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Monday, 28 Sep 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

  • Google announces another three games confirmed for Stadia

    As Google continue to build up Stadia, they're gradually announcing more games coming and we have another three smaller indie titles now confirmed.

    The first is Cake Bash, arriving on October 15 which is a four player party game where assorted forms of cake beat each other up. It sounds pretty amusing.

  • Nuno Pinheir: Week log O¹

    In a nutshell, did some stuff, then done it again was happy with parts of it, and finaly ended the week on a positive note with a talk on QtCon brazil 2020

  • Maui Weekly Report 6

    Today, we bring you a new report on the Maui Project progress.

  • Linux Weekly Roundup #97

    We had another exciting week in the world of Linux Releases with the releases of, Enso 0.4, KaOS 2020.09, EndeavourOS 2020.09.20, Linux Lite 5.2-rc1, Bluestar 5.8.10, and Debian 10.6.

  • Stream details, video details and come help out!

    The schedule for the conference has been published for the conference and can be found in the CFP system. Please check out all the great talks we have!

  • Norbert Preining: Cinnamon for Debian – imminent removal from testing

    I have been more or less maintaining Cinnamon now for quite some time, but using it only sporadically due to my switch to KDE/Plasma. Currently, Cinnamon’s cjs package depends on mozjs52, which also is probably going to be orphaned soon. This will precipitate a lot of changes, not the least being Cinnamon being removed from Debian/testing.

  • Cherrytree

    There is a new application available for Sparkers: Cherrytree

  • What is Odoo? Odoo, More than an ERP Software

    What is Odoo? Odoo is open source business management software. Odoo is web based software. Odoo, formerly known as OpenERP, was a traditional ERP player. In this article, we are going to see Odoo is really more than an ERP Software.

    Things started to change for OpenERP as they built a network of 500+ partners worldwide. In 2013, they beheld 2.000.000 users worldwide backed by a robust open-source community.

  • Microsoft issues warning about actively exploited Zerologon vulnerability in Windows

    It is just days since the CISA (Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency) issued an emergency warning about a critical Windows vulnerability. Now Microsoft has issued a warning that the vulnerability is being actively exploited and the company is "actively tracking threat actor activity".

    The Netlogon EoP vulnerability (CVE-2020-1472) is concerning not just because of its severity, but because of the fact that it can be exploited in a matter of seconds. The security issue affects Windows Server 2008 and above, and enables an attacker to gain admin control of a domain.

  • ARDC sponsors the Reproducible Builds project

    The Reproducible Builds project is pleased to announce a donation from Amateur Radio Digital Communications (ARDC) in support of its goals. ARDC’s contribution will propel the Reproducible Builds project’s efforts in ensuring the future health, security and sustainability of our increasingly digital society.

Software: grep 3.5, GnuCash 4.2, Ventoy 1.0.22

Filed under
GNU
Software
  • grep-3.5 released [stable]
    This is to announce grep-3.5, a stable release.
    
    Thanks especially to Paul Eggert, Norihiro Tanaka and Bruno Haible
    for changes both in grep proper and in gnulib.
    
    There have been 56 commits by 3 people in the 38 weeks since 3.4.
    
    
  • GnuCash 4.2

    GnuCash is a personal and small business finance application, freely licensed under the GNU GPL and available for GNU/Linux, BSD, Solaris, Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows. It’s designed to be easy to use, yet powerful and flexible. GnuCash allows you to track your income and expenses, reconcile bank accounts, monitor stock portfolios and manage your small business finances. It is based on professional accounting principles to ensure balanced books and accurate reports.

    GnuCash can keep track of your personal finances in as much detail as you prefer. If you are just starting out, use GnuCash to keep track of your checkbook. You may then decide to track cash as well as credit card purchases to better determine where your money is being spent. When you start investing, you can use GnuCash to help monitor your portfolio. Buying a vehicle or a home? GnuCash will help you plan the investment and track loan payments. If your financial records span the globe, GnuCash provides all the multiple-currency support you need.

  • Ventoy 1.0.22

    Ventoy is an open source tool to create bootable USB drive for ISO/WIM/IMG/VHD(x)/EFI files. With Ventoy, you don't need to format the disk over and over, you just need to copy the ISO/WIM/IMG/VHD(x)EFI files to the USB drive and boot them directly. You can copy many files at a time and ventoy will give you a boot menu to select them. Both Legacy BIOS and UEFI are supported in the same way. Most type of OS supported (Windows/WinPE/Linux/Unix/Vmware/Xen...)

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Perl Weekly Challenge: Week #079: Count Set Bits & Trapped Rain Water

    I really enjoyed this week task. I had lots of fun working with the Trapped Rain Water task.

    This week, I was too busy with my $work, so couldn’t do either Swift coding or live video session. However I promise, I will catch up next week.

  • Add sound to your Python game

    Pygame provides an easy way to integrate sounds into your Python video game. Pygame's mixer module can play one or more sounds on command, and by mixing those sounds together, you can have, for instance, background music playing at the same time you hear the sounds of your hero collecting loot or jumping over enemies.

    It is easy to integrate the mixer module into an existing game, so—rather than giving you code samples showing you exactly where to put them—this article explains the four steps required to get sound in your application.

  • PyDev of the Week: William Cox

    This week we welcome William Cox as our PyDev of the Week. William is a data scientist who has spoken at a few Python conferences. He maintains a blog where you can catch up on what’s new with him

    [...]

    When I was 12 my dad dropped “Teach Yourself Perl in 21 Days” on my desk and said, “you should learn this.” It took me much longer than 21 days, but I’m glad he did that. I dabbled in several languages (PHP, Java, C) but spent many years in graduate school honing my MATLAB skills, due to its powerful plotting and data analysis capabilities. My first job was at a military contractor and they all used MATLAB. This was the early 10’s and Python was really taking off as the language of scientific computing so I was able to convince my boss that it was something I should be learning – he was especially attracted to how much money they could save over thir massive MATLAB bills. I got my 2nd job with my impressive iPython Notebook skills! It was, however, till I started my 2nd job that I finally started learning what it means to write software with a team. It’s a lot different than dabbling on your own.

  • Python Dictionary

    In this post, learn every thing about Python Dictionaries.

  • pkgKitten 0.2.0: Now with tinytest and new docs

    A new release 0.2.0 of pkgKitten just hit on CRAN today, or about eleven months after the previous release.

    This release brings support for tinytest by having pkgKitten::kitten() automagically call tinytest::puppy() if the latter package is installed (and the user did not opt out of calling it). So your newly created minimal package now also uses a wonderful yet tiny testing framework. We also added a new documentation site using the previously tweeted-about wrapper for Material for MkDocs I really dig. And last but not least we switched to BSPM-based Continued Integration (which I wrote about yesterday in R4 #30) and fixed one bug regarding the default NAMESPACE file.

Default window manager switched to CTWM in NetBSD-current

Filed under
OS
BSD

For more than 20 years, NetBSD has shipped X11 with the "classic" default window manager of twm. However, it's been showing its age for a long time now.

In 2015, ctwm was imported, but after that no progress was made. ctwm is a fork of twm with some extra features - the primary advantages are that it's still incredibly lightweight, but highly configurable, and has support for virtual desktops, as well as a NetBSD-compatible license and ongoing development. Thanks to its configuration options, we can provide a default experience that's much more usable to people experienced with other operating systems.

Read more

Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Call an existing REST service with Apache Camel K

    With the release of Apache Camel K, it is possible to create and deploy integrations with existing applications that are quicker and more lightweight than ever. In many cases, calling an existing REST endpoint is the best way to connect a new system to an existing one. Take the example of a cafe serving coffee. What happens when the cafe wants to allow customers to use a delivery service like GrubHub? You would only need to introduce a single Camel K integration to connect the cafe and GrubHub systems.

    In this article, I will show you how to create a Camel K integration that calls an existing REST service and uses its existing data format. For the data format, I have a Maven project configured with Java objects. Ideally, you would have this packaged and available in a Nexus repository. For the purpose of my demonstration, I utilized JitPack, which lets me have my dependency available in a repository directly from my GitHub code. See the GitHub repository associated with this demo for the data format code and directions for getting it into JitPack.

  • Build a data streaming pipeline using Kafka Streams and Quarkus

    In typical data warehousing systems, data is first accumulated and then processed. But with the advent of new technologies, it is now possible to process data as and when it arrives. We call this real-time data processing. In real-time processing, data streams through pipelines; i.e., moving from one system to another. Data gets generated from static sources (like databases) or real-time systems (like transactional applications), and then gets filtered, transformed, and finally stored in a database or pushed to several other systems for further processing. The other systems can then follow the same cycle—i.e., filter, transform, store, or push to other systems.

    In this article, we will build a Quarkus application that streams and processes data in real-time using Kafka Streams. As we go through the example, you will learn how to apply Kafka concepts such as joins, windows, processors, state stores, punctuators, and interactive queries. By the end of the article, you will have the architecture for a realistic data streaming pipeline in Quarkus.

  • Fedora 32 : Can be better? part 012.

    Pidgin is a chat program which lets you log into accounts on multiple chat networks simultaneously. Pidgin can be install on multiple operating systems and platforms. Pidgin is compatible with the following chat networks out of the box: I.R.C., Jabber/XMPP, Bonjour, Gadu-Gadu, IRC, Novell GroupWise Messenger, Lotus Sametime, SILC, SIMPLE, and Zephyr. Can it be better? The only problems a user in need of help may have are in the command line environment. Obviously, in this case, this application cannot be used. I would suggest building a terminal application like WeeChat dedicated to Fedora users and including I.R.C channels. Now, let's install this application.

Touchégg 2.0.0 Released: A Linux Multi-Touch Gesture Recognizer App

Filed under
GNU
Linux

For years, it has continued to work in every desktop environment. However, as the Linux desktop has advanced a lot, Touchégg fails to work on desktop environments using modern technologies like Wayland compositor.

Therefore, Jose has now revised, completely rewrote the old version, and released a new version 2.0.0 after more than years of gap. The new release aims to make the app compatible with new technology stacks incorporated in GNOME, KDE, and other desktops.

Read more

Linux 5.10: Freedreno/MSM Driver and Broadcom Ethernet

Filed under
Linux
  • MSM Adreno DRM Driver For Linux 5.10 Has DisplayPort, Per-Process Pagetables

    Rob Clark who founded the Freedreno/MSM driver project and current Googler sent in the MSM direct rendering manager driver updates targeting the upcoming Linux 5.10 merge window. This time around the Adreno kernel graphics/display driver has some notable additions.

    With Linux 5.10 the MSM DRM driver now has DisplayPort output support for Adreno hardware with DP outputs.

  • Broadcom Has 200G Ethernet Link Speed Support Coming To Its Driver For Linux 5.10

    Broadcom engineers have prepared their Linux network driver infrastructure for supporting 200G link speeds.

    Coming to Broadcom's "bnxt_en" Linux network driver in Linux 5.10 are the necessary alterations for handling 200G links. It was back in late 2018 when Broadcom first announced the world's first 200G Ethernet controller utilizing 50G PAM-4 and PCI Express 4.0. Now as we approach the end of 2020 and prepping for an interesting 2021 of new hardware, bnxt_en is ready with this 200G Ethernet link speed.

5 ways to conduct user research with an open source mindset

Filed under
OSS

There are common beliefs about user experiences—the best ones are user-centered, iterative, and intuitive. When user experience (UX) research is conducted, user stories about these experiences are collected—but the research methods chosen inform user experiences, too.

So, what makes for an engaging research experience, and how can methods evolve alongside products to better connect with users?

Red Hat's User Experience Design (UXD) research team has the answer: a community-centered, open source mindset.

As a UX writer on Red Hat's UXD team, I create new design documentation, empower team voices, and share Red Hat's open source story. My passion lies in using content to connect and inspire others. On our Twitter and Medium channels, we share thought leadership about UX writing, research, development, and design, all to amplify and grow our open source community. This community is at the heart of what we do. So when I learned how the research team centers community throughout their user testing, I leaped at the chance to tell their story.

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Linux Jargon Buster: What is FOSS (Free and Open Source Software)? What is Open Source?

Filed under
GNU
OSS

FOSS means Free and Open Source Software. It doesn’t mean software is free of cost. It means that source code of the software is open for all and anyone is free to use, study and modify the code. This principle allows other people to contribute to the development and improvement of a software like a community.

In the 60s and 70s, computers were hardware focused and the hardware were expensive. They were mainly used by academics in universities or researchers in labs. The limited amount of software used to come for free or with their source code and the users were allowed to modify the source code to suit their need.

In the late 70s and early 80s, the manufacturer’s stopped distributing source code in an attempt to not let their software run on their competitor’s computers.

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Announce: OpenSSH 8.4 released

Filed under
Security
BSD

It is now possible[1] to perform chosen-prefix attacks against the SHA-1 algorithm for less than USD$50K. For this reason, we will be disabling the "ssh-rsa" public key signature algorithm by default in a near-future release.

This algorithm is unfortunately still used widely despite the existence of better alternatives, being the only remaining public key signature algorithm specified by the original SSH RFCs.

The better alternatives include: [...]

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Tiny Rock Pi S and Raspberry Pi

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

  • Tiny Rock Pi S SBC gets 802.3af PoE & audio HAT add-on board

    Powered by a Rockchip RK3308 quad-core Cortex-A35 processor, Radxa Rock Pi S single board computer was launched with specifications listing PoE support via an add-on board. Just one little problem though: it was not available for sale.

    The good news is that Radxa has now launched a PoE HAT for the Linux SBC adding support for 802.3af PoE up to 10W input, making it one of the smallest single board computers with PoE support in the world, and adding audio features with a 3.5mm audio jack, and an FPC connector for a microphone array. It can be purchased on Seeed Studio for $13.00.

  •   

  • Raspberry Pi: Five handy home office projects to try

    Initially designed as a low-cost computing board for teaching kids to code, the Raspberry Pi has since evolved into a fully fledged PC comfortably capable of replacing your desktop setup. At the same time, the board's legions of dedicated fans have ensured a steady stream of ingenious open-source projects: media center, weather station, virtual assistant, Lego-powered book scanner – if you can imagine it, the chances are it's been done.

    [...]

    Cybersecurity has become a major concern for companies while their employees are working from home, who now have far less visibility on the devices being used to access corporate data. While a Raspberry Pi won't provide the solution for IT admins, it can be modified into a handy network-monitoring tool that will allow you to keep an eye on devices and data connecting to your home network.

  •  

  • Iain R. Learmonth: Multicast IPTV

    For almost a decade, I’ve been very slowly making progress on a multicast IPTV system. Recently I’ve made a significant leap forward in this project, and I wanted to write a little on the topic so I’ll have something to look at when I pick this up next. I was aspiring to have a useable system by the end of today, but for a couple of reasons, it wasn’t possible.

    [...]

    The Raspberry Pi devices will run DVBlast, an open-source DVB demultiplexer and streaming server. Each of the tuners will be tuned to a different transponder giving me the ability to stream any combination of available channels simultaneously. This is everything that would be needed to watch TV on PCs on the home network with VLC.

    I’ve not yet worked out if Kodi will accept multicast streams as a TV source, but I do know that Tvheadend will. Tvheadend can also act as a PVR to record programmes for later playback so is useful even if the multicast streams can be viewed directly.

    So how far did I get? I have built two Raspberry Pis in cases with the DVB-T hats on. They need to sit in the lounge as that’s where the antenna comes down from the roof. There’s no wired network connection in the lounge. I planned to use an OpenBSD box as a gateway, bridging the wireless network to a wired network.

Audiocasts/Shows/YouTube Videos: Linux Action News, GNU World Order and More

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Linux Action News 156

    Lenovo expands its Linux lineup in a big way, with 30 Ubuntu systems. And why Microsoft Edge on Linux might be more significant than you think.

    Plus, the latest Mozilla project being spun-out, and how Timescale might have a solution for a self-sustaining open-source business in the cloud era.

  • GNU World Order 373

    **madplay**, **abxtest**, and the **man** package of the **ap** Slackware package set.

  • Deepin 20: Big Sur? - Deepin v20 Review

    There is widespread adoption of a certain macOS design trend in the latest release of deepin. This desktop OS is beautiful in its latest iteration, but is the beauty only skin deep?

  • Why Choose Manjaro KDE Plasma 20.1?

    Manjaro 20.1 Mikah is one of the main players in desktop Linux. With the 20.1 release, I boot up the KDE Plasma edition to explore why you should consider this distribution if you value choice in your Linux OS.

  • Wait, there's a GNOME OS now?

    Yep, and now YOU can try it! With the new release of @GNOME 3.38, the developers also released something called GNOME OS. What's this all about? Jason has used it, and he fills you in on this cool initiative that aims to further improve one of the most popular Linux desktop environments.

  • Linux Laptops Have A Price Problem

    Want to see more Linux laptops built and priced for the average PC user? It needs to happen, but the people covering Linux are part of the problem. And that includes me! So how do we solve this?

  • JC's Top 5 Linux Myths

Review: Linuxfx 10.6

Filed under
Reviews

The Linuxfx distribution, which is sometimes referred to as "Windowsfx" on the project's website and in various applications, is based on Linux Mint and appears to one have overarching goal: to look and act as much like Microsoft Windows 10 as possible. The distribution does this by adjusting the desktop, theme, icons, and settings panel to look as much like Microsoft's operating system as possible. The project then adds in WINE, a virtual assistant application, and adjusts application launchers to resemble those used by Windows. Under the hood though Linuxfx is still very much running Linux Mint packages as its base with the Cinnamon desktop environment.

I was surprised to find the distribution's recent stable release, 10.5, has been removed from the project's download mirrors. The only edition available to me was a new version labablled 10.6 which runs on 64-bit (x86_64) machines exclusively. The download for this live media is 3.8GB in size.

Note: Following writing this review, just before publication, the Linuxfx team removed the free downloads for version 10.6 (and earlier versions of the distribution) from their website. The distribution is now a commercial offering.

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LibreOffice 10th Anniversary

Filed under
LibO

Today is LibreOffice 10th Anniversary: it is a significant achievement for the project, and a date to remember for all community members.

We have created a video based on pictures of community members and a few events, in two versions: a long one, for blogs and websites, and a short version for social media.

Read more

Linux 5.9 RC7

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.9-rc7
    So we finally have all the issues I know about sorted out - the fix
    for the VM issue I mentioned in the rc6 announcement is here, as is
    the fix for the slab corruption issue that was separately discussed,
    along with another silly page locking bug one-liner fix.
    
    But while I do now know of any remaining gating issues any more, the
    fixes came in fairly late. So unless I feel insanely optimistic and/or
    a burning bush tells me that everything is bug-free, my plan right now
    is that I'll do another rc next Sunday rather than the final 5.9
    release. And btw, please no more burning bushes. We're kind of
    sensitive about those on the West coast right now.
    
    Anyway, while the MM side is what kept me on my toes last week, most
    of the changes here are actually drivers and networking. And
    networking drivers. With a small smattering of documentation and
    filesystem fixes and other noise thrown in.
    
    Shortlog appended, but what I really hope you all will do is to give
    it a nice good testing. One extra week or rc kernels will help, but
    only if people actually try this out.
    
    So.. Please?
    
                  Linus
    
  • Kernel prepatch 5.9-rc7

    The 5.9-rc7 kernel prepatch is out for testing. "But while I do now know of any remaining gating issues any more, the fixes came in fairly late. So unless I feel insanely optimistic and/or a burning bush tells me that everything is bug-free, my plan right now is that I'll do another rc next Sunday rather than the final 5.9 release. And btw, please no more burning bushes. We're kind of sensitive about those on the West coast right now."

  • Linux 5.9 Stable Expected In Two Weeks, But For Now Is Linux 5.9-rc7

    Linus Torvalds just released Linux 5.9-rc7 as the newest weekly test candidate for Linux 5.9. Due to the regressions encountered this cycle and prominent issues being resolved late, he's looking at releasing Linux 5.9 in two weeks time rather than next week.

today's leftovers

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Misc
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