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Saturday, 19 Oct 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Samsung discontinues ‘Linux on DeX’ program Roy Schestowitz 2 19/10/2019 - 7:00pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 19/10/2019 - 5:06pm
Story Leftovers: GNOME/GTK, Android-x86, Fedora, LibreOffice and More Roy Schestowitz 19/10/2019 - 4:21pm
Story Proprietary Software, Games, Patent Traps/Tax and Openwashing Roy Schestowitz 19/10/2019 - 4:18pm
Story Linux Devices/Open Hardware Roy Schestowitz 19/10/2019 - 4:15pm
Story Graphics: Gallium3D and AMDGPU Roy Schestowitz 19/10/2019 - 4:00pm
Story today's howtos and programming bits Roy Schestowitz 19/10/2019 - 3:49pm
Story Server: Mirantis, Containers, GraalVM and Pensando Roy Schestowitz 19/10/2019 - 3:44pm
Story SUSE/OpenSUSE: Ceph and OpenSUSE's Tumbleweed Progress Roy Schestowitz 19/10/2019 - 3:32pm
Story EPA and EPAAR Roy Schestowitz 19/10/2019 - 3:28pm

Leftovers: GNOME/GTK, Android-x86, Fedora, LibreOffice and More

Filed under
Misc
  • g_array_steal() and g_ptr_array_steal() in GLib 2.63.1

    Another set of new APIs in the upcoming GLib 2.63.1 release allow you to steal all the contents of a GArray, GPtrArray or GByteArray, and continue using the array container to add more contents to in future.

    This is work by Paolo Bonzini and Emmanuel Fleury, and will be available in the soon-to-be-released 2.63.1 release.

  • GNOME Shell Hackfest 2019

    This week, I have attended the GNOME Shell Hackfest 2019 held in Leidschendam, The Netherlands. It was a fantastic event, in a fantastic city! The list of attendees was composed of key members of the community, so we managed to get a lot done — a high amount of achievements for only three days of hackfest, in fact.

  • Android-x86: Run Android on your PC: Release Note 7.1-r3

    The Android-x86 project is glad to announce the release of 7.1-r3. This is the third stable release for Android-x86 7.1 (nougat-x86). The prebuilt images are available in the following site as usual:
    https://www.fosshub.com/Android-x86-old.html
    https://osdn.net/rel/android-x86/Release%207.1

    Key Features

    The 7.1-r3 is mainly a bugfixes release of 7.1-r2. It based on Android 7.1.2 Nougat MR2 security updates (android-7.1.2_r39). Some newer features are also back-ported from 8.1 release. We encourage users of 7.1-r2 or older release upgrade to this release.

  • David Cantrell: rpminspect-0.8 released (and a new rpminspect-data-fedora)

    Work on the test suite continues with rpminspect and it is finding a lot of corner-case type runtime scenarios. Fixing those up in the code is nice. I welcome contributions to the test suite. You can look at the tests/test_*.py files to see what I'm doing and then work through one inspection and do the different types of checks. Look in the lib/inspect_NAME.c file and for all of the add_result() calls to figure out what tests should exist in the test suite. If this is confusing, feel free to reach out via email or another means and I can provide you with a list for an inspection.

  • Fedora Community Blog: FPgM report: 2019-42

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week. Fedora 31 was declared No-Go. We are currently under the Final freeze.

    I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

  • New Feature in Libreoffice: Full-Sheet Previews

    The feature was developed on the cp-6.2 branch of LibreOffice code-base (which is basicly Collabora Office 6.2), and is already available in Collabora Office snaphots. And is being backported to LibreOffice master, so it will be also available in LibreOffice development builds and soon in the Collabora Office snapshots.

  • Rooting for ZFS | TechSNAP 414

    We dive into Ubuntu 19.10’s experimental ZFS installer and share our tips for making the most of ZFS on root.

    Plus why you may want to skip Nest Wifi, and our latest explorations of long range wireless protocols.

  • 2019-10-18 | Linux Headlines

    Researchers discover a kernel bug that can crash Linux devices, Fedora 31’s release date slips, Cedalo opens up its Streamsheets code, Google announces the Android NDK 21 beta, and Unix turns 50.

  • Google Launches A Refreshed Pixelbook Laptop At $649

    Say hello to a more affordable Chromebook that's lightweight and more fun to type on.

Proprietary Software, Games, Patent Traps/Tax and Openwashing

Filed under
Software
  • Adobe Announces Plan To Essentially Steal Money From Venezuelans Because It 'Has To' Due To US Sanctions

    Adobe has long had a history of questionable behavior, when it comes to the rights of its customers, and how the public is informed on all things Adobe. With the constant hammering on the concept that software it sells is licensed rather than purchased, not to mention with the move to more SaaS and cloud-based software, the company is, frankly, one of the pack leaders in consumers not actually owning what they bought.

  • Fantasy tactical RPG Wildermyth blends a mix of hand-painted 2D and 3D art & arrives on Steam soon

    With character art during the turn-based battles that look like paper cutouts in a 3D environment, Wildermyth certainly has a strange and lovely charm to it.

    Currently available on itch.io where users have been testing it for some time, Worldwalker Games have now announced that their character-driven tactical RPG will enter Early Access on Steam on November 13. In Wildermyth, your party will be tasked with defending the lands from various threats, switching between the turn-based combat and making decisions on the over-world map. It has choice-based comic-styled events, which can end up changing your heroes' appearance, personalities, relationships, and abilities.

  • Paragon Looks To Upstream Their Microsoft exFAT Driver For The Linux Kernel

    With the upcoming Linux 5.4 kernel release there is now an exFAT file-system driver based on an old Samsung code drop of their exFAT driver support for mobile devices. This comes after Microsoft made the exFAT specification public recently and gave their blessing for a native Linux driver for the file-system. The Linux developers acknowledge though the current exFAT code is "horrible" and a "pile of crap" but is within the staging area.

    So in Linux 5.4's staging is this preliminary read-write driver for exFAT that continues to be cleaned up and further improved upon. Meanwhile there is also another out-of-tree exFAT Linux driver based on Samsung's sdFAT code that is said to be in better shape than the mainline code. But now there's another option with Paragon Software wanting to upstream their own exFAT driver into the Linux kernel.

  • VMware’s Joe Beda: Enterprise Open Source Is Growing [Ed: “Enterprise Open Source” means proprietary software and openwashing for marketing purposes]

    One of the fathers of Kubernetes says enterprise customers see the most benefit from the community-driven approach because their users get the opportunity to influence the direction development takes.

Linux Devices/Open Hardware

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • Site.js and Pi

    Chatting about Pi, on a Pi, with a chat server running on Site.js on the same Pi.

  • This MicroATX Motherboard is Based on Phytium FT2000/4 Arm Desktop SoC @ 3.0 GHz
  • Rikomagic R6 Review – Part 1: Android Mini Projector’s Unboxing and First Boot

    Rikomagic R6 is a mini Android projector that looks like a vintage radio, or depending on your point of view a mini vintage television.

  • Brief on Behalf of Amicus Curiae Open Source Hardware Association in Curver Luxembourg, SARL v. Home Expressions Inc., No. 18-2214 (Fed. Cir.)

    Curver Luxembourg, SARL v. Home Expressions Inc. is a case of first impression for the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. The question on appeal is whether a design patent’s scope is tied to the article of manufacture disclosed in the patent.

    In this amicus brief, the Open Source Hardware Association (“OSHWA”) explains the potential effects on open source hardware development, and design practice generally, of untethering design patent protection from the article of manufacture disclosed in the patent. A large percentage of open-source hardware combines both ornamental and functional elements, and industrial design routinely involves applying design concepts from disparate fields in novel ways. To engage in this practice, open-source hardware designers need to know the universe of available source material and its limits. Further, understanding the licensing requirements of open-source hardware begins with understanding how the elements that make up that hardware may or may not be protected by existing law. Accordingly, while many creators of open-source hardware do not seek patent protection for their own creations, an understandable scope of design patent protection is nonetheless essential to their ability to collaborate with other innovators and innovate lawfully.

    The brief argues that the District Court in the case—and every district court that has considered the issue—correctly anchored the patented design to the article of manufacture when construing the patent. The brief explains that anchoring the patented design to the disclosed article of manufacture is the best approach, for several reasons. Connecting the patented design to the disclosed article of manufacture calibrates the scope of design patent protection to the patentee’s contribution over the prior art. It avoids encumbering the novel and nonobvious application of prior designs to new articles of manufacture, a fundamental and inventive practice of industrial design. It aligns the scope of design patent protection with its purpose: encouraging the inventive application of a design to an article of manufacture. This balances protection for innovative designs with later innovators’ interest in developing future designs. Finally, anchoring the patented design to the disclosed article of manufacture helps fulfill design patent law’s notice function by clarifying the scope of protection.

Graphics: Gallium3D and AMDGPU

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Gallium3D's Mesa State Tracker Sees "Mega Cleanup" For NIR In Mesa 19.3

    AMD developer Marek Olšák has landed a "mega cleanup" to the Gallium3D Mesa state tracker code around its NIR intermediate representation handling.

    As part of getting the NIR support in good enough shape for default usage by the RadeonSI driver, Marek has been working on a number of clean-ups involving the common Gallium / Mesa state tracker code for NIR.

  • AMDGPU DC Looks To Have PSR Squared Away - Power-Savings For Newer AMD Laptops

    It looks like as soon as Linux 5.5 is where the AMDGPU kernel driver could be ready with Panel Self Refresh (PSR) support for enabling this power-savings feature on newer AMD laptops.

    While Intel's Linux driver stack has been supporting Panel Self Refresh for years, the AMD support in their open-source Linux driver code has been a long time coming. We've seen them working towards the support since Raven Ridge and now it appears the groundwork has been laid and they are ready to flip it on within the Display Core "DC" code.

today's howtos and programming bits

Filed under
Development
HowTos
  • CentOS 8 Package Management with DNF on the Command Line
  • AdamW’s Debugging Adventures: “dnf is locked by another application”
  • Managing user accounts with Cockpit
  • Download Ubuntu 19.10 ISO image to install on VirtualBox VM
  • GNU poke: Dealing with alternatives - Unions in Poke

    Computing with data whose form is not the most convenient way to be manipulated, like is often the case in unstructured binary data, requires performing a preliminary step that transforms the data into a more convenient representation, usually featuring a higher level of abstraction. This step is known in computer jargon as unmarshalling, when the data is fetch from some storage or transmission media or, more generally, decoding.

    Once the computation has been performed, the result should be transformed back to the low-level representation to be stored or transmitted. This is performed in a closing step known as marshalling or, more generally, encoding.

    Consider the following C program whose purpose is to read a 32-bit signed integer from a byte-oriented storage media at a given offset, multiply it by two, and store the result at the same offset.

  • Android NDK r21 moves to beta

    Android announced that NDK r21 is now in beta. Android NDK is a toolset for implementing parts of an app in native code. The release — which is the first long term support release — includes improved defaults for better security and performance.

    One of the key features in the release is an update to GNU Make to version 4.2, which provides a number of bug fixes, and enables ‘–output-sync’ to avoid interleaving output with error messages, the team explained. This is enabled by default with ndk-build.

    Additionally, GDB, the GNU project debugger, has been updated to version 8.3, which includes fixes for debugging modern Intel CPUs.

  • What is the history behind C Programming and Unix?

    If you think C programming and Unix are unrelated, then you are making a big mistake. Back in the 1970s and 1980s, if the Unix engineers at Bell Labs had decided to use another programming language instead of C to develop a new version of Unix, then we would be talking about that language today.

    The relationship between the two is simple; Unix is the first operating system that is implemented with a high-level C programming language, got its fame and power from Unix. Of course, our statement about C being a high-level programming language is not true in today’s world.

    This article is an excerpt from the book Extreme C by Kamran Amini. Kamran teaches you to use C’s power. Apply object-oriented design principles to your procedural C code. You will gain new insight into algorithm design, functions, and structures. You’ll also understand how C works with UNIX, how to implement OO principles in C, and what multiprocessing is.

Server: Mirantis, Containers, GraalVM and Pensando

Filed under
Server
  • Mirantis Partners With OpenStack Foundation to Support Upgraded COA Exam

    “With the OpenStack market forecasted to grow to $7.7 billion by 2022 according to 451 research, the demand for Certified OpenStack Administrators is clearly strong and set to continue growing for many years to come,” said Mark Collier, COO of the OpenStack Foundation. “We are excited to collaborate with Mirantis, who has stepped up to provide the resources needed to manage the COA, including the administration of the vendor-neutral OpenStack certification exam.”

  • How to use containers with an eye on security

    Containers are all the rage. With good reason. With containers, your company’s apps and service deployments become considerably more agile, more reliable, and even more secure. This is true for software development companies (who develop apps and services for other businesses), as well as companies looking to roll out web-based and mobile applications with an unheard of speed and reliability.

    But with any new technology, comes hurdles. One of the biggest hurdles for any business is security. Data breaches have become rampant and it’s on the shoulders of every company to do everything in their power to make sure they are rolling out technology that is as secure as possible. This idea should certainly be applied to containers.

    But what can you do to use containers security? Fortunately, there are a few steps that you can take from the very beginning.

  • GraalVM: Clearing up confusion around the term and why Twitter uses it in production

    What does the “umbrella term” GraalVM stand for? We interviewed Chris Thalinger (Twitter) at JAX London 2019. Hear what he has to say about the meaning of Graal and how it can benefit Twitter as well as the environment.

  • Pensando Systems Exits Stealth Mode With Plans To Take On Amazon AWS

    While normally we don't cover hardware start-ups on Phoronix, Pensando Systems has just exited stealth and given their focus will be heavily involved with Linux and in fact already have their first kernel driver mainlined.

    After announcing a $145 million (USD) Series-C round, Pensando Systems exited "stealth" and revealed the first details of what they are trying to achieve with this company led by many ex-Cisco staff.

    [...]

    Pensando has been on our radar since as I wrote about last month when they were just a stealth networking startup they already upstreamed their first Linux kernel driver. In the Linux 5.4 kernel is a Pensando "Ionic" driver for a family of network adapters. In this week's press release, Pensando didn't specifically call out Ionic but presumably is the backbone to their hardware. Now that they are beginning to talk about their ambitions, hopefully we see more Linux kernel patches from them soon.

SUSE/OpenSUSE: Ceph and OpenSUSE's Tumbleweed Progress

Filed under
SUSE
  • Can I deploy Ceph on older hardware?

    You just retired a bunch of servers and disk arrays, but before you place hundreds of thousands or millions of dollars’ worth of equipment on the curb, you’re wondering if you can use it for a Ceph-based storage solution like SUSE Enterprise Storage. The answer is: maybe.

    SUSE prides itself on supporting a wide range of hardware, from blades to retail terminals to IoT devices. In fact, SUSE makes it possible to easily deploy a wide range of software on that hardware and certify it will work through the SUSE YES Certification Program. SUSE Yes Certification assures your IHV equipment is fully compatible with SUSE software, including SUSE Enterprise Storage.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2019/42

    Another week has passed with again four snapshots published. This pace seems to be holding pretty solid and I think it’s not the worst speed there is. During this week, we have released the snapshots 1011, 1012, 1014 and 1016. As usual, some were smaller, some were bigger.

EPA and EPAAR

Filed under
OSS
  • EPA Rule Will Make Its Custom Code Open Source By Default

    The Environmental Protection Agency is getting ready to default to making all its custom code open source, finally meeting an Office of Management and Budget policy instituted during the last administration.

    The EPA will publish a notice Friday in the Federal Register soliciting public comment on a new open-source policy that will be added to the agency’s acquisition regulations. The clause—which will be added to all EPA contracts that include the use of open-source software or the development of custom code that may or may not be shared widely—will require contractors to provide the agency with all “underlying source code, license file, related files, build instructions, software user’s guides, automated test suites and other associated documentation as applicable,” according to the notice.

  • Environmental Protection Agency Acquisition Regulation (EPAAR); Open Source Software

    A Proposed Rule by the Environmental Protection Agency on 10/18/2019

    [...]

    The EPA is writing a new EPAAR clause to address open source software requirements at EPA, so that the EPA can share custom-developed code as open source code developed under its procurements, in accordance with Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Memorandum M-16-21, Federal Source Code Policy: Achieving Efficiency, Transparency, and Innovation through Reusable and Open Source Software. In meeting the requirements of Memorandum M-16-21 the EPA will be providing an enterprise code inventory indicating if the new code (source code or code) was custom-developed for, or by, the agency; or if the code is available for Federal reuse; or if the code is available publicly as open source code; or if the code cannot be made available due to specific exceptions.

Samsung discontinues ‘Linux on DeX’ program

Filed under
OS
Android
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu
  • Samsung discontinues ‘Linux on DeX’ program, removing support w/ Android 10

    Late last year, Samsung and Canonical partnered on an app that allowed select Galaxy phones to run a full Linux desktop on top of Android. Less than a year later, Samsung has announced that they’re discontinuing the Linux on DeX program, coinciding with the update to Android 10.

    One of the sci-fi-style dreams that many of us have had since the onset of smartphones is the idea of plugging your phone into a desktop-size monitor to get a desktop-style experience. Through the years, many have attempted it in earnest, and the latest offering from Samsung brought an interesting approach.

  • Samsung Calls It Quits on the ‘Linux on DeX’ Project

    Samsung DeX, if you have heard of it, allows the users to turn their Galaxy phones into desktop PCs simply by connecting a monitor and other peripherals. The company made DeX more welcoming and useful for Galaxy flagship users by partnering with Canonical earlier last year. It made it possible for users to run a full Linux desktop instance on its DeX-supported flagship phones.

    This was an amazing feature for developers and users who didn’t really like carrying a laptop with them. They could rely on their Galaxy flagship (including the Galaxy S and Note-series) for a desktop-like experience, running Ubuntu on the move. However, the response to Linux on DeX seems to have been lackluster and Samsung has decided to shutter this project.

  • Samsung is discontinuing Linux support on Dex

    Samsung goes on to explain that starting with its Android 10 beta ROMS, already rolling out on certain devices, Linux support will be removed from Dex altogether. This does make us wonder if, perhaps, the third-party OS emulation setup Samsung was employing to get Linux to work in the first place somehow breaks certain rules or security policies Google implemented with the latest Android version.

    Regardless of whether or not this is the case, if you are currently using Linux on Dex, you definitely want to start keeping regular backups of your data. Since, given current developments even staying on Android 9 and not updating your phone's Android OS still might not be a sure-fire way to keep the feature running.

To space and beyond with open source

Filed under
OSS

The Cambridge Dictionary defines curiosity as "an eager wish to know or learn about something." It's curiosity that fuels our drive to acquire knowledge about outer space, but what drives our curiosity, our "eager wish," in the first place?

I believe that our curiosity is driven by the desire to escape the unpleasant feeling of uncertainty that is triggered by acknowledging our lack of knowledge. The intrinsic reward that comes from escaping uncertainty pushes us to find a correct (or at least a less wrong) answer to whatever question is at hand.

If we want space discovery to advance at a faster pace, we need more people to become aware of the rewards that are waiting for them when they make the effort and discover answers for their questions about the universe. Space discovery is admittedly not an easy task, because finding correct answers requires following rigorous methods on a long-term scale.

Luckily, open source initiatives are emerging that make it easier for people to get started exploring and enjoying the beauty of outer space.

Read more

Announcing the release of LTTng 2.11

Filed under
Linux

We're happy to announce the release of LTTng 2.11 "Lafontaine".
This is a combined release announcement for the 2.11.0 - "Lafontaine" release of the LTTng Tools, LTTng UST, and LTTng modules projects.
This release is named after a modern Saison beer from Montréal's Oshlag microbrewery. It is a refreshing, zesty, rice beer with hints of fruit and spices. Some even say it makes for a great Somaek when mixed with Chamisul Soju, not that we've tried!
Lafontaine is also a tongue-in-cheek reference to a water leak that affected EfficiOS's offices during the development of this release.

Read more

Also: LTTng 2.11.0 "Lafontaine" released

Top 20 Best Openbox Themes for Linux System in 2019

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Have you ever heard about the stacking window manager, Openbox? It is broadly used in Unix-like systems. Most probably, it’s among the most customizable parts out there. You can easily modify and beautify this with a little bit of effort. The question may arise- with what and how can you do this? Well! We are going to disclose it now. It’s by Openbox themes, which lets you have a minimalist and fantastic visual interface for your desktop manager.

Read more

Fedora IoT Review

Filed under
Red Hat
Reviews

With the rise in IoT use, we are witnessing a demand for ready-made operating systems to support smart device development. Currently, the race is between proprietary versions such as IoT Plug and Play by Microsoft and open source operating systems.

One such emerging open source player is Fedora which has a workstation that supports virtualization and containers. Fedora is also slated to release an Internet of Things edition called “Fedora IoT” in future.

Here is a review of the open source product’s support capabilities for IoT and relevant installation details.

Read more

5 Practical Examples of the Read Command in Linux

Filed under
HowTos

With read command, you can make your bash script interactive by accepting user inputs. Learn to use the read command in Linux with these practical examples.
Read more

Programming: C++, C and Python

Filed under
Development
  • Extend C++ capabilities with LLVM STLExtras.h

    The LLVM compiler project provides a header file called STLExtras.h that extends the capabilities of C++ without any dependency on the rest of LLVM. In this article, we take a quick look at its basic functionality.

  • Rewriting Old Solaris C Code In Python Yielded A 17x Performance Improvement

    While we normally hear of rewriting code from Python and other scripting languages into C/C++ when its a matter of performance, in the case of Oracle Solaris it was taking old C code and modernizing it in Python 3 to yield a ~17x performance improvement.

    Shared today on Oracle's official Solaris blog was an interesting anecdote about their listusers command being rewritten in Python 3 from C. Oracle's Darren Moffat noted the C code was largely untouched since around 1988 and given its design at a time when systems were less dense than today with hundreds or even thousands of users per system.

  • Python Projects for Beginners: The Best Way to Learn

    Learning Python can be difficult. You can spend time reading a textbook or watching videos, but then struggle to actually put what you've learned into practice. Or you might spend a ton of time learning syntax and get bored or lose motivation.

    How can you increase your chances of success? By building Python projects. That way you're learning by actually doing what you want to do!

    When I was learning Python, building projects helped me bring together everything I was learning. Once I started building projects, I immediately felt like I was making more progress.

  • PyCon 2019: The People of PyCon

    I can’t tell you how amazing it was to meet the individuals I read, listen to, or who make the tools I use.

    I was so happy to meet the authors that helped me to grow over the last few years, especially Dan Bader, Peter Baumgartner, Matt Harrison, Reuven Lerner, Harry Percival , and Lacey Williams Henschel.

    I love podcasts, so it was wonderful to meet Michael Kennedy and Brian Okken in person.

    And I was happy to meet Paul Ganssle, Russell Keith-Magee, Barry Warsaw, and other maintainers and contributors.

    It was a delight to meet Bob Belderbos and Julian Sequeira from PyBites.

  • Find the first non-consecutive number with Python

    Your task is to find the first element of an array that is not consecutive.

    E.g. If we have an array [1,2,3,4,6,7,8] then 1 then 2 then 3 then 4 are all consecutive but 6 is not, so that’s the first non-consecutive number.

    If the whole array is consecutive then return None.

  • Perceiving Python programming paradigms

    Early each year, TIOBE announces its Programming Language of The Year. When its latest annual TIOBE index report came out, I was not at all surprised to see Python again winning the title, which was based on capturing the most search engine ranking points (especially on Google, Bing, Yahoo, Wikipedia, Amazon, YouTube, and Baidu) in 2018.

OSI Announces Appointment of New Board Directors

Filed under
OSS

The Open Source Initiative (OSI) is pleased to announce the appointments of Deb Bryant and Tracy Hinds to fill the two vacant seats on the OSI Board of Directors. Their terms will begin immediately and run through October 2021. We hope you will join us in welcoming both to the OSI.

Deb Bryant is returning to the OSI Board after spending several years away. After spending her days as the Senior Director of the Open Source Programs Office at Red Hat, Deb volunteers for open source organizations and supports the open source community. Bryant is passionate about open and transparent governments, bringing open source technology and ideas into the public sector.

Tracy Hinds has an impressive history of managing development, operations, and growth for non-profit and for-profit organizations. Previous Education and Community Manager as well as Board Director of the OpenJS(formerly Node.js) Foundation, Hinds now works as Head of Platform at Samsung NEXT and is the president of GatherScript, where she works to support startup engagement and community, inspired by her prior work as a web engineer, community builder, OSS advocate, and strategist.

Read more

A Trustworthy Free/Libre Linux Capable 64bit RISC-V Computer

Filed under
GNU
Linux

My goal is to build a Free/OpenSource computer from the ground up, so I may completely trust that the entire hardware+software system's behavior is 100% attributable to its fully available HDL (Hardware Description Language) and Software sources.
More importantly, I need all the compilers and associated toolchains involved in building the overall system (from HDL and Software sources) to be Free/OpenSource, and to be themselves buildable and runnable on the computer system being described. In other words, I need a self-hosting Free/OpenSource hardware+software stack!

Read more

Also: COM offers 9th or 8th Gen Coffee Lake with 10Gbps USB 3.2 and up to 96GB RAM

Dragora 3.0-beta1 released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I am pleased to announce the release of Dragora 3.0 Beta 1.

Dragora is a complete and reliable distribution of the GNU/Linux operating system that is entirely free software. Dragora is founded on the concepts of simplicity and elegance, it can be run for almost any purpose (desktop,
workstation, server, development, etc.). The intended audience is people
interested in learning more about the technical aspects of a friendly
GNU/Linux distribution.  Also people looking to use the purest ethical
software for daily use.

The beginning of the development of the series 3.0 represents the
migration towards a new C library, Musl.  The continuation of
supervision capabilities (introduced for the services in 2012).
The restructuring of the hierarchy of directories, the improvement of
the tools provided by the distribution, a new automatic method to build
the distribution, the prebuilt cross-compiler set, and much more!

The homepage is at www.dragora.org

Current development pages are located at
https://git.savannah.nongnu.org/cgit/dragora.git/ and
https://notabug.org/dragora/

Changes in this version:

  * A new installer for this series has been introduced, it can be
    invoked from the command line as `dragora-installer'.

  * A new tool (based on dialog(1)) has been introduced to
    configure the keyboard mapping in the console, it is called
    `dragora-keymap'.

  * Our simple and friendly package manager has reached version 1.3,
    which contains minor changes and fixes.  It is worth mentioning
    that Qi now uses `tarlz' to produce, list packages in parallel.
    Tarlz uses a simplified and safer variant of the POSIX pax format
    compressed with our favorite compressor "lzip".

  * To complement the security in general, for binaries with PIE and
SSP (both are default features in Dragora), they are now complemented
    with RELRO by default.

  * The main toolchain has been upgraded.  This -beta1 have Binutils
    2.33.1, The GNU C Compiler 9, GNU Linux libre 4.19.78, and
    Musl 1.1.24.

  * LibreSSL has been upgraded to the version 3.0.1

  * Ruby (programming language) version 2.6.5 has been introduced.

  * Support for FUSE (in the kernel) and user space, is now available
    in Dragora.

  * Xfce 4.14 has been introduced in this version.

  * dragora-ice, a customized version of IceWM has been added.

  * All the official X.Org components has been updated (drivers, server,
    applications, etc.).  Included new drivers: xf86-input-elographics,
    xf86-video-amdgpu, xf86-video-vboxvideo.  The configuration for the
    xf86-video-intel driver has been fixed this time.

  * Work to complete DocBook support in Dragora is underway.

  * Build recipes for new packages have been built:

    Please, traverse the /usr/pkg hierarchy for a full view of
    installed packages.

  * Many general fixes, improvements, and clean ups have been performed.

The ISO images may be fetched at:

    https://sourceforge.net/projects/dragora/files/beta/

See http://dragora.org/en/mirrors.html for a list of available mirrors.

The sha256sums are:

59a1c1693d62c2d61a0d5b4b826313ce8b736768b1a42097f1478a20a37f7a80 dragora-3.0-i586-beta1-live.iso 3127ea5b619b8e049b45a17e1e4d9c538b35ac067a7cd63d2262a30782e7cc2d dragora-3.0-i586-beta1-packages.iso 1c0f63a69cd4b674b742550562605f240e98cdbc63ab670c9f8cdd5d2d134efc dragora-3.0-x86_64-beta1-live.iso 2dd58b1e6429876aa1883b4682914184bce6cac2adfe53ea7c2e0c46d7987385 dragora-3.0-x86_64-beta1-packages.iso

Dragora is available in "live" or hybrid ISO image form. You need the .iso
for the packages if you want to perform a hard disk installation.

Notes:

* The password for the root user in the Live CD is: dragora

This beta version can be considered as stable, it is catalogued just as
beta because it lacks many things that we will try to complement in future
versions.

We welcome feedback at our Freenode IRC channel, #dragora, and on our
mailing list.  We are looking for help with documentation, testing,
bug reports, patches, etc.

Thank you to all of you who support this humble project made with great
sacrifice.  And thank you especially for supporting the philosophy and
spirit of software freedom that Dragora aims to promote.

Best regards,
Matias Fonzo, Dragora author and maintainer.

--
``Someone told me I would never be free
The way you are is way you'll always be
But it's all wrong!
There's Time To Burn'' - Ronnie James Dio

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