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Tuesday, 16 Oct 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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today's howtos

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HowTos

Linux Devices: ARM and La Frite

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Linux
Hardware
  • Arm brings Intel, Arduino, myDevices into the Pelion IoT platform ecosystem

    Arm on Monday is announcing a series of new partnerships that will enhance Pelion, its Internet of Things platform, making it easier for customers to deploy and manage a wider range of IoT devices on the platform.

    First, the Peltion Platform can now be used to manage Intel Architecture (x86) platforms, in addition to Arm-based IoT devices and gateways. Next, Arm is partnering with myDevices to make it easier to quickly onboard a wider array of devices. Additionally, Arduino is partnering with Pelion Connectivity Management to enable developers to quickly create and scale cellular IoT designs.

  • ARM expands Pelion IoT platform to Intel, Linux ecosystems

    In addition, the company announced Mbed Linux OS, which builds on its Mbed OS for IoT devices based on Cortex-A. Mbed Linux OS is integrated with the Pelion IoT Platform and is designed to open up new classes of IoT devices with complex applications, such as those processing video or edge gateways. Developers can sign-up now for early access to the new software.

  • Raspberry Pi A+-sized $10 La Frite Linux board has better specs at half the price

    The La Frite board is a follow up to Libre Computing's $25 Le Potato board and is "loosely based" on the design of the Raspberry Pi A+ -- a smaller and cheaper Pi than the $35 Raspberry Pi B+ -- due to the 40-pin GPIO header setup.

    It's currently available to backers on the device's Kickstarter page and will be generally available in November.

Qt/KDE: Qt 5.12 Beta 2, Krita at the University of La Plata, LaKademy 2018

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KDE
  • Qt 5.12 beta2 released

    We have published Qt 5.12 beta2 today. As earlier you can get it via online installer. Delta to beta1 attached.

  • Qt 5.12 Beta 2 Brings Many Fixes

    Just two weeks after the Qt 5.12 beta release, a second beta is now available for testing of this forthcoming tool-kit update.

    The Qt 5.12 Beta 2 update is made up of bug fixes with changes ranging from build fixes for different platforms to disabling mouse tracking by default within the QtWebGLPlugin to fixed Ozone platform detection. There are more than 200 changes to Qt 5.12 that have been queued over the past two weeks.

    The complete list of the 200+ changes that are mostly fixes in Qt 5.12 Beta 2 can be found via today's release announcement with the attached change-log.

  • Krita at the University of La Plata

    Sebastian Labi ha sido invitado para presentar Krita en el Laboratorio de herramientas de software libre de la Universidad de La Plata. Hablará sobre ilustración digital y usará Krita para dar una demostración de cómo usar Krita para el campo de la Ilustración Digital.

    El SLAD- FBA (Software libre para Arte y diseño) es una nueva unidad de de investigación y formación en la Facultad de Bellas Artes que promueve el conocimiento y uso del software libre en la capacitación académica de la Universidad de La Plata.

  • LaKademy 2018 – Third and Fourth Days (October 13th and 14th)

    The third day of LaKademy 2018 was my last day participating on the event.

    During October 13th, we started the day with a promo reunion. This reunion was done to discuss about some plans and actions for the Latin American KDE community over the next year. Some decisions were made and topics were discussed involving KDE participation in some events, promotion of our own events in Latin America, including LaKademy 2019 and Kafé com Qt, and some details in general about our community.

BSD: DragonFlyBSD News and Fosdem 2019 BSD devroom CfP

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BSD
  • DragonFlyBSD Lands Another NUMA Optimization Helping AMD Threadripper 2 CPUs

    DragonFlyBSD lead developer Matthew Dillon has been quite impressed with AMD's Threadripper 2 processors particularly the Threadripper 2990WX with 32-cores / 64-threads. Dillon has made various optimizations to DragonFly for helping out this processor in past months and overnight he made another significant improvement.

  • Fosdem 2019: BSD devroom CfP

    The Fosdem is a free event for software hackers to meet, share ideas and collaborate. Every year 8000+ open source developers from all the world gather at the event in Brussels, Belgium. During the Fosdem, developer rooms (devrooms) are assigned to self organized open source groups and projects to meet together and showcase their projects.

Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat

Events: Hacktoberfest 2018, Announcing Linux Autumn 2018

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OSS
  • Hacktoberfest 2018 - Celebrate Open Source!

    Hacktoberfest is an annual event sponsored by DigitalOcean in partnership with GitHub and Twilio and while "Hacktoberfest" might sound or give the impression of something doable only by very experienced hacker programmers, in essence, it's just a wrapper around having to submit 5 Pull Requests to any Github hosted repository and earn some swag in return.

  • Mangaluru: Sahyadri Open Source Community holds Hacktoberfest HackNight

    Sahyadri Open Source Community (SOSC) at Sahyadri hosted Hacktoberfest HackNight in association with K-Tech Innovation Hub on October 13 and 14 at Sahyadri to celebrate the month of open source with Hacktoberfest.

    The event was inaugurated by Shashank Krishna, Padma Shri 2019 (nominee) and director of Katmai Infotechnology Pvt Ltd, Bengaluru, followed by interaction with students regarding Smart India Hackathon. Dr R Srinivasa Rao Kunte, principal of Sahyadri College of Engineering and management, Prakhyath Rai, faculty coordinator, asst professor of Information Science, and Arjun Suvarna, chairperson of Sahyadri Open Source Community, addressed the crowd.

  • Announcing Linux Autumn 2018

    Linux Autumn is an annual meeting of Free Software and Linux enthusiast from Poland organized since 2003 which means this year it will be its 16th time. This year it will be organized in Ustroń in the southern Poland from 9 to 11 November. The town is the same as the last year but in a different hotel.

    As the place is located near the Czech and Slovak border we would like to invite more people, both speakers and attendees, from other countries. We are aware of strong presence of Fedora contributors in Brno and other nearby cities just across the border.

Openwashing: Asay, Saran and More

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Microsoft
OSS

Mozilla: FirefoxOS, Quality Speakings and Mozilla's Take on Encryption in Australia

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Moz/FF
  • FirefoxOS, A keyboard and prediction: Story of my first contribution

    This was at IBM, New York where I was interning and working on the TJ Watson project. I returned back to my desk, turned on my dual monitors, started reading some blogs and engaging on Mozilla IRC (a new found and pretty short lived hobby). Just a few days before that, FirefoxOS was launched in India in the form of an Intex phone with a $35 price tag. It was making waves all around, because of its hefty price and poor performance . The OS struggle was showing up in the super low cost hardware. I was personally furious about some of the shortcomings, primarily the keyboard which at that time didn’t support prediction in any language other than English and also did not learn new words. Coincidentally, I came upon Dietrich Ayala in the FirefoxOS IRC channel, who at that time was a Platform Engineer at Mozilla. To my surprise he agreed with many of my complaints and asked me if I want to contribute my ideas. I very much wanted to, but then again, I had no idea how. The idea of contributing to the codebase of something like FirefoxOS terrified me. He suggested I first send a proposal and then proceed from there. With my busy work schedule at IBM, this discussion slipped my mind and did not fully boil in my head until I returned home from my internship.

  • Quality Speakings

    Unfortunately my suite of annoying verbal tics – um right um right um, which I continue to treat like Victor Borge’s phonetic punctuation – are on full display here, but I guess we’ll have to live with that. Here’s a talk I gave at the GTA Linux User Group on “The State Of Mozilla”, split into the main talk and the Q&A sections. I could probably have cut a quarter of that talk out by just managing those twitches better, but I guess that’s a project for 2019.

  • Encryption bill will cause 'significant risk' to Internet: Mozilla

    Any measure that permits a government to lay down specifications for the design of Internet systems would cause significant risk to the security, stability and trust of such systems, the Mozilla Foundation has said in a submission about Australia's proposed encryption bill.

Games: AI War 2, Total War: WARHAMMER II and More

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Gaming
  • Grand strategy game AI War 2 is now available in Early Access

    AI War 2 from Arcen Games has finally entered Early Access today after being funded on Kickstarter back at the end of 2016. Thankfully, they've lived up to their promise of Linux support as it's available right away.

  • Play It Now - PixelJunk Shooter

    Welcome to the another review in the PIN (Play It NOW) series, where we highlight under-rated games that didn’t get the praise and attention they deserved on release and still don’t to this day. Until now! This time, we’ll take a look at PixelJunk Shooter by Q-Games Ltd.

  • The deep monster taming RPG 'Siralim 3' has now officially launched with Linux support

    For those after their next RPG fix, the monster taming game Siralim 3 [Official Site] is now officially out with Linux support as it has left Early Access.

    While not the most graphically pleasing, the Siralim series do always have a really good amount of depth in them allowing you a ridiculous amount of fun.

  • Feral show off Total War: WARHAMMER II on Linux, along with confirming more Linux ports and a Vulkan teaser

    Feral Interactive just put up a YouTube video to show off Total War: WARHAMMER II running on Linux, it's looking good and they confirmed again their future Linux plans.

    What's interesting, is that in this video they did confirm a few interesting bits of extra information. Firstly, they confirmed that Total War: WARHAMMER II is using Vulkan (which we knew already) but the more interesting thing is what they said after. They said "By the way, we do have more sweet sweet Vulkan plans up our sleeves, but they're secret.". It's going to be interesting to find out what they mean by that, since they wouldn't say such a thing if it just meant future ports will use Vulkan, since we already know that as they've said it multiple times before.

  • Eternum EX, a retro-inspired action platformer comes to Linux this month

    Inspired by ’80s arcade cabinet games, Eternum EX aims to be a challenging retro action platformer that's releasing this month.

    The developer said they were inspired by games like Bomb Jack (Tehkan, 1984), Ghosts’n Goblins (Capcom, 1985), Baluba-louk no Densetsu (Able, 1986) and Psychic 5 (Jaleco, 1987).

  • Smith and Winston, a metroidvania-styled twin-stick shooter in a voxel world has Linux support

    For those who love a good twin-stick shooter, Smith and Winston certainly looks quite interesting and it has some pretty sweet design.

  • Today, Linux game porter Ethan Lee begins officially working on Steam Play's Proton

    A small update for those interested in keeping up with the news surrounding Steam Play and Proton development.

    In September, we spoke to Linux game porter Ethan Lee where he went on to mention how he would like to officially work on Steam Play's Proton. Not long after our article went up, he ended up speaking to Valve so things started moving pretty quickly. All was quiet, then, at the start of this month he wrote a post on Google+ to mention that he was working out some sort of contract to officially begin working on it.

Ubuntu: Eurotech, LogMeIn Snap and Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 549

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Ubuntu
  • Canonical collaborates with Eurotech on edge computing solutions

    Coinciding with IoT World Solutions Congress in Barcelona this week, Canonical is pleased to announce a dual-pronged technological partnership with Eurotech to help organisations advance their internet of things enablement. Eurotech is a long time leader in embedded computing hardware as well as providing software solutions to aid enterprises to deliver their IoT projects either end to end or by providing intervening building blocks.

    As part of the partnership, Canonical has published a Snap for the Eclipse Kura project – the popular, open-source Java-based IoT edge framework. Having Kura available as a Snap – the universal Linux application packaging format – will enable a wider availability of Linux users across multiple distributions to take advantage of the framework and ensure it is supported on more hardware. Snap support will also extend on Eurotech’s commercially supported version; the Everywhere Software Framework (ESF). By installing Kura as a Snap on a device, users will benefit with automatic updates to ensure they are always working from the latest version while with the reassurance of a secure, confined environment.

  • Self-containing dependencies LogMeIn to publish their first Snap
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 549

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 549 for the week of October 7 – 13, 2018.

Fedora: Flock, Flatpaks, Fedora/RISC-V and More

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Red Hat
  • CommOps takeaways from Flock 2018

    The annual Fedora contributor conference, Flock, took place from August 8-11, 2018. Several members of the Community Operations (CommOps) team were present for the conference. We also held a half-day team sprint for team members and interested people to participate and share feedback with the team.

  • Flatpaks, sandboxes and security

    Last week the Flatpak community woke to the “news” that we are making the world a less secure place and we need to rethink what we’re doing. Personally, I’m not sure this is a fair assessment of the situation. The “tl;dr” summary is: Flatpak confers many benefits besides the sandboxing, and even looking just at the sandboxing, improving app security is a huge problem space and so is a work in progress across multiple upstream projects. Much of what has been achieved so far already delivers incremental improvements in security, and we’re making solid progress on the wider app distribution and portability problem space.

    Sandboxing, like security in general, isn’t a binary thing – you can’t just say because you have a sandbox, you have 100% security. Like having two locks on your front door, two front doors, or locks on your windows too, sensible security is about defense in depth. Each barrier that you implement precludes some invalid or possibly malicious behaviour. You hope that in total, all of these barriers would prevent anything bad, but you can never really guarantee this – it’s about multiplying together probabilities to get a smaller number. A computer which is switched off, in a locked faraday cage, with no connectivity, is perfectly secure – but it’s also perfectly useless because you cannot actually use it. Sandboxing is very much the same – whilst you could easily take systemd-nspawn, Docker or any other container technology of choice and 100% lock down a desktop app, you wouldn’t be able to interact with it at all.

  • Fedora/RISC-V now mirrored as a Fedora “alternative” architecture
  • PSA: System update fails when trying to remove rtkit-0.11-19.fc29

GNU Guile and FSF Forum

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GNU
  • GNU Guile 2.9.1 beta released JIT native code generation to speed up all Guile programs

    GNU released Guile 2.9.1 beta of the extension language for the GNU project. It is the first pre-release leading up to the 3.0 release series.

    In comparison to the current stable series, 2.2.x, Guile 2.9.1 brings support for just-in-time native code generation to speed up all Guile programs.

  • [FSF] Introducing our new associate member forum!

    I'm excited to share that we've launched a new forum for our associate members. We hope that you find this forum to be a great place to share your experiences and perspectives surrounding free software and to forge new bonds with the free software community. If you're a member of the FSF, head on over to https://forum.members.fsf.org to get started. You'll be able to log in using the Central Authentication Service (CAS) account that you used to create your membership. (Until we get WebLabels working for the site, you'll have to whitelist its JavaScript in order to log in and use it, but rest assured that all of the JavaScript is free software, and a link to all source code can be found in the footer of the site.) Participation in this forum is just one of many benefits of being an FSF member – if you're not a member yet, we encourage you to join today, for as little as $10 per month, or $5 per month for students.

    The purpose of this member forum is to provide a space where members can meet, communicate, and collaborate with each other about free software, using free software. While there are other places on the Internet to talk about free software, this forum is unique in that it is focused on the common interests of FSF members, who care very much about using, promoting, and creating free software.

    The forum software we chose to use is Discourse.

Librem 5 general development report

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Gadgets
  • Librem 5 general development report — October 15th, 2018

    Hi everyone! Phew, it has been a busy and exciting time these last several weeks. Here is a fairly detailed summary of the progress that has been made on the various pieces of the Librem 5 project.

    [...]

    In phosh, there have been many bugs fixed and the code has been cleaned up. Also an effort has gone towards translations, updating the German and French translations as well as standardizing the po headers to hopefully make it less confusing for new translators.

  • Purism Shares The Latest Librem 5 Smartphone Progress - Dev Kits Going Out Soon

    Purism has shared the latest details on their efforts to deliver the open-source Linux Librem 5 smartphone to market in 2019.

Software: Nativefier and Linux NVENC OBS Screen Capture

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Software
  • Nativefier – Easily Make Any Website into Desktop Application

    Nativefier is a CLI tool that easily create a executable desktop application of any website with succinct and minimal configuration. Anybody can use it and it is a lot lighter than typical Electron apps.

    Nativefier is based on the electron-package and since Electron apps are platform independent, any Nativefiered app will run on GNU/Linux distros as well as on Windows and Mac Operating Systems.

  • Linux NVENC OBS Screen Capture – For The Record

    Linux NVENC OBS Screen Capture. How does it compare to a USB hardware capture device? With select NVIDIA cards and a NVIDIA modern driver for Linux, my OBS installation is able to take advantage of GPU video capturing.

piwheels: Speedy Python package installation for the Raspberry Pi

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Linux

One of the great things about the Python programming language is PyPI, the Python Package Index, where third-party libraries are hosted, available for anyone to install and gain access to pre-existing functionality without starting from scratch. These libraries are handy utilities, written by members of the community, that aren't found within the Python standard library. But they work in much the same way—you import them into your code and have access to functions and classes you didn't write yourself.

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KDE: digiKam Recipes, Krita and Calligra Boost From Handshake Foundation

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KDE
  • digiKam Recipes 18.10.15 Released

    It’s time for another digiKam Recipes update. The most visible change in this update is the new book cover. All screenshots were also updated to reflect changes in the current version of digiKam.

  • [Krita] Interview with Sira Argia

    2014 is the year that I first started to try Linux on my laptop, and then I knew that Windows programs don’t run perfectly on Linux even using “wine”. My curiosity about Linux and the alternative programs led me to Krita. The more time I spent with Linux, the more I fell in love with it. And finally I thought that “I’ll choose Linux as a single OS on my laptop and Krita as a digital painting program for work someday after I get my first graphic tablet.”

  • And so the [Krita] Fundraiser Ends

    Yesterday was the last day of the developers sprint^Wmarathon, and the last day of the fundraiser. We’re all good and knackered here, but the fundraiser ended at a very respectable 26,426 euros! That’s really awesome, thanks everybody!

  • Sizeable donation from Handshake Foundation

    We’re glad to announce that we received donation of 100,000 USD, which is part of 300,000 USD offered to our KDE organization. Quite appropriate for a birthday present, as the KDE project just turned 22 this last weekend! It’s true recognition for KDE as one of the world’s largest open source project.

GNOME: Restyling, Geoclue and Outreachy

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GNOME
  • Restyling apps at scale

    Over the past few months we’ve had a lively debate about “theming” in GNOME, and how it affects our ecosystem. In this discussion I’ve found that there is a divide between people who design and/or develop apps, and people who don’t. I have yet to see an app developer who thinks the current approach to “theming” can work, while many people who aren’t app developers are arguing that it can.

    After a few long discussions I started to realize that part of the reason why there’s so little agreement and so much drama around this issue is that we don’t agree what the problem is. Those who don’t work on apps often can’t see the issues with theming and think we want to remove things for no reason, while those who do are very frustrated that the other side doesn’t want to acknowledge how broken everything is.

  • Geoclue 2.5 & repeating call for help

    Also, while I'm at it, I wanted to highlight the "call for help" at the end of that post by repeating it here again. I apologize of repeating to those who already read it but a friend pointed out that it's likely going to be missed by many folks:
    The future of Mozilla Location Service
    When Mozilla announced their location service in late 2013, Geoclue became one of its first users as it was our only hope for a reliable WiFi-geolocation source. We couldn't use Google's service as their ToC don't allow it to be used in an open source project (I recall some clause that it can only be used with Google Maps and not any other Map software). Mozilla Location Service (MLS) was a huge success in terms of people contributing WiFi data to it. I've been to quite a few places around Europe and North America in the last few years and I haven't been to any location, that is not already covered by MLS.

  • Making a first contribution in Outreachy usability testing

    If you want to join us in GNOME usability testing as part of the upcoming cycle in Outreachy, you'll need to make a first contribution as part of your application process. Every project in Outreachy asks for a first contribution; this is a requirement in Outreachy.

    Don't make too big of a deal about your first contribution in usability testing. We don't expect interns to know much about usability testing as they enter the internship. Throughout the internship, you'll learn about usability testing. So for this first contribution, we set a low bar.

Kali Linux: What You Must Know Before Using it

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

Kali Linux is the industry’s leading Linux distribution in penetration testing and ethical hacking. It is a distribution that comes shipped with tons and tons of hacking and penetration tools and software by default, and is widely recognized in all parts of the world, even among Windows users who may not even know what Linux is.

Because of the latter, many people are trying to get alone with Kali Linux although they don’t even understand the basics of a Linux system. The reasons may vary from having fun, faking being a hacker to impress a girlfriend or simply trying to hack the neighbors’ WiFi network to get a free Internet, all of which is a bad thing to do if you are planning to use Kali Linux.

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