official Ubuntu 18.10 T-Shirt and Pop!_OS 18.10 Release

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 550
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 550
    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 550 for the week of October 14 – 20, 2018.
  • Ubuntu 18.10 is a Cosmic Cuttlefish of new Linux loveliness
    CANONICAL HAS announced the release of its bi-annual update to the Ubuntu operating system. Ubuntu 18.10, aka Cosmic Cuttlefish, is out now. It's not a long-term version so this is more aimed at individual users, as companies prefer to wait for an LTS to commit. So what's new in this build? Well, one of the biggest bugbears - graphics driver updating - has been addressed, so there'll be no more of all that sideloading the updates nonsense. Canonical has confirmed that this simpler process will get a graphical clicky interface, but not until (probably) version 19.x. But in the meantime, the way Ubuntu uses RAM for graphics has been given a kicking and should be a lot more efficient for migrating gamers.
  • Ubuntu 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish is now ready to download
    It’s October which means that we were due an Ubuntu release and Canonical hasn’t failed us this time around. Starting now, users who want to download Ubuntu 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish can do so. The latest version of the popular Linux distribution is only supported for nine months, until July 2019, with it being an inter-LTS release, therefore, you may want to consider sticking with Ubuntu 18.04 LTS on your mission-critical systems. Ubuntu 18.10 is no small release; out-of-the-box users will be greeted with a new theme dubbed Yaru and a new icon theme called Suru. It marks the first time that the distribution has received a significant overhaul since Ubuntu 10.10 when Canonical, the firm that makes Ubuntu, decided to throw out the brown colour scheme in favour of the purple, orange, and black theme we’re all now so used to.
  • You Can Now Buy an Official Ubuntu 18.10 T-Shirt
    The reverse of each 100% cotton tee bears the Ubuntu brand mark and text that reads “Cosmic Cuttlefish 18.10”. The shirt is both unisex and available in sizes small through quad XL. This should ensure there’s a comfy fit for virtually everyone (though, alas, not me – I’m an XS, and “small” is just too dang big). As well as making a great xmas gift idea an Ubuntu-loving loved one, the shirt is also a novel way to communicate your computing preferences to the wider world as you go about your shopping in Walmart, or as a certified conversation starter at tech conferences.
  • System76 releases Ubuntu-based Pop!_OS 18.10 Linux distribution
    System76 is making huge moves lately. The company used to just sell re-branded computers running Ubuntu, and while there was nothing wrong with that, it has much more lofty goals. You see, it released its own Ubuntu-based operating system called "Pop!_OS," and now, it is preparing to release its own self-designed and built open source computers. In other words, much like Apple, System76 is maintaining both the software and hardware aspects of the customer experience. While its new hardware is not yet available, the latest version of its operating system is. Following the release of Ubuntu 18.10, Pop!_OS 18.10 is now available for download. While it is based on Ubuntu, it is not merely Canonical's operating system with System76 branding and artwork. Actually, there are some significant customizations that make Pop!_OS its own.

Programming: Bugs, Mistakes, and Python

  • Living on the command line: Why mistakes are a good thing
  • Getting started with functional programming in Python using the toolz library
    In the second of a two-part series, we continue to explore how we can import ideas from functional programming methodology into Python to have the best of both worlds. In the previous post, we covered immutable data structures. Those allow us to write "pure" functions, or functions that have no side effects, merely accepting some arguments and returning a result while maintaining decent performance.
  • The code's crashed again, but why? Tell us your war stories of bugs found – and bugs fixed
    Even the best software goes wrong from time to time. So, what exactly happens when it throws a wobbly, especially when it's a key component in a production environment? Whether it's a total crash, a transaction failure, or the mangling of important data, there's going to be some kind of business impact. And the more the problem persists, the greater the level of pain, loss, and disruption. Everyone wants faults identified, diagnosed, and fixed ASAP. Identification is not normally a challenge – user complaints, curses, screams, and threats usually provide a pretty good clue. But before anyone can prioritize and schedule a fix, someone needs to diagnose the problem.

Lakka – Transform Your Old PC into a Retrogaming Console

Lakka is a free, lightweight, and open-source Linux distro that turns a small PC into a full-blown game console. It features a beautiful and user-friendly UI with eye candy colours and a PS4-like User Experience. You can install it on your SD card and easily set it up or run it LIVE. Its wide range of joypad support allows you to use PlayStation, XBox, and Nintendo game controllers. If you don’t have a PC to use Lakka on you can dedicated hardware at a cost as low as $30 thanks to its support for a variety of computers not excluding Raspberry Pi, Raspberry 2, HummingBoard, Banana Po, Odroid, CuBox-i, Cubietruck, and Cubieboard 2. Lakka is the official OS of RetroArch which takes care of its inputs and display, and it implements all game systems as a libretro core. This separation ensures that users are able to configure their setup once and have their changes effected across all game systems. Read more