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Friday, 19 Oct 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Security: ZDNet/CBS FUD, WiFi4EU, and Krack Wi-Fi

Filed under
Security
  • Open source web hosting software compromised with DDoS malware [Ed: CBS hired Catalin Cimpanu for him to have a broader platform with which to associate "Open Source" with security issues (does he say "proprietary" when it's proprietary, too?). Microsoft has long financed efforts to associate FOSS/copyleft with security issues and stigmatise it with licensing terror.]
  • Commission tried to hide details of 'WiFi4EU' glitch

    The European Commission has tried to hide information related to technical problems its free wifi fund portal suffered, by claiming that it was "out of scope".

    It released documents to EUobserver following an access to documents request - but heavily redacted some of the key papers.

    However, one of the documents has been leaked and published online. A comparison between the leaked version and the one released by the commission clearly shows that the commission went too far with its redactions.

  • The Flawed System Behind the Krack Wi-Fi Meltdown

    "If there is one thing to learn from this, it's that standards can't be closed off from security researchers," says Robert Graham, an analyst for the cybersecurity firm Erratasec. "The bug here is actually pretty easy to prevent, and pretty obvious. It's the fact that security researchers couldn't get their hands on the standards that meant that it was able to hide."

    The WPA2 protocol was developed by the Wi-Fi Alliance and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), which acts as a standards body for numerous technical industries, including wireless security. But unlike, say, Transport Layer Security, the popular cryptographic protocol used in web encryption, WPA2 doesn't make its specifications widely available. IEEE wireless security standards carry a retail cost of hundreds of dollars to access, and costs to review multiple interoperable standards can quickly add up to thousands of dollars.

OpenBSD: New Dnsmasq, New OpenSSH and New OpenBSD

Filed under
BSD

FOSS in Digital Currencies

Filed under
OSS
  • Braiins OS: An Open Source Alternative to Bitcoin Mining Firmware

    The company behind Slush Pool recently rolled out the initial release of its ASIC miner firmware: Braiins OS. The operating system is advertised as “the very first fully open-source, Linux-based system for cryptocurrency embedded devices,” an alternative to the factory-default firmware that comes with most popular mining hardware.

    Upon visiting the project’s website, visitors are greeted with a clear message, a mantra that resonates with its related industry’s ethos: “Take back control.”

  • Cryptoexchange Coinbase open sources its security scanner tool Salus

    The renowned United States-based cryptocurrency exchange, Coinbase always focuses on the security of its platform. Moreover, it has developed novel solutions to implementing security protocols to further strengthen their security. Furthermore, just recently, they announced that they are listing their security scanner execution tool, Salus as open source.

  • Crypto Exchange Coinbase Open-Sources Its Security Scaling Tool

    U.S.-based cryptocurrency exchange Coinbase is making a recently developed automated security scaling tool available to the public.

    Called Salus, after the Roman the goddess of safety and well-being, the program can automatically choose to run and configure different security scanners and issue a report on the results, according to a Thursday blog post from Coinbase developer Julian Borrey.

    Available as an open-source tool on GitHub from today, Salus is said to offer the advantage of being able to centrally coordinate security scans across a large number of software storage repositories, avoiding having to configure a scanner for each different project.

Suddenly Linux runs in Android

Filed under
Android
GNU
Linux

Yes, Android is based on a modified version of the Linux kernel. But once you’ve got Android running, you can utilize this app to get Linux running inside Android. But why, you might be asking – why would you want to do that? If you have to ask, you might just want to turn back now. With this app, users are able to run Debian or Ubuntu, games like Adventure or Zork, and Math systems like Gnuplot, Octave, and R.

UserLand allows one Session at a time and can also monitor filesystems. If you’re looking for a graphical interface, and not just a command line system, you might want to take a peek at the operating system Android. In other words: This is mostly just for fun, and a sort of proof of concept – but it has so much potential!

Read more

Linux Devices: ARM/Linux in Servers and Embedded, Chromecast

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Love Microsoft Teams? Love Linux? Then you won't love this

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Microsoft loves Linux. Unless you are a Linux user who happens to want to use Teams. In that case, you probably aren’t feeling the love quite so much.

Read more

Red Hat News and Developments

Filed under
Red Hat
  • The GNOME Infrastructure is moving to Openshift

    The cluster consists of 3 master nodes (controllers, api, etcd), 4 compute nodes and 2 infrastructure nodes (internal docker registry, cluster console, haproxy-based routers, SSL edge termination). For the persistent storage we’re currently making good use of the Red Hat Gluster Storage (RHGS) product that Red Hat is kindly sponsoring together with the Openshift subscriptions. For any app that might require a database we have an external (as not managed as part of Openshift) fully redundant, synchronous, multi-master MariaDB cluster based on Galera (2 data nodes, 1 arbiter).

    The release we’re currently running is the recently released 3.11, which comes with the so-called “Cluster Console”, a web UI that allows you to manage a wide set of the underlying objects that previously were only available to the oc cli client and with a set of Monitoring and Metrics toolings (Prometheus, Grafana) that can be accessed as part of the Cluster Console (Grafana dashboards that show how the cluster is behaving) or externally via their own route.

  • OpenShift Commons Gathering Seattle Announces Speakers from Intel, GE, Progressive, HealthPartners, TicketMaster, USAA and more!

    The OpenShift Commons Gathering brings together experts from all over the world to discuss the container technologies, best practices for cloud-native application developers and the open source software projects that underpin the OpenShift ecosystem to help take us all to the next level in cloud-native computing. This final Gathering of 2018 will feature 400+ developers, project leads, cloud architects, DevOps professionals, sysadmins, and cloud-native practitioners coming together to explore the next steps in making container technologies successful and secure at scale.

  • Modernize your application deployment with Lift and Shift

    For many software modernization projects, it’s all about learning to love, lift, and shift. No, wait. It’s all about learning to love lift and shift. The basic idea behind lift and shift is to modernize how an existing application is packaged and deployed. Because it’s not about rewriting the application itself, lift and shift is typically quick to implement.

    Modern development environments rely on containers for packaging and deployment. A modern environment also uses a continuous integration / continuous deployment (CI/CD) system that automatically builds, tests, and deploys an application whenever its source code changes.

  • Istio on OpenShift: Technology Preview 2 of Service Mesh Now Available

    It’s been a few weeks since the release of the first tech preview of Istio on OpenShift. Since then a lot has happened, and we are happy to announce the availability of our second tech preview release.

    In this release we are adding a whole new user interface from the upstream Kiali project. The Kiali user interface can help Istio users understand what’s happening in their service mesh, canl show how the various components are connected, and can help to detect issues (HTTP 500, pod not started, misconfigurations) to better fix those.

  • Insider Selling: Red Hat Inc (RHT) EVP Sells 960 Shares of Stock
  • Featured Stock: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Scout Investments Inc. Acquires 3,034 Shares of Red Hat Inc (RHT)
  • Get "The Art of Modern Application Development" the Red Hat way - eBook, free [Ed: Apparently a paid-for ad]

Games: Steam Play Games, Puzlogic, and Rocket League ‘RocketID’ Delays

Filed under
Gaming

MidnightBSD Hits 1.0! Checkout What’s New

Filed under
BSD

A couple days ago, Lucas Holt announced the release of MidnightBSD 1.0. Let’s take a quick look at what is included in this new release.

Read more

Android Integration Extension For Gnome GSConnect v13 Stable Released

Filed under
Android
GNOME

The latest GSConnect v13, released today, is a rewrite with with changes to the architecture, settings and default behavior, and it requires Gnome Shell 3.28 or 3.30. The new version includes redesigned settings, Do Not Disturb mode, quick reply from notifications, and other features and improvements.

GSConnect is a complete KDE Connect protocol implementation written in GJS for Gnome Shell, which integrates Android devices with your Gnome desktop. Using it, you can easily send files between your Gnome desktop and Android smartphone, sync the clipboard or notifications between the two devices, browse files wirelessly on your Android device from your desktop, and much more.

Read more

Mozilla: WebRender, Spoke, Encrypted SNI, Blender, Opus 1.3

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • WebRender newsletter #26

    Here comes the 26th issue of WebRender’s newsletter.

  • Getting serious about political ad transparency with Ad Analysis for Facebook

    Do you know who is trying to influence your vote online? The votes of your friends and neighbors? Would you even know how to find out? Despite all the talk of election security, the tech industry still falls short on political ad transparency. With the U.S. midterm elections mere weeks away, this is a big problem.

    We can’t solve this problem alone, but we can help by making it more visible and easier to understand. Today we are announcing the release of our experimental extension, Ad Analysis for Facebook, to give you greater transparency into the online advertisements, including political ads, you see on Facebook.

  • Introducing Spoke: Make your own custom 3D social scenes

    Today we’re thrilled to announce the beta release of Spoke: the easiest way to create your own custom social 3D scenes you can use with Hubs.

    Over the last year, our Social Mixed Reality team has been developing Hubs, a WebVR-based social experience that runs right in your browser. In Hubs, you can communicate naturally in VR or on your phone or PC by simply sharing a link.

    Along the way, we’ve added features that enable social presence, self-expression, and content sharing. We’ve also offered a variety of scenes to choose from, like a castle space, an atrium, and even a wide open space high in the sky.

  • Encrypted SNI Comes to Firefox Nightly

    Firefox Nightly now supports encrypting the TLS Server Name Indication (SNI) extension, which helps prevent attackers on your network from learning your browsing history. You can enable encrypted SNI today and it will automatically work with any site that supports it. Currently, that means any site hosted by Cloudflare, but we’re hoping other providers will add ESNI support soon.

  • If you build it (together), they will come…

    Mozilla and the Khronos Group collaborate to bring glTF capabilities to Blender

    Mozilla is committed to the next wave of creativity in the open Web, in which people can access, create and share immersive VR and AR experiences across platforms and devices. What it takes though is an enthusiastic, skilled and growing community of creators, artists, and also businesses forming a healthy ecosystem, as well as tool support for web developers who build content for it. To overcome a fragmented environment and to allow for broad adoption, we need the leading content format to be open, and frameworks and toolsets to be efficient and interoperable. Ensuring that tools for creation, modification and viewing are open to the entire community and that there aren’t gatekeepers to creativity is one of the main working areas for Mozilla’s Mixed Reality (WebXR) Team. Building on its “Open by Design” strategy Open Innovation partnered with that team around Lars Bergstrom to find neat, yet impactful ways to stimulate external collaboration, co-development and co-funding of technology.

  • Mozilla Productivity Tip: Managing try pushes

    I tend to do a lot of try pushes for testing changes to Gecko and other stuff, and by using one of TreeHerder's (apparently) lesser-known features, managing these pushes to see their results is really easy. If you have trouble managing your try pushes, consider this:

    Open a tab with an author filter for yourself. You can do this by clicking on your email address on any of your try pushes (see highlighted area in screenshot below). Keep this tab open, forever. By default it shows you the last 10 try pushes you did, and if you leave it open, it will auto-update to show newer try pushes that you do.

  • Opus 1.3 Released - One Of The Leading Lossy Open-Source Audio Codecs

    Opus 1.3 features improvements to allow using SILK with bitrates down to around 5kb/s, wideband encoding down to 9kb/s, improved Ambisonics support, better security hardening, a new speech/music detector, and more.

  • Introducing Opus 1.3

    The Opus Audio Codec gets another major update with the release of version 1.3 (demo).

    Opus is a totally open, royalty-free audio codec that can be used for all audio applications, from music streaming and storage to high-quality video-conferencing and VoIP. Six years after its standardization by the IETF, Opus is now included in all major browsers and mobile operating systems. It has been adopted for a wide range of applications, and is the default WebRTC codec.

Fedora 29 Is Blocked From Release Due To 11 Open Bugs

Filed under
Red Hat

Fedora 29 will not be managing to deliver its final release right on time due to lingering blocker bugs.

At the first Fedora 29 Final meeting today it was declared a No-Go for releasing next week on 23 October as had been planned.

Read more

Keynotes announced for LibrePlanet 2019 free software conference

Filed under
GNU

Ubuntu: Infographic, New Releases, Ubuntu Podcast and Statistics

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Infographic: Snaps in numbers

    Coinciding with the release of Ubuntu 18.10 today, we have celebrated the exceptional adoption of snaps by sharing the infographic below. From popular snaps to daily installs, this infographic demonstrates where, when and why users are installing and adopting the secure, Linux application format. For more commentary around these numbers, check out this recent blog. Alternatively, start installing your chosen snaps.

  • Ubuntu 18.10:Multi-cloud,new desktop theme & enhanced snap integration

    Canonical today announced the release of Ubuntu 18.10, focused on multi-cloud deployments, AI software development, a new community desktop theme and richer snap desktop integration.

    “Ubuntu is now the world’s reference platform for AI engineering and analytics” said Mark Shuttleworth, CEO of Canonical. “We accelerate developer productivity and help enterprises operate at speed and at scale, across multiple clouds and diverse edge appliances.”

    This year, the financial services industry has engaged significantly with Canonical and Ubuntu for infrastructure efficiency on-premise and to accelerate their move to the cloud. The push for machine learning analytics and of fintech efforts around blockchain, distributed ledger applications and cryptocurrencies are current drivers of Ubuntu investments and deployments.

  • Ubuntu Studio 18.10 Released

    The Ubuntu Studio team is pleased to announce the release of Ubuntu Studio 18.10 “Cosmic Cuttlefish”. As a regular release, this version of Ubuntu Studio will be supported for 9 months.

    Since it’s just out, you may experience some issues, so you might want to wait a bit before upgrading. Please see the release notes for a complete list of changes and known issues.

  • Ubuntu MATE: Ubuntu MATE 18.10 Final Release

    Ubuntu MATE 18.10 is a modest, yet strategic, upgrade over our 18.04 release. If you want bug fixes and improved hardware support then 18.10 is for you. For those who prefer staying on the LTS then everything in this 18.10 release is also important for the upcoming 18.04.2 release. Oh yeah, we've also made a bespoke Ubuntu MATE 18.10 image for the GPD Pocket and GPD Pocket 2.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E32 – Thirty-Two Going on Spinster

    This week we interview Daniel Foré about the final release of elementary 5.0 (Juno), bring you some Android love and go over all your feedback.

    It’s Season 11 Episode 32 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Canonical have released some statistics from the Ubuntu installer survey

    When installing Ubuntu 18.04, Canonical's installer will offer to send some statistics to them. Canonical have now released some of this. One thing to note, is that this data does not include Ubuntu Server, Ubuntu Core, cloud images or and any other Ubuntu derivatives that don't include the report in their own installer.

    They've had some good results from it, with 66% of people sending them their data. It's a nice start, but I think they really need to do some separation of physical and virtual machines, since it seems they're merged together which will skew a bunch of the data I would imagine.

Linux-driven embedded PCs target autonomous cars

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Kontron announced two Ubuntu-driven computers for autonomous vehicles. The S2000 is a lab dev platform with a Xeon 8160T and the EvoTRAC S1901 offers a choice of Kontron modules including a new Atom C3000 based, Type 7 COMe-bDV7R.

Kontron has launched a Kontron’s S2000 Development Platform for developing autonomous in-vehicle computers and is prepping an EvoTRAC S1901 in-vehicle PC for use in advanced automotive applications, including autonomous vehicles. Both systems ship with Intel processors running a pre-installed Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Linux stack. The systems follow earlier Kontron automotive computers such as the EvoTrac G102 in-vehicle cellular gateway.

Read more

OpenBSD 6.4 Released - Disables SMT/HT By Default, Updates Radeon DRM

Filed under
BSD

Adding to the exciting release day is Theo de Raadt releasing OpenBSD 6.4 as the newest version of this BSD operating system known for its security mindfulness.

Exciting us from a technical standpoint and for anyone using OpenBSD on the desktop is a newer Radeon DRM display driver, but it's still very dated compared to what is found in the mainline Linux kernel. Their Radeon DRM driver is now synced against the Linux 4.4.155 LTS upstream state that then provides mode-setting support for various GCN 1.0/1.1 graphics cards as a new feature to OpenBSD... But newer GPUs and the many other open-source AMD improvements past Linux 4.4 haven't made their way into the OpenBSD world yet. Even still, Radeon graphics remain among the best supported options for what is available to OpenBSD users. The Radeon DRM code is also now available for 64-bit ARM OpenBSD users.

Read more

Direct: OpenBSD 6.4

LWN: OpenBSD 6.4

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 OpenCL, CUDA, TensorFlow GPU Compute Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Here are the first of our benchmarks for the GeForce RTX 2070 graphics card that launched this week. In our inaugural Ubuntu Linux benchmarking with the GeForce RTX 2070 is a look at the OpenCL / CUDA GPU computing performance including with TensorFlow and various models being tested on the GPU. The benchmarks are compared to an assortment of available graphics cards and also include metrics for power consumption, performance-per-Watt, and performance-per-dollar.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

FOSS in Digital Currencies

  • Braiins OS: An Open Source Alternative to Bitcoin Mining Firmware
    The company behind Slush Pool recently rolled out the initial release of its ASIC miner firmware: Braiins OS. The operating system is advertised as “the very first fully open-source, Linux-based system for cryptocurrency embedded devices,” an alternative to the factory-default firmware that comes with most popular mining hardware. Upon visiting the project’s website, visitors are greeted with a clear message, a mantra that resonates with its related industry’s ethos: “Take back control.”
  • Cryptoexchange Coinbase open sources its security scanner tool Salus
    The renowned United States-based cryptocurrency exchange, Coinbase always focuses on the security of its platform. Moreover, it has developed novel solutions to implementing security protocols to further strengthen their security. Furthermore, just recently, they announced that they are listing their security scanner execution tool, Salus as open source.
  • Crypto Exchange Coinbase Open-Sources Its Security Scaling Tool
    U.S.-based cryptocurrency exchange Coinbase is making a recently developed automated security scaling tool available to the public. Called Salus, after the Roman the goddess of safety and well-being, the program can automatically choose to run and configure different security scanners and issue a report on the results, according to a Thursday blog post from Coinbase developer Julian Borrey. Available as an open-source tool on GitHub from today, Salus is said to offer the advantage of being able to centrally coordinate security scans across a large number of software storage repositories, avoiding having to configure a scanner for each different project.

Suddenly Linux runs in Android

Yes, Android is based on a modified version of the Linux kernel. But once you’ve got Android running, you can utilize this app to get Linux running inside Android. But why, you might be asking – why would you want to do that? If you have to ask, you might just want to turn back now. With this app, users are able to run Debian or Ubuntu, games like Adventure or Zork, and Math systems like Gnuplot, Octave, and R. UserLand allows one Session at a time and can also monitor filesystems. If you’re looking for a graphical interface, and not just a command line system, you might want to take a peek at the operating system Android. In other words: This is mostly just for fun, and a sort of proof of concept – but it has so much potential! Read more

Linux Devices: ARM/Linux in Servers and Embedded, Chromecast

Love Microsoft Teams? Love Linux? Then you won't love this

Microsoft loves Linux. Unless you are a Linux user who happens to want to use Teams. In that case, you probably aren’t feeling the love quite so much. Read more