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Tuesday, 24 Sep 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Hippocratic License: Open Source License Against the Likes of ICE

Filed under
News

Coraline Ada Ehmke has created “Hippocratic License” that “add ethics to open source projects”. But this seems to be just the beginning of a controversy as the “Hippocratic License” may not be open source at all.
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HAT offers hardware watchdog for Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Linux

On Kickstarter: Sequent Microsystems has launched a $15 “Hardware Watchdog HAT & Power Manager for Raspberry Pi” for protecting against software lock-ups.

Hardware-based watchdog timers are usually standard equipment on industrial computers, but are rarely seen on Linux hacker boards. Sequent Microsystems, which has previously launched Raspberry Pi add-ons such as the MegaIO-IND home automation board, has now successfully launched a Hardware Watchdog HAT & Power Manager for Raspberry Pi. The HAT is available on Kickstarter through Oct. 17 for $15 for Jan. 2020 delivery or $20 for Nov. 2019 delivery.

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KDE Plasma 5.17 Desktop Environment Enters Beta, Final Release Lands October 15

Filed under
KDE

KDE Plasma 5.17 promises some really cool new features and enhancements, among which we can mention multi-screen and HiDPI improvements, fractional scaling on Wayland, support for managing and configuring Thunderbolt hardware in System Settings, Night Color support on X11, and much-improved notifications with automatic Do Not Disturb mode for presentations.

Several of the pages in System Settings got redesigned to help you configure your KDE Plasma system easier, the Breeze GTK theme now offers users a better appearance for the Chromium and Google Chrome web browsers and supports system color schemes for GTK and GNOME apps, System Monitor now shows NVidia GPU stats, and Plasma Discover package manager now shows icons for Snap apps.

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Best Linux distros of 2019: for beginners and advanced users

Filed under
Linux

Linux is traditionally associated as being an operating system for coders and programmers, but over the years there have been real attempts to make Linux more attractive to general consumers. This is not least due to general consumer dissatisfaction with Windows security issues or even Apple's walled garden.

However, Linux comes in many different forms, known as 'flavors' or 'distros'. This is simply because Linux is so incredibly configurable that different forms tend to be developed for different userbase needs or interests.

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BeagleBone AI board ships with EVE machine learning cores

Filed under
Linux
Debian

The open-spec BeagleBone AI has arrived for $118 with a dual Cortex-A15 TI AM5729 with dual C66x DSPs and 4x EVE cores for AI. The SBC supplies 1GB RAM, 16GB eMMC, WiFi/BT, GbE, USB 3.0 Type-C, and micro-HDMI.

The long-awaited heir to the BeagleBone Black that was unveiled by the BeagleBoard.org Foundation in February has reached market. The open-spec, community-backed BeagleBone AI has begun selling with pre-installed Debian Linux for $118 at Newark and $125 at Arrow, Mouser, and OKdo. The layout and dimensions appear to be the same as the 86 x 53mm BeagleBone Black and it supports the same Cape add-on boards.

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Older Broadwell Graphics Performance Is Looking Good With The New Intel Gallium3D OpenGL Linux Driver

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

A majority of our benchmarking of Intel's new Gallium3D OpenGL open-source driver is done with various "Gen9" graphics hardware given its proliferation and not yet having any Icelake Gen11 graphics hardware for Linux benchmarking. But with the Iris Gallium3D going back to supporting Broadwell "Gen8" graphics, here is a fresh look at how that oldest supported Intel hardware is working for this new Linux open-source OpenGL driver compared to the current default "i965" Intel OpenGL driver too.

Last week I provided an extensive look at the current Intel Gallium3D driver performance with the common Gen9 graphics hardware and the performance (and overall stability) of this new driver is looking great. It's looking like Intel is still on track for enabling that driver by default in Mesa before the 19.3 release at the end of the calendar year. Following that testing I was curious about Broadwell so I fired up an old Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon laptop.

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Parrot 4.7 Ethical Hacking OS Released with Linux Kernel 5.2, MATE 1.22 Desktop

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Linux

Coming more than four months after version 4.6, the Parrot 4.7 release is here with up-to-date penetration testing and ethical hacking tools for security researchers and everyone else how wants to get started with security releated tasks. Powered by the Linux 5.2 kernel, Parrot 4.7 introduces a new sandbox behavior to make it easier to use sandboxed apps.

"In Parrot 4.7 the sandbox is disabled by default, and users can decide wether to start an application sandboxed or not," explains Lorenzo Faletra. "You can easily start the sandboxed version of an installed program from the /sandbox/ folder or from a dedicated menu that we plan to improve in the future, or you can re-enable it by default by using the firecfg tool."

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Linux Kernel 5.3 Gets First Point Release, It's Now Ready for Mass Deployments

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Linux

Released by Linus Torvalds on September 15th, Linux kernel 5.3 is the latest and most advanced kernel series for Linux-based operating systems and introduces support for the Intel Speed Select feature to make power tuning much easier on some Xeon servers, as well as support for AMD Radeon Navi GPUs in the AMDGPU driver.

It also adds support for Zhaoxin x86 CPUs, support for utilizing the clamping mechanism in power-asymmetric processors, support for the umwait x86 instructions for more power efficient userspace, support for 16 millions new IPv4 addresses in the 0.0.0.0/8 range, and support for the lightweight and flexible ACRN embedded hypervisor.

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Also: Collabora Adds MPEG-2 Decoding to the Linux 5.3 Kernel, Many Other Changes

Lubuntu, A Once Great Distro, Is Falling Behind

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Ubuntu

Lubuntu used to be that Linux distribution that you referred a friend to in case he wanted a very lightweight, newbie-friendly yet elegant alternative for Windows. Up to its 18.04LTS release, it indeed worked as expected, but starting with 18.10 where the development team switched to using the Qt-based desktop LXQt instead of traditional LXDE, things started to break.

As a short background, you should know that there was a desktop environment called “Razor-Qt”, which was a newly developed desktop based on the Qt toolkit that aimed to be lightweight and modern in the same time. There was also another team working on a Qt branch of LXDE (which is GTK-based) called LXDE-Qt. After a lot of discussions, both teams combined efforts and started to work on one project called LXQt.

LXDE desktop is still working today, and is considered to be feature complete. But it was not even ported to GTK 3 like other desktops such as MATE and XFCE, instead, it’s still using the legacy GTK 2.

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Fedora Workstation 31 – What's new

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Red Hat

Fedora has been leading the migration to Wayland since day one and we are not planning to stop. XWayland on demand has been an effort a lot of people contributed to this cycle. The goal is to only need XWayland for legacy X applications, not have it started and running all the time as that is a waste of system resources and also having core functionality still depend on X under Wayland makes the system more fragile. XWayland-on-demand has been a big effort with contributions from a lot of people and companies. One piece of this was the Systemd user session patches that was originally written by Iain Lane from Canonical. They had been lingering for a bit so Benjamin Berg took those patches on for this cycle and helped shepherd them over the finish line and get them merged upstream. This work wasn’t a hard requirement for Wayland-on-demand, but since it makes it a lot easier to do different things under X and Wayland which in turn makes moving towards XWayland-on-demand a little simpler to implement. That work will also allow (in future releases) us to do things like only start services under GNOME that are actually needed for your hardware, so for instance if you don’t have a bluetooth adapter in your computer there is no reason to run the bits of GNOME dealing with bluetooth. So expect further resource savings coming from this work over time.

Carlos Garnacho then spent time going through GNOME Shell removing any lingering X dependencies while Olivier Fourdan worked on cleaning up the control center. This work has mostly landed, but it is hidden behind an experimental flag (gsettings set org.gnome.mutter experimental-features "[...,'autostart-xwayland']") in Fedora 31 as we need to mature it a bit more before its ready for primetime. But we hope and expect to have it running by default in Fedora Workstation 32.

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Also: Fedora Workstation 31 Should Be Another Fantastic Release For Desktop Linux

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Lima Gallium3D Picks Up A Buffer Object Cache, Partial Updates

    The Lima Gallium3D driver for supporting Arm Mali 400/450 graphics hardware within Arm SoCs has picked up a few performance optimizations.

    Vasily Khoruzhick has contributed a buffer object cache to this Gallium3D driver to avoid the great overhead costs to allocating buffer objects. The BO cache for Lima is modeled after the Broadcom V3D Gallium3D driver's BO cache.

  • Akademy Behind!

    The framework-for-that idea lives on, though: today I was looking for something to extract the Exec= line from a .desktop file, and there’s a framework for that (KIO does the job, but that’s a pretty heavy dependency for what I wanted; I’ll need to think about it some).

    Third year running (Almeria, Vienna, Milan), I presented the BoF wrap-up session at the end of the day – that’s mostly acting as MC to get other people to tell their stories. Here’s thursday and friday for instance, via the dot. Videos are on YouTube.

    For next year, I’d like to train some other people to do the presentation – because there are so many other faces in KDE. I have high hopes for Caio (of KPMCore and other things) and Aish (GCompris) who I’d like to see out there fronting for the KDE community.

    For being a loud person I’ve now been appropriately punished, by being voted on to the board of KDE e.V. (that page needs an update). I’ll be doing generally useful things, I hope, which means massaging the community code of conduct and spending money from our donors on events all over the world where people from all corners of the KDE community can participate.

  • ClonOS 19.09-RELEASE

    FreeBSD 13.0-CURRENT (r352386)
    cloud-init support (see errata)
    fixed fbbuf/vesa video issue with some recent Linux distros ( Kali Linux, Parrot, etc..)
    p9fs support (*)
    CBSD updated to 12.1.1
    fixed known SQL injection vulnerabilities

  • EndeavourOS 2019.09.15 overview | AN ARCH-BASED DISTRO WITH A FRIENDLY COMMUNITY IN ITS CORE

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of EndeavourOS 2019.09.15 and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • Cameron Kaiser: A quick note for 64-bit PowerPC Firefox builders

    If you build Firefox on 64-bit Linux, *BSD, etc. for your G5, you may want to check out this Talospace article for an upcoming low-level fix especially as we need to ensure big-endian systems work fine with it. The problem never affected OS X Firefox for Power Macs because those builds were only ever 32-bit, and even TenFourFox is 32-bit through and through even on the G5 largely for reasons of Carbon compatibility which we need for some pieces of the widget code. Since this is syndicated on Planet Mozilla let me give a big thanks to Ted Campbell for figuring out the root cause, which turned out to be a long-standing problem I don't think anyone ever noticed before.

  • Preventing Lubuntu 18.04 from leaving a user process running after the user logs out
  • List Device Names, Disk and Partition Information in Linux with lsblk

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • HEURISTIC ALGORITHMS FOR THE PROBLEM OF OPTIMIZATION OF THE DRAIN AREA IN UNCONVENTIONAL FIELDS OF HYDROCARBONS

    In a previous work, a linear programming based procedure was presented for this problem, and this procedure allowed to solve real-life instances, albeit -in some cases- producing plans with overlappings among the pads (since a relaxation is solved) and suffering from memory issues.

  • Getting Started With Async Features in Python

    Have you heard of asynchronous programming in Python? Are you curious to know more about Python async features and how you can use them in your work? Perhaps you’ve even tried to write threaded programs and run into some issues. If you’re looking to understand how to use Python async features, then you’ve come to the right place.

  • Anaconda Enterprise Receives Honors in Fourth Annual Datanami Readers’ and Editors’ Choice Awards

    Anaconda’s enterprise data science platform has been recognized in the fourth annual Datanami Readers’ and Editors’ Choice Awards, presented during the Strata Data Conference.

  • Exploratory Data Analysis Made Easy At The Command Line

    There are countless tools and libraries in Python for data scientists to perform powerful analyses, but they often have a setup cost that acts as a barrier to ad-hoc exploration of data. Visidata is a command line application that eliminates the friction involved with starting the discovery process. In this episode Saul Pwanson explains his motivation for creating it, why a terminal environment is a useful place for this work, and how you can use Visidata for your own work. If you have ever avoided looking at a data set because you couldn't be bothered with the boilerplate for a Jupyter notebook, then Visidata is the perfect addition to your toolbox.

    [...]

    There are countless tools and libraries in Python for data scientists to perform powerful analyses, but they often have a setup cost that acts as a barrier to ad-hoc exploration of data. Visidata is a command line application that eliminates the friction involved with starting the discovery process. In this episode Saul Pwanson explains his motivation for creating it, why a terminal environment is a useful place for this work, and how you can use Visidata for your own work. If you have ever avoided looking at a data set because you couldn’t be bothered with the boilerplate for a Jupyter notebook, then Visidata is the perfect addition to your toolbox.

SUSE and Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
SUSE
  • Skuba on SUSE CaaS Platform 4

    With SUSE CaaS Platform 4 we heard our customers feedback and decided to change what the lifecycle of the platform looks like.

    Previous versions of SUSE CaaS Platform included an administrator node that despite being useful for managing the whole platform, was another component to take care of, and an extra machine to take into account when deploying the platform.

    This administrator node used Salt to set up and maintain the Kubernetes cluster among the different nodes comprising your cluster.

    During this time, your feedback has been that a little more flexibility on the deployment was appreciated, so you could experiment with slightly different setups, even if they were for proof of concepts while you were fleshing out the details of production clusters.

  • Kubernetes Rolling Update Strategy in our production infra

    Kubernetes rolling update strategy means suppose we are running pod (containers) in our live infra and we want to update new changes into our running pod like build update, confrontational changes etc. While deployment new pod with new changes suppose our containers got stuck or failed due to any reason.

    So, we have to redeploy old pod with old changes again to avoid downtime of our application. This complete process is called rolling update strategy in Kubernetes.

    Kubernetes rolling update strategy

    Before moving to next we should aware about new pod deployment strategy of Kubernetes means how many new pods it will deploy at a time without taking downtime. Because high availability of our website is our first priority. So, while deploying new pod Kubernetes will deploy 25% or you can say one fourth of the total pod. Suppose we are running four pods first it will terminate 25% of total pod means one pod. Then it will launch 25% new pod and so on.

  • Tackle OpenStack networking woes with SUSE OpenStack Cloud Crowbar

    By far, the most difficult aspect of successfully deploying OpenStack is getting the networking right, a challenge that has caused many a well-intentioned IT team to throw up its hands and toss in the towel. Fortunately, SUSE OpenStack Cloud removes much of that pain by automating most of the network deployment and dramatically simplifying custom network set-ups.

  • Grow your virtualization environments without breaking the bank

    An IT director at a large financial services company shares the benefits and cost reductions they’ve experienced by switching to Red Hat Virtualization. In just three years, it’s paved the way for an efficient, stable and cost-effective virtualization environment.

  • How to Handle OpenShift Worker Nodes Resources in Overcommitted State

    One of the benefits in adopting a system like OpenShift is facilitating burstable and scalable workload. Horizontal application scaling involves adding or removing instances of an application to match demand. When OpenShift schedules a Pod, it’s important that the nodes have enough resources to actually run it. If a user schedules a large application (in the form of Pod) on a node with limited resources , it is possible for the node to run out of memory or CPU resources and for things to stop working!

    It’s also possible for applications to take up more resources than they should. This could be caused by a team spinning up more replicas than they need to artificially decrease latency or simply because of a configuration change that causes a program to go out of control and try to use 100% of the available CPU resources. Regardless of whether the issue is caused by a bad developer, bad code, or bad luck, what’s important is how a cluster administrator can manage and maintain control of the resources.

    In this blog, let’s take a look at how you can solve these problems using best practices.

  • How the new Quarkus extension for Visual Studio Code improves the development experience

    Earlier this year, we were introduced to Quarkus, the next-generation, container-first framework for Java applications. As expected, such new frameworks and technologies make way for new developer tools focused on making the development experience even better.

    The recent Quarkus extension for Visual Studio Code release aims to do just that, by bringing features specific to Quarkus project development within VS Code. The new VS Code extension is dependent on a couple of Java extensions for VS Code, so it is recommended that you have the Java Extension Pack installed. This article outlines what the Quarkus extension for VS Code has to offer: convenient features for an already convenient Java framework.

Security: New Updates and "Optimizing KVM Virtualization Performance Stemming From Spectre"

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (expat, php-pecl-http, and php7.0), Fedora (ImageMagick, jackson-annotations, jackson-bom, jackson-core, jackson-databind, and rubygem-rmagick), Mageia (chromium-browser-stable, ibus, kernel, samba, and thunderbird), openSUSE (chromium), Oracle (dovecot and kernel), Red Hat (dbus, kernel, kernel-alt, and kpatch-patch), Scientific Linux (dovecot and kernel), and SUSE (expat, ibus, kernel, kernel-source-rt, nmap, openssl, and webkit2gtk3).

  • Red Hat Working On Optimizing KVM Virtualization Performance Stemming From Spectre

    Red Hat's Andrea Arcangeli sent out an interesting patch series on Friday to micro-optimize the Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) to enhance the VMEXIT performance in wake of Spectre mitigations.

    The "KVM monolithic" patch series ends up linking the KVM common code both into kvm-intel and kvm-amd so that the common "kvm" kernel module can be dropped. This occupies more disk space but should yield better run-time performance particularly for systems mitigated against Spectre Variant Two.

  • 10 Best Anonymous Browser Apps for Android to Stay Incognito

    Android isn’t the most secure platform out there, but with the 10 best apps for anonymous browsing, you can greatly enhance your privacy online. Today we’ll define what anonymous browsing actually entails, run through 10 essential Android apps, and present the 2 best Android VPNs for the ultimate mobile cybersecurity.

Kernel: AMD Navi 10 Firmware and Linux 5.4 Additions

Filed under
Linux
  • AMD Navi 10 Firmware Finally Lands In The Linux-Firmware Tree

    While AMD has provided open-source Radeon RX 5700 series (Navi 10) support since launch and that code since worked into the various mainline code-bases from the Linux kernel to Mesa, one kink in their support has been their binary microcode images not being available from the reference linux-firmware.git location as needed to initialize the hardware. That Navi 10 firmware/microcode issue has finally been rectified with the images landing this morning.

    Up until now any Radeon RX 5700 series Linux customers or distribution/third-party driver packagers have had to pull these binary bits from this Navi10 directory on the personal site of AMDGPU lead maintainer Alex Deucher. Via his site is where he normally stages these binary microcode files until landing in linux-firmware.git as the de facto location for all Linux drivers' firmware files.

  • Linux 5.4 Brings Support For Wacom's MobileStudio Pro 13, Logitech Lightspeed Receivers

    Jiri Kosina on Sunday sent out the HID subsystem updates for the in-development Linux 5.4 kernel. The HID pull once again features support for several new devices particularly on the Logitech side.

  • Wireless USB + UWB Demotion Goes Ahead For Linux 5.4

    Back in August I noted that Wireless USB and Ultra Wideband would be deprecated within the Linux kernel and that is indeed happening for Linux 5.4.

    The Wireless USB (WUSB) and Ultra Wideband (UWB) subsystems within the Linux kernel were already orphaned for years with having no maintainer while now they are officially deprecated and demoted to the kernel's staging area. If no one steps up soon to maintain the code, it will be dropped in forthcoming kernel releases.

Videos from LibreOffice Conference 2019: OpenDocument Format

Filed under
LibO
Movies
OSS
OOo

LibreOffice can open documents in many formats, including Microsoft Office files (.docx, .xlxs, .pptx). But it’s native file format is the fully open and standardised OpenDocument Format (ODF). At the recent LibreOffice Conference 2019 in Spain, community members gave presentations about news and updates for ODF. So, here are the first videos from the presentations (use headphones for best audio quality).

Read more

Events: GUADEC 2019 on Flatpak, Nuremberg Sprint 2019, Texas Cyber Summit and GStreamer Conference 2019

Filed under
OSS
  • Will Thompson: Flatpak External Data Checker

    (This post is a slightly longer version of a lightning talk I gave at GUADEC 2019.)

    Many non-free applications’ binaries cannot be redistributed (particularly not in modified form), so they cannot be included directly in a Flatpak. To work around this, Flatpak supports the concept of “extra data”: files which will be downloaded and unpacked from a third-party URI when the app is installed. The URI is accompanied by a checksum and a size, to provide some hope that the data unpacked on the user’s system is the same as what the packager tested. This is used by, for example, the Dropbox Flatpak.

    Of course, the Flatpak needs to be kept up to date when new versions of the app are released. At best, the old URL will still point to the same file, so at least the old version of the app will continue to be installed; in some cases, however, vendors publish new versions of the app at the same URL, which means the Flatpak cannot be installed until it is updated.

  • When I couldn’t make it to Nuremberg Sprint 2019

    Back when I was selected as a Google Summer of Code 2019 student for my project Porting KDE Connect to Windows, it was a sheer stroke of luck when incidentally I got invited by my mentor Simon Redman, to come to the Nuremberg Mega sprint for hacking on KDE Connect with the team!

    It was an awesome opportunity, but to be able to get to the sprint, I had to travel abroad, which needs the most difficult document I had to procure till date- a Schengen VISA. There are multiple kinds of VISA- short term, long term, and some schengen states have more or less categories of short term Visa that you can apply through. You can read more about schengen VISAs here.

  • Texas Cyber Summit | Jupiter Extras 16

    Ell, Wes, and The Blind Hacker discuss Texas Cyber Summit, Ell's birthday dinner, and the "Bee New" conference track.

  • Ole Aamot: GStreamer Conference 2019

    On September 10, 2019 I released GNOME Radio (gnome-radio) version 0.2.0 and I released GNOME Internet Radio Locator (gnome-internet-radio-locator) version 2.0.6 with support for Middle East Broadcasting Center in Dubai, Saudi Arabia on September 22, 2019.

    On October 29, 2019 I am going via Paris on Air France to the GStreamer Conference 2019 held between October 30, 2019 and November 1, 2019 in Lyon, France to give a 5-minute lightening talk on GNOME Radio as part of my Bachelor thesis in Electrical Engineering at Oslo Metropolitan University in Oslo, Norway with the earliest delivery on June 30, 2020.

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today's howtos

HAT offers hardware watchdog for Raspberry Pi

On Kickstarter: Sequent Microsystems has launched a $15 “Hardware Watchdog HAT & Power Manager for Raspberry Pi” for protecting against software lock-ups. Hardware-based watchdog timers are usually standard equipment on industrial computers, but are rarely seen on Linux hacker boards. Sequent Microsystems, which has previously launched Raspberry Pi add-ons such as the MegaIO-IND home automation board, has now successfully launched a Hardware Watchdog HAT & Power Manager for Raspberry Pi. The HAT is available on Kickstarter through Oct. 17 for $15 for Jan. 2020 delivery or $20 for Nov. 2019 delivery. Read more

KDE Plasma 5.17 Desktop Environment Enters Beta, Final Release Lands October 15

KDE Plasma 5.17 promises some really cool new features and enhancements, among which we can mention multi-screen and HiDPI improvements, fractional scaling on Wayland, support for managing and configuring Thunderbolt hardware in System Settings, Night Color support on X11, and much-improved notifications with automatic Do Not Disturb mode for presentations. Several of the pages in System Settings got redesigned to help you configure your KDE Plasma system easier, the Breeze GTK theme now offers users a better appearance for the Chromium and Google Chrome web browsers and supports system color schemes for GTK and GNOME apps, System Monitor now shows NVidia GPU stats, and Plasma Discover package manager now shows icons for Snap apps. Read more

Best Linux distros of 2019: for beginners and advanced users

Linux is traditionally associated as being an operating system for coders and programmers, but over the years there have been real attempts to make Linux more attractive to general consumers. This is not least due to general consumer dissatisfaction with Windows security issues or even Apple's walled garden. However, Linux comes in many different forms, known as 'flavors' or 'distros'. This is simply because Linux is so incredibly configurable that different forms tend to be developed for different userbase needs or interests. Read more