Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Sunday, 18 Aug 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Intel Tries Again To Auto Enable GuC/HuC Functionality For Their Linux Graphics Driver

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Intel previously tried auto-enabling GuC and HuC functionality within their Linux kernel graphics driver but ended up reverting the support since the driver didn't gracefully handle the scenarios of missing/corrupt firmware files. The driver should now be more robust in such situations so they will try again for turning on the automatic behavior, possibly for the upcoming Linux 5.4 cycle.

Intel GuC and HuC have been around since Skylake and used for graphics workload scheduling, some power management bits, and for select media capabilities. For newer hardware is also being used as part of HEVC/H.265 handling.

Read more

KDE Frameworks 5.61, Applications 19.08 in FreeBSD

Filed under
KDE
BSD

Recent releases were KDE Frameworks 5.61 and KDE Applications 19.08. These have both landed in the official FreeBSD ports tree, after Tobias did most of the work and I pushed the big red button.

Your FreeBSD machine will need to be following current ports – not the quarterly release branches, since we don’t backport to those.

All the modern bits have arrived, maintaining the KDE-FreeBSD team’s commitment to up-to-date software for the FreeBSD desktop. The one thing we’re currently lagging on is Qt 5.13. There’s a FreeBSD problem report tracking that update.

Read more

Dev branch moving towards Qt 6

Filed under
Development
KDE

As you know, Qt 5.14 will be branched pretty soon. After that I would expect that most new development work would start to be aimed towards Qt 6. As it looks right now, 5.15 will be a smaller release where we polish what we have in 5.14, and prepare some things for Qt 6.

To reflect that and help us all understand that the development focus is now towards Qt 6, I would like to propose that dev becomes the Qt 6 branch after we branched away 5.14 (and we merge wip/qt6 back into dev). We can then either create a 5.15 branch at the same time, or slightly later, once 5.14 has stabilised a bit more (e.g. after the beta or RC).

Read more

Also: Qt's Development Branch To Begin Forming Qt 6

How to Check Which Debian Version are you Running

Filed under
HowTos

Wondering which Debian version are you running? This tutorial teaches you several ways to check Debian version in the terminal.
Read more

Tilda: A Great Dropdown Terminal

Filed under
Development
OSS

If you need a full sized, full featured persistent terminal that appears and hides at a single keystroke, Tilda is your friend. Like most Free Software, it has too little documentation, and some conflicting documentation out on the web. That's OK, with this document make Tilda do a heck of a lot of what it was designed to do. This document didn't cover multiple Tilda instance or transparency, but I'm sure both will be easy for you to achieve with a little web search and experimentation.

Read more

I'm going to work full time on free software

Filed under
Development
OSS

A lot has changed since then. For one thing, I’ve learned the importance of free software in contrast to the “open source” I spoke of at the time. And, as I predicted, my eventual path toward achieving this goal was something I couldn’t imagine at the time.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Going Linux #375 · Listener Feedback

    In this episode, we have several questions about accessibility in Linux applications, we discuss a couple of cross-platform office suites that provide a bit better compatibility with Microsoft Office file formats, and we discuss problems and solutions for Ubuntu, Barrier, video and privacy and security. Lastly, we comment on Linux Journal's goodbye.

  • Install Java on Debian 9 Operating System
  • List of Inactive/Discontinued Linux Distributions

    This page provides information about the distributions that are no longer supported or developed starting from 2019 with details.

    This table contains the Linux Distribution Name, Distribution Initial Release Date, Distribution Latest Release Date, Reason for distribution inactive, and Distribution Age.

Events: LibreOffice Conference 2020, MariaDB's Thomas Boyd and Upcoming Linux Foundation’s Open Source Summit

Filed under
OSS
  • LibreOffice Conference 2020 Proposals

    The Document Foundation has received two different proposals for the organization of LibOCon 2020 from the Turkish and German communities. When this has happened in the past, in 2012 (Berlin vs Zaragoza) and 2013 (Milan vs Montreal), TDF Members have been asked to decide by casting their vote.

    This document provides an outline of the two proposals, which are attached in their original format.

  • Thomas Boyd Discusses Which Open Source Database is the Best Fit for the Business

    The world's largest and most innovative businesses are turning to enterprise open source databases for mission-critical applications, with the most popular open source relational databases being MariaDB, MySQL, and Postgres.

    However, while all three of these databases are open source, mature, and available in enterprise editions, there are significant differences between them — both in terms of application development as well as database administration and operations.

    DBTA recently held a webinar featuring Thomas Boyd, director of technical marketing, MariaDB Corporation, who discussed the differences between MariaDB, MySQL, and Postgres.

    [...]

    EnterpriseDB is heap only while MySQL and MariaDB offer InnoDB, Columnar, Aria, MyRocks, and more.

  • Open Source Summit welcomes Platform9 experts

    Cloud-native experts share tips and practical learnings for Kubernetes in the enterprise, Kubernetes on bare metal or with stateful MySQL databases, and optimizing the cost and performance of Serverless applications.

  • Transform Your Career: Attend Open Source Summit North America this August in San Diego

    For the last decade, The Linux Foundation’s Open Source Summit has proven to be invaluable for attendees.  A 2018 participant recently wrote an article on OpenSource.com stating “Last August, I arrived at the Vancouver Convention Centre to give a lightning talk and speak on a panel at Open Source Summit North America 2018. It’s no exaggeration to say that this conference—and applying to speak at it—transformed my career.” We encourage you to read the article and discover why attending Open Source Summit can be a game changer for you as well.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Intervalometerator: Open Source Code for a Remote Timelapse DSLR

    Want to set up a remote DSLR for shooting a time-lapse? The Intervalometerator (AKA ‘intvlm8r’) is an open-source intervalometer that can help you do so at minimal hardware cost (as long as you’re comfortable tinkering with hardware and software).

    Created by Sydney-based coder Greig Sheridan and his photographer partner Rocky over the course of a year, the Intervalometerator is designed to be both cheap and easy to build with familiar tools and using Raspberry Pi and Arduino microcontrollers.

    “My partner and I have been working for over twelve months now on an intervalometer in order to shoot a DSLR-based time-lapse of the construction of our friends’ home in NZ,” Sheridan tells PetaPixel. “It was at the time a seemingly clever idea for a house-warming present, but it grew like tribbles to consume an incredible amount of effort).

  • Open Source Tools & Framework: Microservices Perspective
  • Open Source flexiWAN SD-WAN Software Beta Ships
  • Agile and open source can complement each other

    Despite the growing popularity of both Agile development and open-source practices, it’s not often that they come up in the same conversation. When these two concepts do intersect, it’s often to highlight the contradicting viewpoints that these two models supposedly represent.

    While there are core differences, Agile doesn’t have to be the enemy of open source—in fact, I would argue the opposite.

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Twilio CLI

    In an effort to help its developers be more productive, Twilio has announced the beta version of Twilio CLI. It is an open-source command line interface that enables developers to access Twilio through their command prompt.

    “It’s hard to beat the flexibility and power that a CLI provides at development time. Until now, there was no CLI designed for typical communications requirements,” Ashley Roach, the product manager for developer interfaces at Twilio, wrote in a post.

  • Using open source in your enterprise? What to look out for

    According to Statista, the open source market was valued at $11.4 billion in 2017 and is estimated to grow to $32.95 billion by 2022, showing it has no intention of slowing down anytime soon.

    Founded on the belief that collaboration and cooperation build better software, open source sounds closer to a utopian dream than to the cold digital world of programming. Research showed that open source code takes over proprietary one in applications at 57%. This has numerous benefits, such as speeding up the software development process or creating more effective and innovative software.

    For example, open source frontend development frameworks, such as Angular, are often found in custom web apps, which allows companies to get their products to market at ever-increasing rates. In addition, companies tend to engage open source when at the cusp of technological innovation, especially when it comes to AR, blockchain, IoT, and AI.

  • Open Source Technology: What's It All About?

    To understand how open source works, it is important to appreciate where it all began. The very idea behind its inception isn’t exactly a new one. It’s been adopted by scientists for decades. Let’s imagine a scientist working on a project to develop a cure for an illness. If this scientist only published the results and kept the methods a secret, this would undoubtedly inhibit scientific discovery and further research in this area. On the other hand, teaming up with other researchers and making results and methodologies visible allows for greater and faster innovation.

    This is the premise from which open source was originally born. Open source refers to software that has an open source code so it can be viewed, modified for a particular need, and importantly, shared (under license). One of the first well known open source initiatives was developed in 1998 by Netscape, which released its Navigator browser as free software and demonstrated the benefits of taking an open source approach. Since then, there have been a number of pivotal moments in open source history that have shaped the technology industry as we know it today. Nowadays, some of the latest technology you use on a daily basis, like your smartphone or laptop, will have been built using open source software.

    [...]

    Recent research found that 60 percent of organizations are already using open source software. Many businesses are realizing the benefits that the technology can bring in relation to driving innovation and reducing costs. This in turn is seeing a growing number of organizations integrate open source into their IT operations or even building entire businesses around it. With emerging technologies such as cloud, AI and machine learning only driving this adoption further, open source will continue to play a central and growing role throughout the technology landscape.

  • How to Take Your Open Source Project from Good to Great

    Whether or not you expect anyone to contribute to your project, you should be prepared for the possibility of others wanting to help your cause. And when that happens, your contributing guide will show those helpers exactly how they can get involved. This guide, usually in the form of a CONTRIBUTING.md file, should include information on how one should submit a pull request or open an issue for your project and what kinds of help you’re looking for (bug fixes, design direction, feature requests, etc.).

  • ForgeRock Delivers Open Source IoT Edge Controller for Device Identity

    According to a recent announcement, ForgeRock, a platform provider of digital identity management solutions, has launched its IoT Edge Controller, which is designed to provide consumer and industrial manufacturers the ability to deliver trusted identity at the device level.

  • Browser Settings Too Complex? Let Firefox Handle That for You

    Firefox SVP David Camp doesn't want internet users wasting time 'understanding how the internet is watching you.'

  • Exclusive: Automattic CEO Matt Mullenweg on what’s next for Tumblr

    It’s been a long and winding road for Tumblr, the blogging site that launched a thousand writing careers. It sold to Yahoo for $1.1 billion in 2013, then withered as Yahoo sold itself to AOL, AOL sold itself to Verizon, and Verizon realized it was a phone company after all. Through all that, the site’s fierce community hung on: it’s still Taylor Swift’s go-to social media platform, and fandoms of all kinds have homes there.

    Verizon sold Tumblr for a reported $3 million this week, a far cry from the billion-dollar valuation it once had. But to Verizon’s credit, it chose to sell Tumblr to Automattic, the company behind WordPress, the publishing platform that runs some 34 percent of the world’s websites. Automattic CEO Matt Mullenweg thinks the future of Tumblr is bright. He wants the platform to bring back the best of old-school blogging, reinvented for mobile and connected to Tumblr’s still-vibrant community, and he’s retaining all 200 Tumblr employees to build that future. It’s the most exciting vision for Tumblr in years.

    Matt joined Verge reporter Julia Alexander and me on a special Vergecast interview episode to chat about the deal, how it came together, what Automattic’s plans for Tumblr look like, and whether Tumblr might become an open-source project, like WordPress itself. (“That would be pretty cool,” said Matt.)

    Oh, and that porn ban.

Apache: Self Assessment and Security

Filed under
Server
OSS
  • The Apache® Software Foundation Announces Annual Report for 2019 Fiscal Year

    The Apache® Software Foundation (ASF), the all-volunteer developers, stewards, and incubators of more than 350 Open Source projects and initiatives, announced today the availability of the annual report for its 2019 fiscal year, which ended 30 April 2019.

  • Open Source at the ASF: A Year in Numbers

    332 active projects, 71 million lines of code changed, 7,000+ committers…

    The Apache Software Foundation has published its annual report for fiscal 2019. The hub of a sprawling, influential open source community, the ASF remains in rude good health, despite challenges this year including the need for “an outsized amount of effort” dealing with trademark infringements, and “some in the tech industry trying to exploit the goodwill earned by the larger Open Source community.”

    [...]

    The ASF names 10 “platinum” sponsors: AWS, Cloudera, Comcast, Facebook, Google, LeaseWeb, Microsoft, the Pineapple Fund, Tencent Cloud, and Verizon Media

  • Apache Software Foundation Is Worth $20 Billion

    Yes, Apache is worth $20 billion by its own valuation of the software it offers for free. But what price can you realistically put on open source code?

    If you only know the name Apache in connection with the web server then you are missing out on some interesting software. The Apache Software Foundation ASF, grew out of the Apache HTTP Server project in 1999 with the aim of furthering open source software. It provides a licence, the Apache licence, a decentralized governance and requires projects to be licensed to the ASF so that it can protect the intellectual property rights.

  • Apache Security Advisories Red Flag Wrong Versions in Patching Gaffe

    Researchers have pinpointed errors in two dozen Apache Struts security advisories, which warn users of vulnerabilities in the popular open-source web app development framework. They say that the security advisories listed incorrect versions impacted by the vulnerabilities.

    The concern from this research is that security administrators in companies using the actual impacted versions would incorrectly think that their versions weren’t affected – and would thus refrain from applying patches, said researchers with Synopsys who made the discovery, Thursday.

    “The real question here from this research is whether there remain unpatched versions of the newly disclosed versions in production scenarios,” Tim Mackey, principal security strategist for the Cybersecurity Research Center at Synopsys, told Threatpost. “In all cases, the Struts community had already issued patches for the vulnerabilities so the patches exist, it’s just a question of applying them.”

Google and Android Code

Filed under
Android
Google
OSS
  • Google releases source code for I/O 2019 app with Android Q gesture nav, dark theme

    The Google I/O companion app for Android often takes advantage of the latest design stylings and OS features. It demoed Android Q’s gesture navigation and dark theme this year, with the company today releasing the I/O 2019 source code.

  • Introducing Coil, an open-source Android image loading library backed by Kotlin Coroutines

    Yesterday, Colin White, a Senior Android Engineer at Instacart, introduced Coroutine Image Loader (Coil). It is a fast, lightweight, and modern image loading library for Android backed by Kotlin.

  • Google open-sources Live Transcribe’s speech engine

    Google today open-sourced the speech engine that powers its Android speech recognition transcription tool Live Transcribe. The company hopes doing so will let any developer deliver captions for long-form conversations. The source code is available now on GitHub.

    Google released Live Transcribe in February. The tool uses machine learning algorithms to turn audio into real-time captions. Unlike Android’s upcoming Live Caption feature, Live Transcribe is a full-screen experience, uses your smartphone’s microphone (or an external microphone), and relies on the Google Cloud Speech API. Live Transcribe can caption real-time spoken words in over 70 languages and dialects. You can also type back into it — Live Transcribe is really a communication tool. The other main difference: Live Transcribe is available on 1.8 billion Android devices. (When Live Caption arrives later this year, it will only work on select Android Q devices.)

FOSS in Crypto: Bots, Audius, and "Crypto Code Commits Remain Near All-Time Highs"

Filed under
OSS
  • Best Free and Open-Source Crypto Trading Bots, Rated and Reviewed

    Crypto trading bots have become an increasingly popular tool for experienced bitcoin traders who want to deploy automated bitcoin trading strategies. As a result, there are now over a dozen trading bots (with ranging subscription prices) that digital currency traders can use.

    Fortunately, for traders who want to test out algorithmic trading before committing funds toward a specific bot, there are several free trading bots from which to choose. Here’s an introduction to the most popular free, open-source bitcoin trading bots available in 2019.

  • Blockchain Music Streaming Startup Unveils Source Code, Incentives

    Audius, a blockchain startup that aims to disrupt the music streaming industry, has uploaded its public beta version.

  • Blockchain music-streaming service Audius gears up for public beta

    A new streaming service with its sights set on making the middlemen of the music biz obsolete is inching closer toward its goal of disrupting the Spotifys and SoundClouds of the world.

    After a year of development, and armed with $5 million in investment capital from VC firms General Catalyst, Lightspeed, and Pantera Capital, blockchain startup Audius is finally ready to show the world what it's been working on.

  • Crypto Code Commits Remain Near All-Time Highs, Despite Price Declines

    The least committed contributors were the first to leave as cryptocurrency market caps went south.

    That’s the main finding from Electric Capital’s second “Developer Report,” which was published Monday. The report analyzes code activity in all the open-source repositories in crypto and follows the venture capital firm’s first such report from March.

    While there’s a sense that protocols and projects have been losing code contributors, the majority of developers that left crypto during the market correction in the first half of 2019 (77 percent of them) were the least committed contributors to the least promising projects.

Sharing/Collaboration/Open Data/Open Access

Filed under
OSS
  • 3D printing organs may soon be a reality via a new open-source technique – Future Blink

    Bioengineers at Rice University created entangled cardiovascular networks similar to the body's natural passageways.

  • Global reinsurance experts urge investment in open-source risk models

    Strategic management experts say greater collaboration between the insurance industry and state policy makers, including investment in open-source risk models, could improve society's ability to recover from disasters linked to climate change.

  • Flume Kicks Off Open Source FlumeSounds Project

    Australian #1 bad boy of EDM Flume made a surprise project announcement FlumeSounds yesterday. He uploaded a near 8-minute video of samples to all his socials for fans and creators to manipulate.

  • Flume announces open-source sample series for producers

    Hot off the release of his new EP, 'Quits', Australian producer Flume has revealed Flume Sounds, an open-source audio loop series for producers.

  • First global open-source database for spinal cord injury research will be a ‘game-changer,’ say experts

    Experts from the University of Alberta and two universities of California are teaming up to launch the world’s first open-source database for spinal cord injury research.

    The Open Data Commons for preclinical Spinal Cord Injury research (ODC-SCI) will improve research and treatment worldwide by making data more accessible, according to researchers and patients.

    “The database has the potential to improve treatment for up to half a million people suffering from spinal cord injuries worldwide, and also enhance research in other areas of health, science and rehabilitation,” said Randy Goebel, associate vice-president of research at the U of A.

  • Nationwide project provides free science materials to meet California’s new standards

    While California students began taking a new statewide science test this past spring, school districts were still struggling to get teaching materials aligned to the state’s new science standards into classrooms.

    A new nationwide effort is trying to speed up that process by offering free, open source science materials to teachers and schools.

    In 2017, philanthropists, state leaders and curriculum writers formed OpenSciEd to get materials to teachers implementing the Next Generation Science Standards, new academic standards that emphasize hands-on projects and integrate several scientific disciplines.

    California adopted the new standards in 2013 and this past spring began administering a new state science test. But it wasn’t until last November that the State Board of Education approved a list of recommended textbooks and materials aligned to the new standards for kindergarten through 8th grade.

Security: Defcon, Carbon Black, Open-Source Cyber Fusion Centre, Open Source Security Podcast and Avaya

Filed under
Security
  • DARPA's $10 million voting machine couldn't be hacked at Defcon (for the wrong reasons)

    For the majority of Defcon, hackers couldn't crack the $10 million secure voting machine prototypes that DARPA had set up at the Voting Village. But it wasn't because of the machine's security features that the team had been working on for four months. The reason: technical difficulties during the machines' setup.

    Eager hackers couldn't find vulnerabilities in the DARPA-funded project during the security conference in Las Vegas because a bug in the machines didn't allow hackers to access their systems over the first two days. (DARPA is the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.) Galois brought five machines, and each one had difficulties during the setup, said Joe Kiniry, a principal research scientist at the government contractor.

    "They seemed to have had a myriad of different kinds of problems," the Voting Village's co-founder Harri Hursti said. "Unfortunately, when you're pushing the envelope on technology, these kinds of things happen."

    It wasn't until the Voting Village opened on Sunday morning that hackers could finally get a chance to look for vulnerabilities on the machine. Kiniry said his team was able to solve the problem on three of them and was working to fix the last two before Defcon ended.

  • At hacking conference, Pentagon's transparency highlights voting companies' secrecy

    At the country's biggest election security bonanza, the US government is happy to let hackers try to break into its equipment. The private companies that make the machines America votes on, not so much.

    The Def Con Voting Village, a now-annual event at the US's largest hacking conference, gives hackers free rein to try to break into a wide variety of decommissioned election equipment, some of which is still in use today. As in the previous two years, they found a host of new flaws.
    The hunt for vulnerabilities in US election systems has underscored tensions between the Voting Village organizers, who argue that it's a valuable exercise, and the manufacturers of voting equipment, who didn't have a formal presence at the convention.

  • Carbon Black Open-Source Binary Emulator Eases Malware Analysis

    Carbon Black, the cybersecurity and endpoint protection software provider, has unveiled the Binee open-source binary emulator for real-time malware analysis. The company announced Binee at last week’s DEF CON 27 hacker conference in Las Vegas, Nevada.

    [...]

    Carbon Black also has been gaining momentum with MSPs and MSSPs over the past few months. In fact, Carbon Black recorded revenue of $60.9 million and a net loss of $14.6 million in the second quarter of 2019; both of these figures generally beat Wall Street’s expectations.

  • Concordia receives $560K for a new Open-Source Cyber Fusion Centre

    The call for collaborative projects in the area of information communication technologies led to the genesis of the Open-Source Cyber Fusion Centre, a project that will provide companies with a wide array of tools and methodologies for cybersecurity.

    The project is a joint initiative with Carleton University and two industrial partners, eGloo and AvanTech, all of which have recognized expertise in open-source software application programming interfaces (APIs) and technology stacks.

    [...]

    The Open-Source Cyber Fusion Centre’s ongoing research will help strengthen and democratize the Canadian economy. By mitigating cyberthreats, projects of this kind promote entrepreneurship and help nurture a more diverse economy.

    In addition, the centre provides students with unique opportunities to participate in an ever-changing, complex cybersecurity industry that is becoming increasingly prevalent in Canada.

    SMEs can get in touch with the centre and its partners to receive support on their security operations. They can install advanced technologies in their corporate network as a free service to monitor the security of their operations.

  • Open Source Security Podcast Ep. 151– The DARPA Cyber Grand Challenge with David Brumley

    Open Source Security Podcast helps listeners better understand security topics of the day. Hosted by Kurt Seifried and Josh Bressers, the pair covers a wide range of topics including IoT, application security, operational security, cloud, devops, and security news of the day.

  • McAfee Discovers Vulnerability in Avaya VoIP Phones

    McAfee researchers have uncovered a remote code execution (RCE) vulnerability in open-source software from a popular line of Avaya VoIP phones.

    McAfee is warning organizations that use Avaya VoIP phones to check that firmware on the devices have been updated. Avaya’s install base covers 90% of the Fortune 100, with products targeting customers from small business and midmarket, to large corporations.

KDE: Usability & Productivity, CryFS/Plasma Vault, Krita 4.2.5

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE Usability & Productivity: Week 84

    Get ready for week 84 in KDE’s Usability & Productivity initiative! 84 weeks is a lot of weeks, and in fact the end is in sight for the U&P initiative. I’d say it’s been a huge success, but all good things must come to an end to make room for new growth! In fact, KDE community members have submitted many new goals, which the community will be able to vote on soon, with the three winners being unveiled at Akademy next month.

    But fear not, for the spirit of the Usability & Productivity initiative has suffused the KDE community, and I expect a lot of really cool U&P related stuff to happen even after the initiative has formally ended–including the long-awaited projects of PolicyKit support and mounted Samba and NFS shares in KIO and Dolphin! These projects are making steady progress and I hope to have them done in the next few months, plugging some longstanding holes in our software.

  • ownCloud and CryFS

    It is a great idea to encrypt files on client side before uploading them to an ownCloud server if that one is not running in controlled environment, or if one just wants to act defensive and minimize risk.

    Some people think it is a great idea to include the functionality in the sync client.

    I don’t agree because it combines two very complex topics into one code base and makes the code difficult to maintain. The risk is high to end up with a kind of code base which nobody is able to maintain properly any more. So let’s better avoid that for ownCloud and look for alternatives.

    A good way is to use a so called encrypted overlay filesystem and let ownCloud sync the encrypted files. The downside is that you can not use the encrypted files in the web interface because it can not decrypt the files easily. To me, that is not overly important because I want to sync files between different clients, which probably is the most common usecase.

    [...]

    My personal conclusion: CryFS is an interesting project. It has a nice integration in the KDE desktop with Plasma Vault. Splitting files into equal sized blocks is good because it does not allow to guess data based on names and sizes. However, for syncing with ownCloud, it is not the best partner.

  • Krita 4.2.5 Digital Painting Software for Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    Krita is a robust, fast and flexible painting application that makes creating art from scratch or existing resources a fun and productive experience. With many powerful brush engines and unique features such as multi­hand and mirrored painting, Krita explicitly supports creating comics, concept art, storyboards, textures, matte paintings and illustrations.

    Krita has several features that are unique or a first among free software painting applications: support for colorspaces other than RGB, like CMYK, support for HDR painting, painting assistants, a perspective grid.
    Pop-up Palette: Quickly pick your color and brush by right-clicking on the canvas. You can also use Krita’s tagging system to swap out the available brushes that are displayed. The ring outside of the color selector contains the most recently used colors. These settings can be configured through the preferences.

HealthyPi v4 open source, wireless, wearable for human vital signs monitoring

Filed under
Hardware

A new piece of hardware will soon be launching via the Crowd Supply website called HealthyPi v4, offering a fourth-generation built on the technology and feedback from previous versions. The open source, wireless, wearable has been specifically designed to monitor human vital signs and is powered by an ESP32.

Read more

Also: EEZ Bench Box 3 open source modular test chassis

Open Hardware and Devices

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • RAKWireless Introduces RAK7200 LoRa Tracker | Features & Specifications
  • Padauk PMS150C “3 Cents” MCU Supports SDCC Open Source Toolchain
  • OpenHW Group Launched
  • Spain's First Open Source Satellite

    [Fossa Systems], a non-profit youth association based out of Madrid, is developing an open-source satellite set to launch in October 2019. The FossaSat-1 is sized at 5x5x5 cm, weighs 250g, and will provide free IoT connectivity by communicating LoRa RTTY signals through low-power RF-based LoRa modules. The satellite is powered by 28% efficient gallium arsenide TrisolX triple junction solar cells.

    The satellite’s development and launch cost under EUR 30000, which is pretty remarkable for a cubesat — or a picosatellite, as the project is being dubbed. It has been working in the UHF Amateur Satellite band (435-438 MHz) and recently received an IARU frequency spectrum allocation for LoRa of 125kHz.

  • Fitness Trackers Don't Have To Be Proprietary

    The OpenHAK is an open-source fitness tracker in a 3D printed wristwatch case that measures your heart rate and counts your steps, offering the resultant data for you to collect via Bluetooth. At its heart is a Sparkfun Simblee module, with heart rate sensing through a Maxim MAX30101 and step counting .by a Bocsh BMI160. It’s designed for expandability from the start with a header bringing out useful interface lines. In the prototype, they’ve used this to support a small OLED display. The result is a fitness tracker watch that may not match some of the well-known proprietary devices, but which remains completely open and probably costs a lot less too.

  • CutiePi is an open source Raspberry Pi-based tablet (coming in late 2019?)

    The CutiePi is hardly the first tablet built around one of Raspberry Pi’s tiny, low-cost computers. But it’s a pretty nifty looking addition to the category that combines an 8 inch touchscreen display with a Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 Lite, a custom carrier board, and software to make the Linux-based Raspbian operating system touch-friendly.

    CutiePie’s developers have a working prototype and hope to begin selling the tablet later this year. But the whole project is open source, so anyone who wants to build their own can check out the code and hardware design files and give it a try.

  • CutiePi open source Raspberry Pi tablet unveiled

    Unfortunately, no information on pricing or worldwide availability has been released as yet for the CutiePi, but as soon as information comes to light, we will keep you updated as always.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

KDE Frameworks 5.61, Applications 19.08 in FreeBSD

Recent releases were KDE Frameworks 5.61 and KDE Applications 19.08. These have both landed in the official FreeBSD ports tree, after Tobias did most of the work and I pushed the big red button. Your FreeBSD machine will need to be following current ports – not the quarterly release branches, since we don’t backport to those. All the modern bits have arrived, maintaining the KDE-FreeBSD team’s commitment to up-to-date software for the FreeBSD desktop. The one thing we’re currently lagging on is Qt 5.13. There’s a FreeBSD problem report tracking that update. Read more

Dev branch moving towards Qt 6

As you know, Qt 5.14 will be branched pretty soon. After that I would expect that most new development work would start to be aimed towards Qt 6. As it looks right now, 5.15 will be a smaller release where we polish what we have in 5.14, and prepare some things for Qt 6. To reflect that and help us all understand that the development focus is now towards Qt 6, I would like to propose that dev becomes the Qt 6 branch after we branched away 5.14 (and we merge wip/qt6 back into dev). We can then either create a 5.15 branch at the same time, or slightly later, once 5.14 has stabilised a bit more (e.g. after the beta or RC). Read more Also: Qt's Development Branch To Begin Forming Qt 6

Today in Techrights

How to Check Which Debian Version are you Running

Wondering which Debian version are you running? This tutorial teaches you several ways to check Debian version in the terminal. Read more