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Thursday, 12 Dec 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Devices: Axiomtek, Vecow and Canonical on Robotics

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Tiny i.MX6 UL DIN-rail computer has dual mini-PCIe slots

    Axiomtek’s compact, rugged “Agent200-FL-DC” DIN-rail computer runs Linux on a low-power i.MX6 UL. Features include 10/100 Ethernet, USB, serial, DIO, optional CAN, and 2x mini-PCIe with a SIM slot.

    Axiomtek has posted product details for a “coming soon” Agent200-FL-DC DIN-rail computer. Like last year’s similar IFB125 and the IFB122 from 2017, the Agent200-FL-DC is a headless gateway that runs a Yocto based Linux stack on NXP’s 528MHz Cortex-A7 based i.MX6 UltraLight (UL) SoC. This time it’s Yocto 2.4 “Rocko” running on a newer Linux kernel 4.9.88. This is the only one of the three that also supports Ubuntu 18.04 (with the same kernel), as well as Android 8.1.

  • Huge Coffee Lake Refresh system has four PCIe slots for Nvidia and AMD graphics

    Vecow’s rugged, Linux-friendly “GPC-1000” computer has 8th or 9th Gen CPUs with up to 64GB DDR4 and provides 4x PCIe slots that support dual-slot graphics.

  • Key considerations when choosing a robot?s operating system

Mesa 19.3.0 Released

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Mesa 19.3.0 Release Notes / 2019-12-12

    Mesa 19.3.0 is a new development release. People who are concerned with stability and reliability should stick with a previous release or wait for Mesa 19.3.1.

    Mesa 19.3.0 implements the OpenGL 4.6 API, but the version reported by glGetString(GL_VERSION) or glGetIntegerv(GL_MAJOR_VERSION) / glGetIntegerv(GL_MINOR_VERSION) depends on the particular driver being used. Some drivers don't support all the features required in OpenGL 4.6. OpenGL 4.6 is only available if requested at context creation. Compatibility contexts may report a lower version depending on each driver.

    Mesa 19.3.0 implements the Vulkan 1.1 API, but the version reported by the apiVersion property of the VkPhysicalDeviceProperties struct depends on the particular driver being used.

  • Mesa 19.3 Released With Big Updates For Intel's Open-Source Drivers, Valve ACO Option

    After a few weeks worth of delays due to blocker bugs the release of Mesa 19.3 is out today as a big end-of-year upgrade to the open-source OpenGL and Vulkan drivers for Linux systems. Intel and AMD Radeon driver changes largely dominate the work as always but there is a growing number of embedded driver changes and other enhancements for this crucial piece to the open-source 3D ecosystem.

Python Programming, Rust and Puppet Enterprise 3

Filed under
Development
  • Circuit Python at PyConf Hyderabad

    Coding in/with hardware has become my biggest stress buster for me ever since I have been introduced to it in PyCon Pune 2017 by John. Coding with hardware provides a real-life interaction with the code you write. It flourishes creativity. I can do all of this while I learn something new. Now I look for auctions to offer me a chance to code in/with Hardware. It gives the chance to escape the muggle world.

  • New in testmon 1.0.0

    Significant portions of testmon have been rewritten for v 1.0.1. Although the UI is mostly the same, there are some significant differences.

  • Determining affected tests

    Automatically determining affected tests sounds too good to be true. Python developers rightfully have a suspecting attitude towards any tool which tries to be too clever about their source code. Code completion and symbol searching doesn't need to be 100% reliable but messing with the test suite execution? This page explains what testmon tries and what it does not try to achieve.

    [...]

    After running the test with coverage analysis and parsing the source code, testmon determines which blocks does test_s.py::test_add depend on. In our example it's Block 1,2 and 4. (and not Block 3). testmon doesn't store the whole code of the block but just a checksum of it. Block 3 can be changed to anything. As long as the Block 1,2 and 4 stay the same, the execution path for test_s.py::test_add and it's outcome will stay the same.

  • How to set-up and use py.test in Pycharm

    I've been using Vim and terminal as a weapon of choice for years. I've had a good time with it, however, more and more people ask me why I'm using this setup. And honestly, I don't know the answer.

    I'm aware that things can be done more efficiently and an IDE can help with a lot of things. I guess that my weak spot is the unit tests and testing my code in general. I'm not running my tests when on the coding spree, I'm breaking lots of stuff, and only when I think I'm finished, I'll do the fixing and make everything running green again.

    Well, I would like to change that. And I'm also curious about trying out new ways of doing things. The obvious choice for programming in Python is the PyCharm. It's a nice IDE, supports many features that I like and most importantly, it can help with the testing. PyCharm can easily integrate with popular test frameworks and run the tests for me.

  • This Week in Rust 316
  • Continuous Delivery for Puppet Enterprise 3.0 is now available

    I am very excited to announce the immediate availability of Continuous Delivery for Puppet Enterprise 3.0! Over the last year, we’ve taken to heart the challenges and recommendations our customers have shared with us on how we can make Continuous Delivery for Puppet Enterprise better. Our intent is to be truly customer-obsessed, meet our customers where they are, and help them get to where they want to be. This release focuses on our customers’ needs by providing more context into the impact of a proposed Puppet change by offering Hiera support for Impact Analysis, a simplified approach to defining pipelines as code, and the ability to easily compose custom deployment processes (currently in beta!). Let’s dive in!

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Headlines, Ubuntu Podcast and Bad Voltage

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • 2019-12-12 | Linux Headlines

    KDE's release service has a fresh batch of updates, Electron joins the OpenJS Foundation, VirtualBox 6.1 brings nested virtualization to Intel CPUs, and Vim levels up with a fun game to showcase the release of version 8.2.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S12E36 – Desert Strike

    This week we’ve been making a low latency point-to-point game streaming application, discuss what it takes to create each Ubuntu distro release, bring you some command line love and go over the last of your feedback for 2019.

    It’s Season 12 Episode 36 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Bad Voltage 2×61: Frankly Much Smarter

    Stuart Langridge, Jono Bacon, and Jeremy Garcia present Bad Voltage, in which a tenth of a point is more important than one might think it is, Mother Shipton is turning in her grave, and:

Vim 8.2 is available!

Filed under
Software

Before I did the keynote at VimConf 2018 I asked plugin developers what they wanted from Vim. The result was a very long list of requested features. The top two items were clear: Popup windows and text properties.
After more than a year of development the new features are now ready for the Vim crowds. Popup windows make it possible to show messages, function prototypes, code snippets and anything else on top of the text being edited. They open and close quickly and can be highlighted in many ways. More about that below.

This was no small effort. Although the existing window support could be used, popup windows are different enough to require a lot of extra logic. Especially to update the screen efficiently. Also to make it easy for plugin writers to use them; you don't need to tell Vim exactly where to show one, just give a reference point and the text to display, Vim will figure out the size and where the popup fits best.

Text properties can be used for something as simple as highlighting a text snippet or something as complicated as using an external parser to locate syntax items and highlight them asynchronously. This can be used instead of the pattern based syntax highlighting. A text property sticks with the text, also when inserting a word before it. And this is done efficiently by storing the properties with the text.

The new change listener support can be used to keep the highlighting up-to-date and support other LSP features. An example of what can be done with this is the "govim" plugin. It connects to a server (written in Go) and uses "gopls", the Language Server Protocol (LSP) server for Go. You can find a list of features with links to demo videos on github. A couple of screenshots are below.

Read more

Also: Vim 8.2 Released With Support For Popup Windows

Deepin Linux Review: Stylish Distro or Spyware?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Reviews

Deepin is a rising star among Linux distributions, thanks to its combination of an elegant desktop environment with the stability and reliability of Debian. But Deepin is also a divisive Linux distribution, both because of its Chinese origin and some arguable choices by its creators. Where does it diverge from the alternatives? What does it offer compared to other distributions? How is it in actual everyday use? Do you have to worry about the safety of your data if you use it as your primary operating system?

Read more

Games: Game Awards, Unity (Mono) and Hive Time

Filed under
Gaming
  • Try multiple upcoming Linux games like CARRION and SkateBIRD for 48 hours during The Game Awards

    The Game Awards is back and so Steam is doing a Game Festival to go along with it, with multiple upcoming games putting up a special limited-time demo. There's also sales, again.

    You might want to be quick, as the demos are only valid until December 13 at 6PM UTC. Below are the games that have a Linux demo available to try out.

    Spiritfarer - a cozy management game about dying. You play Stella, ferrymaster to the deceased, a Spiritfarer. Build a boat to explore the world, then befriend and care for spirits before finally releasing them into the afterlife.

  • Fully supported Unity Editor for Linux delayed, Unity 2019.3 in the final testing stages

    Two bits of big news about the Unity game engine to share today, one specifically about Linux and one about the Unity engine as a whole.

    Firstly, remember the team at Unity announced back in May that the Unity Editor for Linux was going to be fully supported instead of staying experimental? Well, sadly the release date slipped. Still happening though! In an update to the original blog post announcing it, they said it's been pushed from 2019.3 and so it's now happening in 2020. No exact date or version number for when it happens is being given. When we get more news about the Unity Editor getting a date again to move from experimental to supported, we will let you know.

  • Build and manage a totally scientifically inaccurate Beehive in Hive Time, out now

    Keep busy Bees, grow your hive, make some sweet honey and produce a new Queen before your current one dies of old age. That's mostly the aim of the game in Hive Time, with colourful visuals and a family friendly theme encased in a sublime soundtrack from Peter Silk it's quite lovely overall.

Zorin OS 15.1 is Released: A Better Way to Work, Learn and Play

Filed under
OS
Linux

Just over 6 months ago, we launched Zorin OS 15, our most advanced and refined operating system ever. Since then, it’s been downloaded over 550,000 times around the world. Over 65% of these downloads were coming from Windows and macOS, reflecting our mission to bring the power of Linux to people who’ve never had access to it before. We would like to take this opportunity to thank every one of you for making this release as big and impactful as it has been.

Today, we’re excited to announce that Zorin OS is getting even better with the release of version 15.1. We’ve paid close attention to your feedback and worked hard to make the desktop experience better for work, learning, playing, and everything in between. We’ve focused on making the desktop feel even more familiar and user-friendly to new users, especially those moving away from Windows 7 leading up to the end of its support in one month.

Read more

Also: Zorin OS 15.1 Released with Better Microsoft Office Compatibility, GameMode

Zorin OS 15.1 Released with LibreOffice 6.3, Dark Mode Scheduling

Nvidia Linux/BSD Graphics Driver Adds Support for Quadro T2000 with Max-Q Design

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
BSD

Coming just three weeks after the Nvidia 440.36 driver, which introduced support for the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1650 SUPER graphics card, the Nvidia 440.44 graphics driver is here to add support for the Nvidia Quadro T2000 with Max-Q Design graphics card on Linux, BSD, and Solaris systems, as well as support for the __GL_SYNC_DISPLAY_DEVICE environment variable for Vulkan apps on GNU/Linux systems.

The Nvidia 440.44 proprietary graphics driver also improves installation support on Oracle Linux 7.7 systems where the Nvidia kernel module could fail to build with the "unknown type name 'vm_fault_t'" error, and addresses a bug discovered in an error handling path, which could cause a Linux kernel crash while loading the nvidia.ko module.

Read more

Proteus Device is a secure, Linux-based handheld (not a smartphone)

Filed under
Linux

The Proteus Device from XXLSEC is a handheld computer with a 5 inch touchscreen display and a secure, Linux-based operating system called PriveOS.

At first glance, it looks a lot like a smartphone. But the Proteus Device does not have a cellular modem and it’s not designed to make phone calls.

What it does have that you won’t find on most phones, is an Ethernet port.

Read more

Why secure web-based applications with Kali Linux?

Filed under
Linux
Web

The security of web-based applications is of critical importance. The strength of an application is about more than the collection of features it provides. It includes essential (yet often overlooked) elements such as security.

Kali Linux is a trusted critical component of a security professional’s toolkit for securing web applications. The official documentation says it is “is specifically geared to meet the requirements of professional penetration testing and security auditing.“ Incidences of security breaches in web-based applications can be largely contained through the deployment of Kali Linux’s suite of up-to-date software.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Which Ubuntu Release (2010-2019) is Your Favourite? Vote Now!

    With the end of the year, and indeed the decade, fast approaching I’ve been spending my time looking backwards, getting all misty-eyed and nostalgic about Ubuntu and how far its come since 2010.

  • OpenBSD Local Privilege Escalation Vulnerability (CVE-2019-19726)

    This vulnerability exists in OpenBSD’s dynamic loader versions of OpenBSD 6.5 and OpenBSD 6.6. It is exploitable in the default installation (via the set-user-ID executable chpass or passwd) and could allow local users or malicious software to gain full root privileges. For more technical details on this vulnerability, please see our security advisory. Also refer to our recently published OpenBSD blog post.

  • Microsoft begins Windows 10's 1809-to-1909 compulsory upgrade

    Microsoft has begun forcibly upgrading Windows 10 PCs running version 1809 with the latest, the November 2019 Update, aka 1909, which the company launched less than a month ago.

  • Xs:code launches subscription platform to monetize open-source projects [Ed: This is basically about making proprietary software add-ons, betraying Free software premises]

    Open source is a great source of free tools for developers, but as these projects proliferate, and some gain in popularity, the creators sometimes look for ways to monetize successful ones. The problem is that it’s hard to run a subscription-based, dual-license approach, and most developers don’t even know where to start. Enter Israeli startup xs:code, which has created a platform to help developers solve this problem.

    “Xs:code is a monetization platform for open-source projects. Unlike donation platforms which are pretty popular today, xs:code allows open-source developers to provide added value in exchange for payments. That comes on top of what they offer for free. This added value can be a different license, more features, support services or anything they can think of,” Netanel Mohoni, co-founder and CEO of xs:code told TechCrunch.

    This does not mean the open-source part of this goes away, only that the company is providing a platform for those developers who want to monetize their work, Mohoni said. “Companies pay for accessing the code, and they enjoy better software created by motivated developers who are now compensated for their work. Because our solution makes sure that the code remains open source, developers can continue accepting contributions so the community enjoys better code than ever before,” he explained.

  • The Linux Foundation's Automated Compliance Work Garners New Funding, Advances Tools Development [Ed: Of course the Linux Foundation is still promoting Microsoft GitHub (proprietary) and outsourcing everything to it]
  • The Linux Foundation’s Automated Compliance Work Garners New Funding, Advances Tools Development [Ed: The Corporate Linux Foundation is again whitewashing and openwashing a major GPL violator, VMware]

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced founding member commitments from Google, Siemens and VMware for the Automated Compliance Tooling (ACT), as well as key advancements for tools that increase ease and adoption of open source software.

    Using open source code comes with a responsibility to comply with the terms of that code’s license. The goal of ACT is to consolidate investments in these efforts and to increase interoperability and usability of open source compliance tooling. Google, Siemens and VMware are among the companies helping to underwrite and lead this collaborative work.

  • If you ARIA label something, give it a role

    As a rule of thumb, if you label something via aria-label or aria-labelledby, make sure it has a proper widget or landmark role.

    The longer version is that several elements created extraneous amount of announcements in screen readers in the past that were not really useful. Especially in the ARIA 1.0 days where a lot of things weren’t as clear and people were still gathering experience, this was an issue for elements or roles that mapped to regions, multiple landmarks of the same type on a page, etc. Therefore, best practice has become to label both widgets (which should be labeled anyway), and landmarks with means such as aria-label or aria-labelledby, to make them more useful.

  • Twitter Makes A Bet On Protocols Over Platforms

    It looks like Twitter is making a bet on protocols over platforms for its future.

Latte bug fix release v0.9.5

Filed under
KDE

Latte Dock v0.9.5 has been released containing important fixes and improvements!

Read more

HP Linux Imaging & Printing Drivers Are Now Supported on Debian GNU/Linux 10.2

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

HP Linux Imaging and Printing (HPLIP) software, an open-source and free print, scan and fax driver solution for HP printers and scanners, has been updated today to version 3.19.12 for Linux-based operating systems.
HPLIP 3.19.12 is here to add support for several new printers, including HP Color LaserJet Pro M256dn, HP Color LaserJet Pro M255dn, HP Color LaserJet Pro M256nw, HP Color LaserJet Pro M255nw, HP Color LaserJet Pro M256dw, HP Color LaserJet Pro M255dw, HP Color LaserJet Pro M155a, HP Color LaserJet Pro M156a, HP Color LaserJet Pro M155nw, HP Color LaserJet Pro M156nw, HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M282nw, and HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M284nw.

Additionally, HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M283fdn, HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M285fdn, HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M283fdw, HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M285fdw, HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M283cdw, HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M285cdw, HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M182n, HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M184n, HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M182nw, HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M184nw, HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M183fw, and HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M185fw are also supported by the new version.

Read more

Also: HPLIP 3.19.12 Released with New Printers Support

AMD Radeon RX 5500 XT Linux Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

AMD today is shipping the Radeon RX 5500 XT as the new sub-$200 Navi graphics card. This 7nm graphics card offers 22 compute units, 1408 stream processors, up to 5.6 TFLOPS of compute power, 4GB or 8GB GDDR6 video memory options, and built atop their modern RDNA architecture and supporting features in common with the RX 5700 series like PCIe 4.0 support. Here is a look at the initial Linux gaming performance of the AMD Radeon RX 5500 XT with various gaming benchmarks and Steam Play tests as well.

The Radeon RX 5500 XT 4GB version is launching at $169 USD while the Radeon RX 5500 XT 8GB version will command $199 USD. These price points put them comparable to the current Radeon RX 580 / 590 retail cards. AMD markets the RX 5500 XT as offering 1.6x the performance-per-Watt of the original Polaris Radeon RX 480 and designed for 1080p gaming to go up against NVIDIA's GeForce GTX 1650 SUPER graphics card.

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KDE's December 2019 Apps Update

Filed under
KDE

The release of new versions for KDE applications is part of KDE’s continued effort to bring you a complete and up-to-date catalog of fully-featured, beautiful and useful programs for your system.

Available now are new versions of KDE’s file browser Dolphin; Kdenlive, one of the most complete open source video editors; the document viewer Okular; KDE’s image viewer, Gwenview; and all of your other favorite KDE apps and utilities. All of these applications have been improved, making them faster and more stable and they boast exciting new features. The new versions of KDE applications let you be productive and creative, while at the same time making use of KDE software easy and fun.

We hope you enjoy all the novel features and improvements worked into all of KDE’s apps!

Read more

Also: KDE Applications 19.12 Open-Source Software Suite Released, Here's What's New

KDE Applications 19.12 Released With Big Improvements To Kdenlive + Other KDE Programs

Games: Feral Interactive, Fantasy Strike, GNU/Linux as Gaming Platform

Filed under
Gaming
  • Seems like Feral Interactive may have a few surprises for Linux in 2020

    Porting studio Feral Interactive [Official Site] have already given Linux a lot of games and it sounds like more are coming.

    While this year they've already released Shadow of the Tomb Raider Definitive Edition, a Vulkan beta for Shadow of Mordor, Total War: THREE KINGDOMS and DiRT 4 plus plus big updates/expansions to Company of Heroes 2 and Total War: WARHAMMER II. Still to come is Life is Strange 2, which Feral previously teased to arrive sometime soon.

  • Fighting game Fantasy Strike adds full cross-platform online play with PC and Consoles

    The very pretty fighting game Fantasy Strike from Sirlin Games just got a great update, enabling cross-platform online play between Linux/macOS/Windows and the Nintendo Switch and Playstation 4 consoles.

    Apply to all online modes including Casual and Ranked, find a match should be a lot easier now. You can also challenge or spectate others from your in-game friends list, which also works across all platforms too as you can add people from any platform based on tags.

  • Looking towards other operating systems

    Learning a new operating system from scratch is a daunting experience for many people. Fortunately, there are a few Linux distributions that come with a Windows-like desktop environment such as a form of a star bar at the bottom. However, Windows and Linux operating on vastly different philosophies, to the way that they are organized to the way that the files are handled. Linux employs the traditional monolithic kernel and it provides a hierarchical view of the files. Because it is modular, most of the necessary drivers can be loaded and unloaded dynamically. One of the major appeals of Linux is that it is open-source, compared to Microsoft which is a closed and inaccessible environment. Windows is made for simple and out of the box use and directed toward inexperienced users, a reason why the OS has been adopted by so many people. Linux puts more emphasis on the user, who has the possibility of customizing the desktop environment to suit their needs. Windows also offer a few, but fairly limited customization options.

    The main reason why people avoid switching to Linux is their gaming habits. Linux is known for not playing well with most PC games. Most PC games are being developed with Windows as the main platforms with some companies providing Linux support sometime after the original release. Games that do not have a Linux release require third party compatibility applications to run Windows games. The major application that is used to play Windows games on Linux is Wine. The developers of Wine have specified that the software is not an emulator but more of a compatibility layer for Linux to run Windows programs, not just games. In the world of programming, Wine is considered a masterpiece and one of the greatest feats of open source development that allows most Windows binaries to run on Linux without relying on any of Microsoft’s dependencies. Most of the Wine resources are dedicated to running the complicated frameworks of various DirectX components.

    [...]

    Many people prefer to enjoy online gaming, especially casino games. The beauty of these games is that most are available and can be played directly in the browser. The default browser that Linux uses is Mozilla Firefox, which itself, is a powerful browser. Because online casinos are played directly in the browser, there is almost no difference between playing them on Linux and playing them in Windows. There are also casino games that can be downloaded with most of them being made to run only on Windows due to a large number of people using the OS. As mentioned before, to run most Windows software, players have the option to use WINE. However, since because playing the casinos using the browser, most people are better off sticking with that version. Many games from online roulette to poker, and other table games are available online. Almost all online casinos found online have the option to play instantly with no download required, which is why any OS that can run a browser is perfectly capable to run casino games. Linux has been around for a long time, but it was only in the last 10 years that people have started noticing the operating system becoming more friendlier and easy to learn. Besides the many desktop environments, customizability, community and growing compatibility of games, as well as more security, many have started the transition from Windows to Linux.

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More in Tux Machines

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Headlines, Ubuntu Podcast and Bad Voltage

  • 2019-12-12 | Linux Headlines

    KDE's release service has a fresh batch of updates, Electron joins the OpenJS Foundation, VirtualBox 6.1 brings nested virtualization to Intel CPUs, and Vim levels up with a fun game to showcase the release of version 8.2.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S12E36 – Desert Strike

    This week we’ve been making a low latency point-to-point game streaming application, discuss what it takes to create each Ubuntu distro release, bring you some command line love and go over the last of your feedback for 2019. It’s Season 12 Episode 36 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Bad Voltage 2×61: Frankly Much Smarter

    Stuart Langridge, Jono Bacon, and Jeremy Garcia present Bad Voltage, in which a tenth of a point is more important than one might think it is, Mother Shipton is turning in her grave, and:

Vim 8.2 is available!

Before I did the keynote at VimConf 2018 I asked plugin developers what they wanted from Vim. The result was a very long list of requested features. The top two items were clear: Popup windows and text properties. After more than a year of development the new features are now ready for the Vim crowds. Popup windows make it possible to show messages, function prototypes, code snippets and anything else on top of the text being edited. They open and close quickly and can be highlighted in many ways. More about that below. This was no small effort. Although the existing window support could be used, popup windows are different enough to require a lot of extra logic. Especially to update the screen efficiently. Also to make it easy for plugin writers to use them; you don't need to tell Vim exactly where to show one, just give a reference point and the text to display, Vim will figure out the size and where the popup fits best. Text properties can be used for something as simple as highlighting a text snippet or something as complicated as using an external parser to locate syntax items and highlight them asynchronously. This can be used instead of the pattern based syntax highlighting. A text property sticks with the text, also when inserting a word before it. And this is done efficiently by storing the properties with the text. The new change listener support can be used to keep the highlighting up-to-date and support other LSP features. An example of what can be done with this is the "govim" plugin. It connects to a server (written in Go) and uses "gopls", the Language Server Protocol (LSP) server for Go. You can find a list of features with links to demo videos on github. A couple of screenshots are below. Read more Also: Vim 8.2 Released With Support For Popup Windows

Deepin Linux Review: Stylish Distro or Spyware?

Deepin is a rising star among Linux distributions, thanks to its combination of an elegant desktop environment with the stability and reliability of Debian. But Deepin is also a divisive Linux distribution, both because of its Chinese origin and some arguable choices by its creators. Where does it diverge from the alternatives? What does it offer compared to other distributions? How is it in actual everyday use? Do you have to worry about the safety of your data if you use it as your primary operating system? Read more

today's howtos