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Tuesday, 22 Sep 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

  • Soldat 2 brings the next-generation of fast-paced online platformer action - out now

    Available now in Early Access, the online platformer shooter Soldat 2 brings in the full charm of the original classic that took the early internet by storm and will continue to expand it.

    If you played the original - right now it's very much as you expect. Fast paced, ridiculous, seriously easy to get into and really rather fun. You can't ask for much more in a military-style platformer shooter, it does exactly what it sets out to do. You run, you throw a grenade, you spray and pray and hopefully get a few frags along the way. Slightly prettier than the original but still just as insane.

    [...]

    Plenty more is to come including more of pretty much everything: levels, weapons, vehicles - you name it and it probably will get it at some point. The big idea with Soldat 2 is to be a platform for others to create, as much as it is a game itself so it's going to have full modding support for all sorts of community content.

  • VirtualBox, 15 practical examples
  • Fedora 32 : Testing the Bookworm software.
  • AMD Dimgrey Cavefish and VanGogh Support Lands In Radeon Linux OpenGL Driver

    The latest enablement work landing in the RadeonSI Gallium3D open-source driver is for AMD Dimgrey Cavefish and VanGogh.

    Merged today to Mesa 20.3-devel was VanGogh and Dimgrey Cavefish support.

    VanGogh and Dimgrey Cavefish are both GFX10.3 (Navi 2) parts. Van Gogh has been rumored for a while as a next-gen mobile API with Zen 2 CPU cores and RDNA2 graphics in the 7.5~18 Watt TDP space. Details on Dimgrey Cavefish are light as it's another Linux-specific codename for a Navi 2 part in following the X.Org color + fish family naming convention.

  • Updates for CAP Deployment in public clouds

    Our vision for the SUSE Cloud Application Platform Deployment tool is to provide the simplest experience possible and do so across a variety of supported cloud service providers. Since my last post we’ve made some significant strides, so it’s time to catch up on our status.

  • Create and import COCO datasets into Maximo Visual Inspection

    A lot of work has gone into the labeling UI for IBM Maximo Visual Inspection (MVI). However, there are situations where you want to work with an already existing dataset that was created outside of MVI. Thankfully, MVI already supports importing COCO datasets, label information and all. That’s easy enough. But what if you want to modify or add some images before importing that dataset? Maybe you have some colleagues without access to MVI who need you to keep things in a common format? Or maybe there are other tools that interact with these datasets? We can’t expect everyone else to use MVI’s dataset format.

    I’m hoping this post will help you along in figuring how to do what you need to do outside of MVI. We’re going to create our own little COCO dataset with LabelMe and LabelMe2coco, and turn that into an MVI dataset that we can train MVI models with.

  • Linux on Lenovo, jdk transition to Git, and more industry trends

    The impact: That is an epic list of achievements on behalf of all of us that use Linux on the desktop. Kudos and thank you to the Fedora Desktop team!

  • Red Hat OpenShift Container Storage 4.5 Delivers Kubernetes-Based Data Services

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Release Candidate 3 is here
    Hello everyone,
    
    After some delay, the llvmorg-11.0.0-rc3 tag was just created.
    
    Source code and docs are available at
    https://prereleases.llvm.org/11.0.0/#rc3
    and
    https://github.com/llvm/llvm-project/releases/tag/llvmorg-11.0.0-rc3
    
    Pre-built binaries will be added as they become ready.
    
    Please file bug reports for any issues you find as blockers of
    https://llvm.org/pr46725
    
    Release testers: please start your engines, run the script, share your
    results, and upload binaries. And thank you very much for your help so
    far.
    
    There are currently no open release blockers, so unless anything new
    and bad comes up, this is what the final release will look like.
    
    Thanks,
    Hans
    
  • LLVM 11.0-RC3 Released For This Big LLVM/Clang Update

    LLVM 11.0 was originally scheduled to be released at the end of August while now it looks like that official milestone is coming in the next few days or week.

    Tagged today was LLVM 11.0-RC3 as the belated extra release candidate for this half-year update to the LLVM compiler infrastructure and subprojects like Clang, LLD, FLANG, and libcxx, among others.

  • Excellent Free Books to Learn D

    D is a general-purpose systems programming language with a C-like syntax that compiles to native code.

    It is statically typed and supports both automatic (garbage collected) and manual memory management.

    D programs are structured as modules that can be compiled separately and linked with external libraries to create native libraries or executables.

  • Crosspost: Nginx/Certbot Recipe

    Back in Februrary I posted an article in which I promised a follow up telling you how I now manage my certificates. We’ll all these months later I’ve finally published it to dev.to (to push its reach beyond just Perl) https://dev.to/joelaberger/no-magic-letsencrypt-certbot-and-nginx-configuration-recipe-3a97 .

  • wxPython by Example – Adding a Background Image (Video)

    In this tutorial, you will learn how to add an image to your panel so that you have a background image to put your widgets on.

  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #439 (Sept. 22, 2020)

Linux kernel report shows more than 20,000 contributors since beginning

Filed under
Development
Linux

As the use of Linux has grown, the number and variety of contributors has done likewise. The study found that from 2007 to 2019, there were 780,048 commits accepted into the Linux kernel from 1730 organisations. The top 20 can be seen in the chart in this article.

In this table, unknown refers to contributions for which a supporting employer’s existence could not be determined. None indicates the patches are from developers known to be working on their own time.

The release model for the kernel now has four categories; Prepatch (or “-rc”) kernels, Mainline, Stable, and Long Term Stable. Each release cycle begins with a two-week “merge window” when new features can be reviewed and then included in the git repository for the next release.

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Puppy Linux 9.5 “FossaPup” Is Here to Revive Your Old PC, Based on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS

Filed under
Linux

One of the coolest things about Puppy Linux is that it’s a modular distribution, which means that it lets users swap out the kernel, apps and firmware in seconds. One top of that, it can be turned very easily into a minimal bare bones version just by removing a single file, followed by a reboot, of course.

As its codename suggests, Puppy Linux 9.5 is based on Canonical’s latest Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Focal Fossa) operating system series. This means that users will have access to the official Ubuntu 20.04 LTS software repositories to install any packages they want.

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Announcing Istio 1.6.10

Filed under
Server
Software

This release contains bug fixes to improve robustness. This release note describes what’s different between Istio 1.6.9 and Istio 1.6.10.

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New GNOME Videos

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME

Christian Hergert: GtkSourceView Next

Filed under
Development
GNOME

Earlier this year I started a branch to track GTK 4 development which is targeted for release by end-of-year. I just merged it which means that our recently released gtksourceview-4-8 branch is going to be our LTS for GTK 3. As you might remember from the previous maintainer, GtkSourceView 4.x is the continuation of the GtkSourceView 3.x API with all the deprecated API removed and a number of API improvements.

Currently, GtkSourceView.Next is 5.x targeting the GTK 4.x API. It’s a bit of an unfortunate number clash, but it’s been fine for WebKit so we’ll see how it goes.

It’s really important that we start getting solid testing because GtkSourceView is used all over the place and is one of those “must have” dependencies when moving to a new GTK major ABI.

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Linux Lite 5.2 Is Now Ready for Testing Based on Ubuntu 20.04.1 LTS

Filed under
Linux

While you’re probably enjoying your Linux Lite 5.0 installation, work has begun on the next major release, Linux Lite 5.2, which will be based on Canonical’s Ubuntu 20.04.1 LTS (Focal Fossa) operating system and the long-term supported Linux 5.4 kernel series. As usual, there are also various improvements and new features.

For example, Linux Lite 5.2 will now let users manage the Firewall and Lite Widget settings from the Settings Manager, show laptop battery status in the Lite Widget, as well as to restore the Taskbar and system tray icons to default from the Lite Tweaks utility.

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Microsoft is Bringing Edge Browser to Linux in October

Filed under
Linux

At the Ignite 2020, Microsoft announced that the Chromium-based Edge browser will have a Linux preview build in October this year.
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Security: Site SSL, Cynet an Ksplice-based Patching

Filed under
Security
  • Why You Should Use SSL on Your Website

    With the evolution of the internet, security threats have also risen to a great extent.

    [...]

    SSL is the digital certificate known as the “Secure Socket Layer” that provides the foundation for stronger security on a website. It acts as a shield and safeguard when sensitive information travels from one place to another between computers/servers. SSL can be defined as trustworthy files that cryptographically form an encrypted link between a browser and a web server.

    Any information that is sent or received on a page that is not secure can be hacked and intercepted by cyber-criminals and hackers. Important information, such as bank transaction details and personal details become accessible to hackers.

    A website that is encrypted with SSL binds a secure connection between the web browser and servers to ensure that no third party has access to your information.

  • Cynet Report Details Increase in Cyber Attacks During Pandemic

    Cynet has released a report detailing changes in cyberattacks observed across North America and Europe since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Cynet compared the number of cyberattacks during the COVID-19 outbreak to the previous three months for several industry sectors and saw increases of more than 20 percent in the areas of finance (up 32%), food production (29%), and retail (23%).

  • Security Patching Made Simple for Linux HPC Instances in Oracle Cloud [Ed: Oracle pushing Ksplice as its Linux selling point]

    The explosion of data in today's computing landscape has fueled the need for even greater security to protect the applications and workloads, and is crucial to an organization's success and competitive advantage. This is equally true when running compute intensive high performance computing (HPC) applications that consume large amounts of data, which are critical to an organization’s business or research endeavors. Oracle Cloud Infrastructure provides a platform that can help keep HPC systems secure and improve the speed and stability of applications.

    Security patch management is a challenge given the sheer number of instances in HPC clustered environments. Often, HPC environments are left unpatched for long periods of time, leaving systems exposed due to delays caused by complex, time-consuming, and labor-intensive patch management processes. We'll describe three ways in which this is addressed with Oracle Cloud Infrastructure.

    [...]

    Ksplice, Autonomous Linux, and the OS Management service are provided for Oracle Cloud Infrastructure customers at no additional cost. Oracle Linux HPC customers on Oracle Cloud Infrastructure enjoy additional benefits including free Oracle Linux Premier Support and price per performance advantages. Additionally, Oracle Linux is 100% application binary compatible with RHEL. This means that RHEL customers on Oracle Cloud Infrastructure can eliminate support fees by easily switching to Oracle Linux.

    HPC customers who leverage these advanced Linux patching technologies in Oracle Cloud Infrastructure benefit from improved system security, reduced downtime, simplified operations, and cost savings. To learn more about Oracle Cloud patch management options, sign up for an Oracle Cloud Infrastructure account today and take advantage of free cloud credits.

Automation controller builds on Raspberry Pi CM3+

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Sfera Labs’ “Iono Pi Max” industrial controller runs Linux on a RPi Compute Module 3+ and offers 10/100 LAN, 3x USB, isolated CAN and serial, relay and analog I/Os, plus RTC, UPS, and more.

Sfera Labs has launched an Iono Pi Max edge computing and industrial controller that “combines the high-reliability and bus interfaces of the Strato Pi product line with the I/O capabilities of Iono Pi.” We covered both the Strato Pi CAN and Iono Pi add-on boards for the Raspberry Pi in our 2017 Strato Pi CAN report.Automation controller builds on Raspberry Pi CM3+

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Librem 14 Shipping in December

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

The Librem 14 is going to be a powerhouse with a six core, twelve thread, 4.70Ghz i7-10710U tenth generation Intel CPU. When we first announced the Librem 14 pre-order, we estimated shipping would begin in early Q4 2020 but unfortunately Intel has industry-wide supply issues with the i7-10th gen CPUs which has moved the ship date for the Librem 14 to December 2020.

That’s the bad news. The good news is that the current $100 pre-order sale will continue for a bit longer. We also hope to finish some fresh Librem 14 prototypes in about a week, so we can share new pictures of the design.

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Linux Journal is Back

Filed under
GNU
Linux

As of today, Linux Journal is back, and operating under the ownership of Slashdot Media.

As Linux enthusiasts and long-time fans of Linux Journal, we were disappointed to hear about Linux Journal closing it's doors last year. It took some time, but fortunately we were able to get a deal done that allows us to keep Linux Journal alive now and indefinitely. It's important that amazing resources like Linux Journal never disappear.

We will begin publishing digital content again as soon as we can. If you're a former Linux Journal contributor or a Linux enthusiast that would like to get involved, please contact us and let us know the capacity in which you'd like to contribute. We're looking for people to cover Linux news, create Linux guides, and moderate the community and comments. We'd also appreciate any other ideas or feedback you might have. Right now, we don't have any immediate plans to resurrect the subscription/issue model, and will be publishing exclusively on LinuxJournal.com free of charge. Our immediate goal is to familiarize ourself with the Linux Journal website and ensure it doesn't ever get shut down again.

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Mozilla: More on Firefox 81, Security and UX

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Firefox 81 Arrives with New Theme, Media Controls, PDF Viewer + More

    Mozilla Firefox 81 has been released and it features some genuinely useful improvements.

    I know I probably say the same thing ever release, but last month’s Firefox 80 was a very low-key release for such a high-key milestone.

    Thankfully Mozilla has delivered plenty to talk about in the latest update.

    For instance, the famed open source web browser now lets you to pause/play audio and video in Firefox using keyboard shortcuts (physical ones), via MPRIS (e.g., sound menu), or using a connected headset (assuming it has player controls).

  • Mozilla VR Blog: Your Security and Mozilla Hubs

    Mozilla and the Hubs team takes internet security seriously. We do our best to follow best practices for web security and securing data. This post will provide an overview of how we secure access to your rooms and your data.

    [...]

    When you deploy your own Hubs Cloud instance, you have full control over the instance and its data via AWS or DigitalOcean infrastructure--Mozilla simply provides the template and automatic updates. Therefore, you can integrate your own security measures and technology as you like. Everyone’s use case is different. Hubs cloud is an as-is product, and we’re unable to predict the performance as you make changes to the template.

    Server access is limited by SSH and sometimes two-factor authentication. For additional security, you can set stack template rules to restrict which IP addresses can SSH into the server.

  • Firefox UX: From a Feature to a Habit: Why are People Watching Videos in Picture-in-Picture?

    At the end of 2019, if you were using Firefox to watch a video, you saw a new blue control with a simple label: “Picture-in-Picture.” Even after observing and carefully crafting the feature with feedback from in-progress versions of Firefox (Nightly and Beta), our Firefox team wasn’t really sure how people would react to it. So we were thrilled when we saw signals that the response was positive.

Ubuntu Touch OTA-13 Released with Support for Sony Xperia X and OnePlus 3/3T

Filed under
Linux

The biggest news in this release is, of course, the support for new devices. You can now install the Ubuntu Touch mobile operating system on the Sony Xperia X, Sony Xperia X Compact, Sony Xperia X Performance, Sony Xperia XZ, OnePlus 3, and OnePlus 3T smartphones using the official UBports Installer.

This update also incorporates the QtWebEngine 5.14 components, which updates the built-in Morph Browser to the latest Chromium version, making it up to 25% faster across all devices and enabling support for selecting only the text you want from web pages using the touch handles, as well as to open downloaded PDF, TXT, IMG or MP3 files directly in the browser.

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KTextEditor - Small Things Matter

Filed under
KDE
Software

Thanks to the feedback & patches provided by others, I found a bit more motivation to take a look at the small things that seems to be odd in KTextEditor.

Interesting enough, if you once notice a small detail (like a dead pixel on your display you suddenly find after years of use), it really sticks out like a sore thumb…

Here two small things that caught my interest this week.

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Hardware With Arduino and GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Convert an old cassette player into a synthesizer

    Cassettes (if you remember those) are normally used to play back music and other audio, but what about using an old Walkman-style tape player as the instrument itself? That’s exactly what this project by Zack Scholl allows you to do, varying the playback speed to modify pitch output.

    It’s a very simple setup, requiring one to hook up wires that enable an Arduino Uno and MCP4725 DAC to adjust the speed using a voltage input. A drone sound is recorded on the tape, which may also involve some hacking depending on your equipment.

  • GigaDevice GD32E5 Cortex-M33 microcontrollers target motor and industrial control
  • Making a 3D graphics video for the Librem 5

    At Purism, we do all our videos and other promotional material internally, with Librem hardware and free software only. This is part of our policy and I think it’s important, when I believe in something, to act in accordance with it.

    A few days after releasing the video of the Librem 5 hardware design, I was asked by a few people to publish an article describing the process of making this video.

    In early 2019, we shot a funny commercial for Librem One and I made a blog post, along with a video, to explain the process of making this kind of commercial with Librem hardware and free software. I was not going to do a “behind the scenes” blog post again but the Librem 5 video is entirely made with 3D graphics and the workflow is quite different so I think that it is interesting to describe that process in a new post.

  • AMD Enables Ryzen in Chromebooks, Improving Performance

    A modern enthusiast will scoff at the concept of a Chromebook – limited performance, capabilities, and a simplistic OS for doing some serious work? The fact is that the Chromebook, and Chrome OS, have been gazumping good portions of the notebook market share in recent years, mostly down to its stripped down nature but also the low pricing. In 2019 AMD relaunched its older A-series APUs for Chromebooks, meeting that market need. However, at CES this year we saw the first indication of premium $700+ Chromebooks from Intel. Now AMD is moving into a higher performance space with its Chromebook offerings with new optimized Ryzen hardware and Vega graphics.

    [...]

    AMD claims to have a 21% market share in the Chromebook space, using IDC data, and Chromebooks currently account for 18% of all notebook sales. The market is largely split into three categories: education, enterprise, and consumer, with education seeing a big uplift in recent months due to the pandemic. Also because of the pandemic, as well as the growth of Chromebooks as a viable tool for these markets, use-cases are expanding with new productivity applications becoming available as well as the need to drive multiple high resolution displays.

  • AMD Announces Ryzen/Athlon 3000 C-Series For Chromebooks

    AMD today announced the Ryzen 3000 and Athlon 3000 C-Series processors for use in Google Chromebooks from multiple vendors.

    AMD announced these 3000 C-Series mobile processors as the first Zen optimized Chromebook processors with Acer, ASUS, HP, and Lenovo all committing to releasing AMD Chromebooks in Q4'2020.

    Compared to the previous-generation AMD A-Series "Excavator" APUs in Chromebooks, AMD is promoting up to 251% better graphics performance, up to 104% faster productivity, and up to 152% better photo editing with these new Zen C-Series processors.

  • OnLogic’s Ubuntu-ready AMD servers include compact industrial edge model

    OnLogic has launched a line of AMD servers, including two with 2nd Gen Epyc and three with Ryzen 3000, including a $1,547 and up Compact Industrial AMD Ryzen Edge Server. Meanwhile, AMD launched some 15W mobile Ryzen C-series chips.

    OnLogic and AMD, which last year teamed up on promoting OnLogic mini-PCs based on AMD’s Ryzen Embedded V1000 and R1000 SoCs, are now collaborating on OnLogic’s new lineup of servers based on 2nd Gen Epyc and AMD Ryzen 3000 processors. Most of these are rackmount servers that are beyond our typical product coverage, but we are intrigued by the desktop form-factor Compact Industrial AMD Ryzen Edge Server (MC850-40), which blurs the line with the high-end embedded edge servers.

    [...]

    AMD’s Eypc Embedded SoCs are scaled down versions of the 2nd Gen Epyc SoCs used by OnLogic’s new rackmount systems: the 2U, $2,887 and up MK200-60 and 4U, $5,051 and up MK400-60. These “Eypc Edge Servers” tap the Epyc Rome 7002 in up to 32- and 64-core configurations, respectively, with up to 256GB RAM.

Linux Foundation GNU/Linux Training Milestone

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Microchip releases open source GUI kit for its SAMA5 and SAM9 chips

Filed under
Development
Hardware
Software

Microchip has introduced a free, open source “Ensemble Graphics Toolkit” running on Linux for building C++ based GUIs for its Cortex-A5 SAMA5 and Arm9 SAM9 SoCs.

Microchip has released a free, Apache 2.0 licensed C++ GUI suite for the Linux-powered, single-core, 32-bit SoCs it received from its acquisition of Atmel. The Ensemble Graphics Toolkit (EGT), which is now integrated with Microchip’s Linux4SAM distribution, is designed for Cortex-A5 based SAMA5 SoCs such as the SAMA5D27, which is found on its SAMA5D27 SOM SiP module. It also supports Arm9-based SAM9 SoCs such as the 600MHz SAM9X60 SoC that was announced in March.

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