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Tuesday, 12 Nov 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Android Leftovers

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Android

5 open source plugins for Flutter apps

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OSS

Flutter is the newest addition to Google's programming cadre. Following the success of Android, Kotlin, and Golang, Flutter was created as a cross-platform application development language. It is primarily based on the Dart programming construct and is considered to be the next big programming paradigm because its code can run as a mobile app, a web app, and even a desktop app without any major changes. Supposedly it will support Google's upcoming Fuschia operating system.

Flutter plugins are simple dependencies that extend the language's capabilities. This list of the top five open source Flutter plugins includes both user interface (UI)-related and function-related plugins.

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8 great podcasts for open source enthusiasts

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OSS

Where I live, almost everything is a 20- or 30-minute drive from my home, and I'm always looking for ways to use my car time productively. One way is by listening to podcasts on topics that interest me, so as an open source enthusiast, I subscribe to a variety of open source-related podcasts.

Here are eight Linux and open source podcasts that I Iook forward to every week.

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Leftovers: Certifications, KDE, Ubuntu and Security

Filed under
Misc
  • Top 5 options for Linux certifications

    Linux certifications present an interesting mix of distribution- and brand-agnostic credentials, as well as vendor-specific ones. Many of these offerings provide data center professionals with defined pathways to learn, use and master Linux OS management, features and potential Linux use cases.

    Other programs are more ad hoc and specific to certain IT roles, such as systems engineers or IT administrators, but they go beyond self-taught curriculums and forums. Each program includes coursework and an exam. Depending on the certification, admins can buy everything as a bundle or pay separately for study materials and exams.

  • SimpleMailQt v2.0.0-beta1

    On my last post I talked about the new async simplemail-qt API that I wanted to add, yesterday I finished the work required to have that.

    SMTP (Simple Mail Transfer Protocol) as the name says it’s a very simple but strict protocol, you send a command and MUST wait for the reply, which is rather inefficient but it’s the way it is, having it async means I don’t need an extra thread (+some locking) just to send an email, no more GUI freezes or an HTTP server that is stalled.

    The new Server class has a state machine that knows what reply we are waiting, and which status code is the successful one. Modern SMTP servers have PIPELING support, but it’s rather different from HTTP PIPELING, because you still have to wait for several commands before you send another command, in fact it only allows you to send the FROM the RECIPIENTS email list and DATA commands at once, parse each reply and then send the mail data, if you send the email data before you are allowed by the DATA command the server will just close the connection.

  • Plasma 5 for Slackware – November ktown release

    Dear all, today I released KDE-5_19.11 and it comes with some upgrades to official Slackware packages. Don’t worry – Pat Volkerding kindly added the shared libraries of the official Slackware packages to aaa_elflibs, so if you have been updating your Slackware-current installation properly then nothing will break when you update Slackware’s exiv2 and LibRaw packages to the newer versions contained in the November release of ‘ktown‘.
    Official Slackware package updates for exiv2 and LibRaw will come sometime soon, but it will require Pat to recompile several other packages as well that depend on exiv2 and/or LibRaw. I needed the new exiv2 to compile the latest digikam, so I was pleased with Pat’s cooperation to make this a smooth ‘ktown‘ upgrade for you.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 604
  • Ubuntu-ready Apollo Lake mini-PC features Myriad X AI accelerator

    IEI’s rugged, “ITG-100AI” DIN-rail PC runs on an Apollo Lake SoC and a new “Mustang-MPCIE-MX2” mini-PCIe card with dual Myriad X VPUs. The system ships with 8GB RAM and a 128GB SATA SSD plus GbE, serial, USB, and M.2.

    IEI has launched a compact, Intel Apollo Lake based “ITG-100AI” computer for industrial AI that showcases its Mustang-MPCIE-MX2 AI acceleration card. The fanless, 137 x 102.8 x 49.4mm ITG-100AI supports DIN-rail or desktop mounting and offers a 0 to 50°C range with airflow, as well as 5G shock resistance compliant with IEC68-2-27 and vibration resistance per MIL-STD-810G 514.6C-1.

  • Vulnerability Values Fluctuate Between White, Grey and Black Hats

    A black hat selling vulnerabilities can make as much money as a white hat researcher using bug bounty programs, or a grey hat working for a nation state doing reverse engineering.

    Speaking at a Tenable conference in London last week, director of research Oliver Rochford said that to have people do vulnerability research is expensive, and all of the white, black and grey markets are symbiotic, as despite the difference between being legal and illegal, the different factors “mirror each other as it starts with vulnerability discovery.”

    Rochford said that this “shows how professional cybercrime has become,” pointing to the fact that the main difference between criminal and legal sides are ethics. In one slide, Rochford pointed out vulnerability discovery, exploit research and development are the same for both offense and defensive sides, while the differences fall at the "operationalization" side, where offensive sides look at espionage, sabotage and fraud, while defense sides look at threat intelligence and compensating control adaptation.

    In his research, Rochford showed that in some cases you can earn more as a white hat vulnerability manager than as a black hat, with a black hat able to earn around $75,000 in this sort of work. Rochford said this “is achievable and attractive” and while it was more lucrative to do it legally, if it is not “it is a way to make a living.”

  • Name That Toon: Endpoint Protection

Slow Connections Discriminated Against: Google Stadia and Google Chrome

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Google
  • Google reveal Stadia will only have 12 games available at launch, more later in the year

    With the Stadia streaming service from Google launching on November 19th for those with the Founder's Edition or Premiere Edition, they're finally revealing what will be available.

    It will only have 12, yes 12, titles at launch and a few of them are sequels. They are: Assassin's Creed Odyssey, Destiny 2, GYLT, Just Dance 2020, Kine, Mortal Kombat 11, Red Dead Redemption 2, Thumper, Tomb Raider + Rise + Shadow and lastly Samurai Showdown.

    The only title you will get included in the Stadia Pro subscription (three months free with the Founder/Premier Edition) is Destiny 2, all others you have to pay for. If you stop paying for Stadia Pro, you lose access to any free games claimed and only keep those you've paid for normally.

  • Google Chrome To Begin Marking Sites That Are Slow / Fast

    Chrome has successfully shamed web-sites not supporting HTTPS and now they are looking to call-out websites that do not typically load fast.

    Google announced today that they will begin marking websites that are often either loading slow or fast. Chrome developers are experimenting with ways to show whether a website typically loads fast or slow so the user is aware even before they navigate to a given web page or web app. The changes will be rolled out in future Chrome updates.

Shows and Screencasts: Linux Headlines, Frank Karlitschek, Linux Action News and OpenIndiana 2019.10 Run Through

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OS
GNU
Linux
  • 2019-11-11 | Linux Headlines 46

    Steam gets support for Linux namespaces, some distributions are struggling with the shift from Python 2, Arch Linux supports reproducible builds, and GNOME has a new app in beta.

  • Will Europe Succeed At Democratizing The Cloud?

    Europe (led by Germany and France) is contemplating Gaia-X, its own cloud infrastructure to create interoperability among clouds and also allow local companies to compete in the cloud market dominated by US companies like AWS, Microsoft and Google. It’s an ambitious effort, but will it work? We sat down with Frank Karlitschek, founder of Nextcloud to discuss.

  • Linux Action News 131

    Google steps up support for older Chromebooks, Microsoft Edge is coming to Linux, and the App Defense Alliance teams up to fight Android malware.

    Plus Google Cardboard goes open source, and a neat machine-learning tool to pull songs apart.

  • OpenIndiana 2019.10 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at OpenIndiana 2019.10. Enjoy!

Programming: Mutter & GNOME Shell Hackfest, PyCon Africa 2019 (Recap) and More Python

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Development
  • Mutter & GNOME Shell Hackfest

    A couple of weeks ago, I was fortunate enough to attend the Mutter & GNOME Shell hackfest in Leidschendam.

  • Real Python: PyCon Africa 2019 (Recap)

    PyCon Africa was a wonderful, inspiring, and technically enlightening conference that took place in Accra, Ghana from August 6 to 10, 2019 at the University of Ghana. This conference was the very first pan-African conference for Python developers and was attended by 323 Pythonistas from 26 different countries. Most of the attendees traveled from countries around Africa, and a number of speakers came from the US, the Netherlands, Germany, Brazil, and Italy.

    Python is becoming more and more adopted all across the globe. In Africa, Python is earning a special place for itself, where it’s used extensively for web development and data science. African businesses are looking for developers with Python skills in these areas, and having a PyCon in Africa provides a foundation to help support African programmers.

    [...]

    The day after the main conference was dedicated to sprints! This is where people group up to work on various open source Python projects. I was part of a team that worked on Cookie Cutter and other related projects. I submitted a PR that got merged into the project and I also helped mentor other team members.

    I highly recommend anyone who has not attended a sprint before to do so! It’s a great way to practice your skills, contribute to an open source project, and meet the developers involved with the project.

  • Tutorial: How to Read Stata Files in Python with Pandas

    We are soon going to practically answer how to open a Stata file in Python? In Python, there are two useful packages called Pyreadstat, and Pandas that enable us to open .dta files. If we are working with Pandas, the read_stata method will help us import a .dta into a Pandas dataframe. Furthermore, the package Pyreadstat, which is dependent on Pandas, will also create a Pandas dataframe from a .dta file.

  • Python Software Foundation: Seeking Developers for Paid Contract Improving pip

    The Python Software Foundation Packaging Working Group is receiving funding to work on the design, implementation, and rollout of pip's next-generation dependency resolver. (We'll be able to publicly name the funders later this month and in early December.)

    pip is the official package installer for Python. pip aims to make it easy for the millions of people who use Python to download and install Python libraries and applications (open source and closed source, source and binary, globally and within isolated virtual environments). It's a foundational component of the Python ecosystem and broader computer software and technology landscape.

    This project aims to complete the design, implementation, and rollout of pip's next-generation dependency resolver. This will lower the barriers to installing Python software, empowering users to get a version of a package that works. It will also lower the barriers to distributing Python software, empowering developers to make their work available in an easily reusable form.

    Because of the size of the project, funding has been allocated to secure two contractors, a senior developer and an intermediate developer, to work on development, testing and building test infrastructure, code review, bug triage, and assisting in the rollout of necessary features.

  • Rename all files in a directory to the md5 hash

Database of 200+ smartphones that can run Linux (unofficially)

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GNU
Linux
Gadgets

The vast majority of smartphones in the world ship with some version of Google’s Android operating system. And most of them are only supported by their manufacturers for a few years.

Have a phone that’s 3-4 years old? Then you’re probably not getting any Android updates anymore. No more security patches. No new features.

Of course, some folks can run custom ROMs such as LineageOS, which lets you install updates indefinitely… but want to break out of Android altogether? There are a handful of other GNU/Linux-based operating systems including Ubuntu Touch, postmarketOS, and Maemo Leste that are designed to, among other things, help give your phone a longer lifespan.

One tricky thing can be figuring out which phones are supported. That’s where a new Can My Phone Run Linux database from TuxPhones comes in.

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Linux driver patches indicate AMD is readying integer scaling

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Both Intel and Nvidia have released graphics driver updates to enable integer scaling options this year. Intel made a big song and dance out of the development process with Tweets and blog updates trailing the graphics driver feature. Then integer scaling became available for Intel Gen11 graphics users after a September driver update. Nvidia actually pipped Intel to the post by implementing integer scaling (for Turing GPUs) in its Gamescom driver release in August - it snuck in the update without much fanfare as it simultaneously boosted a number of AAA games performance and added some new image sharpening features.

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Red Hat and SUSE Servers: Boston Children’s Hospital, IBM and SUSE in High-Performance Computing (HPC)

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Red Hat
SUSE
  • How Boston Children’s Hospital Augments Doctors Cognition with Red Hat OpenShift

    Software can be an enabler for healers. At Red Hat, we’ve seen this first hand from customers like Boston Children’s Hospital. That venerable infirmary is using Red Hat OpenShift and Linux containers to enhance their medical capabilities, and to augment their doctors cognitive capacity.

  • Entry Server Bang For The Buck, IBM i Versus Red Hat Linux

    In last week’s issue, we did a competitive analysis of the entry, single-socket Power S914 machines running IBM i against Dell PowerEdge servers using various Intel Xeon processors as well as an AMD Epyc chip running a Windows Server and SQL Server stack from Microsoft. This week, and particularly in the wake of IBM’s recent acquisition of Red Hat, we are looking at how entry IBM i platforms rate in terms of cost and performance against X86 machines running a Linux stack and an appropriate open source relational database that has enterprise support.

    Just as a recap from last week’s story, the IBM i matchup against Windows Server systems were encouraging in that very small configurations of the Power Systems machine running IBM i were less expensive per unit of online transaction processing performance as well as per user. However, on slightly larger configurations of single socket machines, thanks mostly to the very high cost per core of the IBM i operating system and its integrated middleware and database as you move from the P05 to P10 software tiers on the Power S914, the capital outlay can get very large at list price for the Power iron, and the software gets very pricey, too. The only thing that keeps the IBM i platform in the running is the substantially higher performance per core that the Power9 chip offers on machines with four, six, or eight cores.

    Such processors are fairly modest by 2019 standards, by the way, when a high-end chip has 24, 28, 32, or now 64 cores, and even mainstream ones have 12, 16, or 18 cores. If you want to see the rationale of the hardware configurations that we ginned up for the comparisons, we suggest that you review the story from last week. Suffice it to say, we tried to get machines with roughly the same core counts and configuration across the Power and X86 machines, and generally, the X86 cores for these classes of single socket servers do a lot less work.

  • Rise of the Chameleon – SUSE at SC19

    The impact of High-Performance Computing (HPC) goes beyond traditional research boundaries to enhance our daily lives.  SC19 is the international conference for High Performance Computing, networking, storage and analysis taking place in Denver November 17-22.  SUSE will once again have a strong presence at SC19 – and if you are attending we would love to talk to you!  Our SUSE booth (#1917) will include our popular Partner Theater as well as a VR light saber game with a Star Wars themed backdrop.  We will showcase SUSE’s HPC core solutions (OS, tools and Services) as well as AI/ML, Storage and Cloud open source products.  Plus, during the gala opening reception we will premier our new mini-movie “Sam the IT Manager in The Way of the Chameleon: The Quest for HPC” which you don’t want to miss (we’ll provide the popcorn)!

Why we shouldn’t blame ourselves for the Linux desktop’s microscopic marketshare

Filed under
Linux

Well, that was three interesting articles on the same topic on the same day, namely, billionaires. And read in turn they explain exactly why the Linux Desktop is still at such a marginal market share, and why that’s not because we, who work hard on it, are failures who have been doing the wrong thing all the time. It is in the first place policies, bought with money, that allowed people to build monopolies, taxing individuals and so becoming even more rich and powerful.

However, what it is about, is the question: why is Bill Gates not in jail for life with all his wealth stripped off? He’s a criminal, and his crime has directly harmed us, the people working on free software, on the Linux Desktop.

So, to make things painfully clear: Bill Gates made it so that his company would tax every computer sold no matter whether it ran Windows or not. If a manufacturer wanted to sell computers running Windows, all the computers it sold were taxed by Microsoft. He would get paid for the work a Linux distribution was doing, and the Linux distribution would not get that money.

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Software: Gscan2PD, GIMP and LibreOffice

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Software
  • Gscan2PDF 2.6.0 Released with import-all Option

    The official Gscan2PDF PPA has made the new release packages for all current Ubuntu releases, and their derivatives, including Ubuntu 16.04, Ubuntu 18.04, Ubuntu 19.04, Ubuntu 19.10, Linux Mint 18.x and 19.x

  • 5 Tools That Allow You to Make a Free Logo

    2. Gimp

    Unlike Tailor Brands, GIMP is more of a photo editor which means that it comes with way more tools and features.

    If you want to do more than logo designing, then GIMP is your right choice. It comes with a customizable interface that not only covers cosmetics, but also the behavior of the various tools that it has. There are photo enhancement tools that help you to get rid of image distortions, colors, and other imperfections. Another benefit is support for multiple file formats viz. JPEG, PSD, PNG, and GIF.

  • Community Member Monday: Celia Palacios

    I am a Mexican old-guard user of Linux since 2001. I studied Electronic Engineering, and I have been working in that field since 1989. I learnt all sorts of Linux stuff because I love to learn by myself. In addition, I love to read historical detective novels, lots of science fiction, and go to the movies with my husband.

    I love philosophy, symbolism and many alternative ideas about everything. I also like to have long, friendly debates about everybody’s presumptions (or assumptions?). I try to be open-minded, specially in this times when everyone’s getting polarized Mexico about our President. I used to be an athletic gal, but now I am a total coach-potato! Thanks, Netflix!

SUSE Continues Working On Linux Core Scheduling For Better Security

Filed under
Linux
SUSE

SUSE and other companies like DigitalOcean have been working on Linux core scheduling to make virtualization safer particularly in light of security vulnerabilities like L1TF and MDS. The core scheduling work is about ensuring different VMs don't share a HT sibling but rather only the same VM / trusted applications run on siblings of a core.

SUSE's Dario Faggioli presented at the KVM Forum 2019 at the end of October in Lyon, France. Dario's presentation covered the latest work on core-scheduling for virtualization.

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Also: The Disappointing Direction Of Linux Performance From 4.16 To 5.4 Kernels

Security: Updates, Mozilla AMO and Reproducible Arch Linux Packages

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (ampache, chromium, djvulibre, firefox-esr, gdal, and ruby-haml), Fedora (chromium, file, gd, hostapd, nspr, and rssh), openSUSE (bcm20702a1-firmware, firefox, gdal, libtomcrypt, php7, python-ecdsa, python3, samba, and thunderbird), SUSE (apache2-mod_auth_openidc, libssh2_org, and rsyslog), and Ubuntu (bash).

  • Security improvements in AMO upload tools

    We are making some changes to the submission flow for all add-ons (both AMO- and self-hosted) to improve our ability to detect malicious activity.

    These changes, which will go into effect later this month, will introduce a small delay in automatic approval for all submissions. The delay can be as short as a few minutes, but may take longer depending on the add-on file.

    If you use a version of web-ext older than 3.2.1, or a custom script that connects to AMO’s upload API, this new delay in automatic approval will likely cause a timeout error. This does not mean your upload failed; the submission will still go through and be approved shortly after the timeout notification. Your experience using these tools should remain the same otherwise.

  • Reproducible Arch Linux Packages

    Arch Linux has been involved with the reproducible builds efforts since 2016. The goal is to achieve deterministic building of software packages to enhance the security of the distribution.

    After almost 3 years of continued effort, along with the release of pacman 5.2 and contributions from a lot of people, we are finally able to reproduce packages distributed by Arch Linux!

    This enables users to build packages and compare them with the ones distributed by the Arch Linux team. Users can independently verify the work done by our packagers, and figure out if malicious code has been included in the pristine source during the build, which in turns enhances the overall supply chain security. We are one of the first binary distributions that has achieved this, and can provide tooling down to users.

    That was the TL;DR! The rest of the blog post will explain the reproducible builds efforts, and the technical work that has gone into achieving this.

  • Arch Linux Updates Its Kernel Installation Handling

    Arch Linux has updated the behavior when installing the linux, linux-lts, linux-zen, and linux-hardened kernel options on this popular distribution. 

    The actual kernel images for their official Linux, Linux LTS, Linux Zen, and Linux Hardened flavors will no longer be installed to /boot by default. By not having the actual kernel reside on /boot should help those with separate boot partitions that are quite small and avoid running out of space when keeping multiple kernels installed. 

Sparky 2019.11 Special Editions

Filed under
Debian

There are new live/install media of Sparky 2019.11 “Po Tolo” Special Editions available to download: GameOver, Multimedia & Rescue. The live system is based on the testing branch of Debian “Bullseye”.

GameOver Edition features a very large number of preinstalled games, useful tools and scripts. It’s targeted to gamers.

Multimedia Edition features a large set of tools for creating and editing graphics, audio, video and HTML pages.

The live system of Rescue Edition contains a large set of tools for scanning and fixing files, partitions and operating systems installed on hard drives.

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The Many Features & Improvements of the KDE Plasma 5.18 LTS Desktop Environment

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KDE

With the KDE Plasma 5.17 release out the door last month, it's time to take a closer look at the new features and improvements coming to KDE Plasma 5.18, which will be released early next year as the next LTS (Long Term Support) version of open-source desktop environment designed to run on GNU/Linux distributions.

Among the enhancements of the KDE Plasma 5.18 LTS desktop environment, we can mention the ability to select and remove multiple Bluetooth devices simultaneously, support for KSysGuard to display stats for Nvidia graphics hardware, and a new "Home" button in System Settings that will take users back to the main page.

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Open-spec, dual-port router offers a choice of Allwinner H3 or H5

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

FriendlyElec’s Linux-driven, $20 “NanoPi R1S-H3” router uses a modified version of the Allwinner H3-based NanoPi R1, upgrading the second LAN port to GbE while removing a USB port. There’s also a similar, $23 “NanoPi R1S-H5” with a quad -A53 H5.

Back in February, FriendlyElec launched the community-backed NanoPi R1 router SBC, which still sells for $29. Now it has followed up with two more affordable NanoPi R1S routers based on upgraded versions of the NanoPi R1 that that give you dual GbE ports instead of 10/100Mbps and 10/1000/1000Mbps. The mainboards are smaller than the R1 at 55.6 x 52mm, and the board and the case have been entirely redesigned.

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Android Leftovers

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Android
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